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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'nera'

Gèlèdè Mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
Gèlèdè Mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
€ 12,000.00
Kifwebe mask, Songye people, Democratic Republic of Congo
Kifwebe mask, Songye people, Democratic Republic of Congo
€ 8,500.00
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
€ 55,000.00


 In sub-Saharan Africa, sculpture was and still is made and used for particular, practical purposes. In many instances it is used to mark events or stages of life, like fertility, birth, transition, death. For example, among the Yoruba in Nigeria, Ibeji twin-figurines (from ibi=first born and eji=two) are produced at the birth of someone's twins (a common occurance in this ethnic group). Among the Ashante in Ghana fertility figurines are carved, the Akuaba doll (akua=born on Wednesday and ba=child), to be worn by a young female in order to ensure her fertility. Ikenga figures embody protective spirits for worldly success and to protect the house-hold. Ancestor figures remind the people of those gone. Other carvings are used for initiation and coming-of-age rituals, for harvest festivals and celebrations, for funeral occasions.

 As sculptures in African society always had a practical purpose, they were made for particular occasions only, i.e. on commission from a patron. The client and the artisan would discuss the purpose of the work and agree a price before the sculptor set to work. The client would then rely on the artist to produce a familiar form in a familiar style. For him only the object would be important, not the carver. As most sculptures in Africa have a limited life span due to the climate (humidity, dampness, heat) and insect attack (woodworms, termites), carvings had to be replaced frequently. Nevertheless, "the artist is not a passive copyist, even though one of his major responsibilities is to replace destroyed works" (from African Art in the Cycle of Life, by Roy Sieber & Roslyn Adele Walker, 1987:20). In fact, in this way he represented his generation's link with the past. In other words, "each sculpture had its particular reason for
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art is an art museum located on the eastern edge of Central Park, along what is known as Museum Mile in New York City, USA. It has a permanent collection containing more than two million works of art, divided into nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, often referred to simply as "the Met," is one of the world's largest art galleries, and has a much smaller second location in Upper Manhattan, at "The Cloisters," which features medieval art.

Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. A number of notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. It opened on February 20, 1872, and was originally located at 681 Fifth Avenue.

As of 2007, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet.
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The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture situated in London. Its collections, which number more than 7 million objects, are among the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its beginning to the present.

The British Museum was established in 1753, largely based on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. The museum first opened to the public on 15 January 1759 in Montagu House in Bloomsbury, on the site of the current museum building. Its expansion over the following two and a half centuries has resulted in the creation of several branch institutions, the first being the British Museum of Natural History in South Kensington in 1887. Until 1997, when the current British Library building opened to the public, replacing the old British Museum Reading Room, the British Museum was unique in that it housed both a national museum of antiquities and a national library in the same building.

The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. As with all other national museums and art galleries in Britain, the Museum charges no admission fee, although charges are levied for some temporary special exhibitions. Since 2001 the director of the Museum has been Neil MacGregor.

History

Though principally a museum of cultural art objects and antiquities today, the British Museum was founded as a "universal museum". Its foundations lie in the will of the physician and naturalist Sir Hans Sloane (1660–1753). During the course of his lifetime Sloane gathered an enviable collection of curiosities and whilst not wishing to see his collection broken up after death, he bequeathed it to King George II, for the nation, for the princely sum of £20,000.

At that time,
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Sculpture dedicated to Gou divinity of wrought iron and war
Work iron 168cm in height made before 1858 by Akati Ekplékendo
Current Republic of Benin

Lauren Papet, Ecole du Louvre


Arrival in French collections and identification problems

This statue has been reported in France in 1894 by Captain Eugene Fonssagrives following the conquest of Dahomey. It belonged to the spoils of war found in the palaces of Abomey, abandoned by the fleeing King Behanzin, who himself had perhaps made on the side in preparation for the French attack in the hope that the god help protect the kingdom on its most vulnerable border. She was then given directly to the Trocadero Museum of Ethnography, the current Museum of Man (recorded April 30, 1894).

First Fonssagrives was presented as was a representation of Ebo, patron god of Ouidah thesis refuted by Maurice Delafosse in 1894, indicating that the divinity of Ouidah is not the serpent but Ebo Dan. The name "Ebo" would have probably been given Fonssagrives response when he asked what the object (Bo meaning receptacle of supernatural forces). She was named Gou, its present name after World War II, his resemblance to the voodoo (god) of iron and protector of the forge, metal and war have been considered fairly obvious.

Technical Achievement

Government also has a variety of techniques to work with iron: forged, rolled, hammered, nailed and riveted.

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The royal Museum of central Africa is located in Tervuren, Belgium, in some kilometres in Brussels.

Created in 1897 at the instigation of the king Leopold II he is intimately linked to the history of the colonisation of Congo by Belgium. The museum of Congo, colonial palace in layout art nouveau constructed in the middle of a sumptuous park linked up in Brussels by a double avenue especially creates, was at origin intended to awaken interest and curiosity of the Belgian people for what was in epoch'« independent State of Congo» (on 1884 in 1908).

After 1908, it became the Museum of Belgian Congo then the royal Museum of central Africa in 1960.
 
History of the museum

To give a window to his Congo and an idea of the economic potential of this region to the Belgians and so to attract investments, Leopold II wanted to do up a kind of museum by staging the original objects, imported in quantity according to a multiple-subject approach: anthropological, ethnological, botanical, zoological, entomological, geological and mineralogical.

Advertising poster for the museum (1910) On the occasion of the World fair of 1897, he made construct in the royal domain of Tervuren the "Palace of colonies" conceived by the Belgian architect Georges Hobé in style art nouveau of epoch. The temporary exhibition which was done up made the nice part
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Paul Klee, (prononcer "Klé"), est né le 18 décembre 1879 à Münchenbuchsee, près de Berne en Suisse et mort le 29 juin 1940. C'est un peintre suisse.

 

 Biographie

 Années de formation
Il grandit dans une famille de musiciens : sa mère, Ida, est chanteuse professionnelle, et son père, citoyen allemand, est professeur de musique dans la capitale helvétique. C'est de lui que Klee hérite son amour pour la musique. Lui-même excelle très tôt dans l'apprentissage du violon. À l'automne 1898, ayant terminé ses "examens de maturité" (baccalauréat) pour devenir avocat, il commence ses études de peinture à Munich, d'abord dans l'atelier particulier de Knirr, puis à l'Académie, sous la direction de Franz von Stuck. En 1899, il rencontre sa future femme, Lily Stumpf (*1876-†1946), une pianiste. En 1900, il s'inscrit à l'académie des beaux-arts de Munich où il cotoie Vassily Kandinsky. Il passe l'hiver 1901-1902 en Italie et visite Rome, Naples, Florence. Il se laisse prendre par le charme de l'architecture de la Renaissance, de Michel-Ange et des premiers maîtres du Quattrocento. Quelques voyages occasionnels le conduisent à Munich, où il découvre en 1904, Aubrey Beardsley, William Blake, Francisco Goya, James Ensor, puis à Paris en 1905. Il retourne à Munich à la fin de 1906 pour y épouser Lily Stumpf avec qui il aura un seul fils, Félix, né en 1907 et mort en 1990.


 Premières œuvres
À l'exposition de Munich, il fait la connaissance des oeuvres de Vincent van Gogh et de Paul Cézanne. Il y expose ses

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Subsaharian Africa
AUTOR(S)
Falgayrettes-Leveau, Marc Étienne, Jean-Paul Colleyn, Anne-Marie Bouttiaux, Christiane Owusu-Sarpong, Stefan Eisenhofer et Karin Guggeis, Viviane Baeke, Jean N’sondé, Anne van Cutsem-Vanderstraete, Alfred Adler, Fatou Sow, Joëlle Busca.
Under the direction de Christiane Falgayrettes-Leveau

How do the women appear in the arts of Africa ?
Reserved for worship or used in the daily, objects are accomplished, in general, by the men and for practices for which they have the responsibility. Number of them transmit information relating not only to aesthetics but also to functions occupied by the women in political, economic, social and religious life.
Writings suggest as much the idea of sensuality as of fecundity. Only or carrying a child, faces recall the roles of wife, of parent or of mother, the motherhood constituting a major topic which is found in almost all cultures. Sometimes, subjects return to the power exercised by some women, ancestors, queen mothers, officiants leaning on texts of sociologists, of ethnologists, of historians of art, and on a rich iconography (writings of private and prestigious, public collections, documents of ground), this work sets out to recall the multiplicity of female
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Even presented beyond their ethnographic context, the female representations produced by African artists remain strong, both aesthetic choices remain compelling. The Eye Gallery and the Main has a selection of works whose wife is the central subject: maternity, reliquaries, dolls, locks, seats, fetishes, puppets, masks ... all traditional works produced for different purposes, often very utilitarian and share the lack of realism. Yet, the authority that comes from a Dogon figure, is the opposite of the impression that emanates submission in general models of feminine beauty, like the masks of pwo Tchokwe, which are worn by men, but also for the elaborate hairstyles of Mende, who are nevertheless confined exclusively female company. It can be found most touching a small doll of a woman Mossi biga fertility has focused on her and treated as his own child. It is just a simple piece of wood without arms or legs whose femininity is limited to a few signs - hair, eyes, breasts, ports - but just how easy and how success in abstraction.

"FEMINAFRICA" of Wednesday, May 17 to Friday, June 30, 2006.

African Art / African Art / primitive art / primitive art / primitive arts / art gallery / art Tribal / Tribal Art / Africa / Africa / eye and hand / first art gallery / buy / sell / expertise / expert / exposure / exhibition / collection / collectors / Paris / work / Verneuil / antiques / antique / museum / museum / mask / mask / statue / sculpture / Agalom / Armand Auxiètre / www.african-paris.com /

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Image 12 elephants masks

Whoever works on the timber can not remove and it should not be mistaken because the return is prohibited. We must therefore bear in mind exactly what you want to achieve and work on a large piece is even more risky that the goal is complex and difficult to reach final equilibrium. Bring forth a form of matter that is not an accurate representation but still recognizable to blow is a recognized quality artists. Zoomorphic masks African accentuate the characters without falling into caricature. The great elephant mask from Cameroon have much larger ears, their trunks very long but they are realistic. The open mouth on the teeth, we imagine a loud cry. And the general attitude expresses the power and might. Considered a royal animal, a privilege of a few lineages, the elephant masks, carried horizontally, appear only rarely in the masquerades and they go last on the dance venues.

Bamileke elephant masks and hoods are beaded to the more abstract. They are recognizable by their large ears flat and we must consider that the long anterior descending to the feet is a mistake but there is no representation of defense and the face is very human characters. They are cons beautifully decorated with beads arranged in geometric patterns. These are worn by members of the society of the elephant under the command of the king, the fon.

In contrast to the achievements of Cameroon zoomorphic masks Izzi elephants are complex compositions and particularly fantastic or only careful study can discern the features of the animal. Trompe shortened

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african art / art africain / primitive art / art primitif / arts premiers / art gallery / art tribal / tribal art / l'oeil et la main / galerie d'art premier / Agalom / Armand Auxiètre / www.african-paris.com / www.agalom.com

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David Norden
http://users.telenet.be/african-shop/kerchache.htm

In a crucial moment for the world of Tribal Arts, Ana &Antonio Casanovas from Arte y Ritual and Alain Bovis Gallery present two consecutive exhibitions in Paris with a selection of masterworks from the Kerchache collection:

1.”HOMMAGE” June 16-July 22 2006
2. “NIGERIA” September 13th –October 20th 2006

“HOMAGE TO JACQUES KERCHACHE”

WHY?

The Quai Branly

We want to pay an HOMAGE to Jacques Kerchache and , in his name, give support to an important historical event : the opening of the Quai Branly,one of the most important museums in the world dedicated entirely to “les Arts Premiers”. Jacques was first appointed to asses the selection of art works for the “Pavillion des Sessions” in the Louvre Museum which was conceived as an antennae of the Quai Branly.He had a crucial role in the creation of this innovative museum and was an important member of the Acquisition Committee.

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es Statues Also Die is a French documentary short film directed by Chris Marker, Alain Resnais and Ghislain Cloquet released in 1953. Artistic Advisor: Charles Ratton.

It was sponsored by the Pan-African journal Presence Africaine. Starting from the question "Why art negro is there at the Museum of Man while Greek or Egyptian art is the Louvre? ', Both filmmakers denounced the lack of consideration for African art in a context of colonization. The film was censored in France for eight years because of his views anti-colonialist.

"When men are dead, they make history. When the statues are dead, they enter into art. This Botanical death is what we call culture.

Because the people of the statues is mortal. One day, our stony faces break down in turn. A civilization is leaving behind traces such as mutilated stones of Tom Thumb, but history has eaten everything. An object is dead when the living gaze which rested on him has disappeared, and when we lost our items will go where we send those negroes in the museum.

Art negro. We look as if it was his purpose in the pleasure it gives us. The intentions of the negro who created the emotions of the negro who looks at it, it eludes us. Because they are written into the woods, we take their ideas for statues, and we find the picturesque where a member of the black community sees the face of a culture.

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P R E F A C E


In one of the chaos of rocks the most amazing of Africa, has a population of farmer-warriors who was one of the last of the French domain to lose its independence.


For most whites in West Africa, the Dogon are dangerous men, if not the most backward of the Federation. Ilspassent to practice human sacrifice and even to defend themselves better against all the outside influences that they live a difficult country. Some writers have told their small fears when supposedly daring excursions. From these legends and the pretext of revolts often due to misunderstandings, it has sometimes taken in exile of entire villages.


In short, the Dogon represent one of the finest examples of primitive savage and this opinion is shared by some black Muslims who, intellectually, are not better equipped than whites to appreciate those of their fellow faithful to ancestral traditions. Only officials who have assumed the heavy task of administering these men have learned to love them.


The author of this book and its many teammates attend the Dogon past fifteen years. They published the work of these men who are now the people's best-known French Sudan: The Souls of the Dogon (G. Dieterlen, 1941), The Currency (S. OF GANAY 1941), Masks (M. Griaule, 1938) have brought to scholarly evidence that blacks lived on complex ideas, but ordered, on systems of institutions and rituals where nothing is left to chance or whim. This work, already ten years ago, drew

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Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (July 12, 1884 – January 24, 1920) was an Italian artist of Jewish heritage, practicing both painting and sculpture, who pursued his career for the most part in France. Modigliani was born in Livorno (historically referred to in English as Leghorn), in northwestern Italy and began his artistic studies in Italy before moving to Paris in 1906. Influenced by the artists in his circle of friends and associates, by a range of genres and art movements, and by primitive art, Modigliani's œuvre was nonetheless unique and idiosyncratic. He died in Paris of tubercular meningitis, exacerbated by poverty, overworking, and an excessive use of alcohol and narcotics, at the age of 35.

Early life

Amedeo Modigliani was born into a Jewish family at Livorno, in Tuscany. Livorno was still a relatively new city, by Italian standards, in the late 19th century. The Livorno that Modigliani knew was a bustling centre of commerce focused upon seafaring and shipwrighting, but its cultural history lay in being a refuge for those persecuted for their religion. His own maternal great-great-grandfather was one Solomon Garsin, a Jew who had immigrated to Livorno in the eighteenth century as a religious refugee.

Modigliani was the fourth child of Flaminio Modigliani and his wife, Eugenia Garsin. His father was in the money-changing business, but when the business went bankrupt, the family lived in dire poverty. In fact, Amedeo's birth saved the family from certain ruin, as, according to an ancient law, creditors could not seize the bed of a pregnant woman or a mother

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Anne-Louise Amanieu
Ecole du Louvre
Specialty Arts of Africa
December 2007

Fang mask society Ngil, Gabon, Pavilion des Sessions at the Louvre

IDENTIFICATION

Fang mask the Pavillon des Sessions consists partly of wood covered with kaolin and measure about 70 cm high. It dates from the late nineteenth century or early twentieth. Listed under the inventory number 65-104-1, it comes from the former collection of André Lefèvre and was acquired in 1965 by the Museum of Man.

DESCRIPTION

This great helmet mask represents a stylized human face, whose face and elongated heart-shaped and slightly concave is shared by a long thin nose. On the top of the forehead develops a studded headband for attaching ornaments and who bears a ridge with extension to the front leads by three strokes for joining the nasal bridge and deployed above the eyebrows. The C-shaped ears stand out in high relief on both sides of the face, as the eyes and mouth, they are barely mentioned by simple incisions highlighted by thin slits etched tattoos that recall that arborist and the Fang Ntoumou Mvai by Günter Tessmann.

ANALYSIS

The mask of Ngil (NGI) exists only among the Fang, the people established the Sanaga River (southern Cameroon) Ogooué River (northern Gabon) and in Equatorial Guinea after a period of migration to the eighteenth and

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Tristan Tzara (born Samuel or Samy Rosenstock, also known as S. Samyro; April 4 or April 16, 1896 – December 25, 1963) was a Romanian and Frenchavant-garde poet, essayist and performance artist. Also active as a journalist, playwright, literary and art critic, composer and film director, he was known best for being one of the founders and central figures of the anti-establishmentDada movement. Under the influence of Adrian Maniu, the adolescent Tzara became interested in Symbolism and co-founded the magazine Simbolulwith Ion Vinea (with whom he also wrote experimental poetry) and painter Marcel Janco. During World War I, after briefly collaborating on Vinea's Chemarea, he joined Janco in Switzerland. There, Tzara's shows at the Cabaret Voltaire and Zunfthaus zur Waag, as well as his poetry and art manifestos, became a main feature of early Dadaism. His work represented Dada's nihilisticside, in contrast with the more moderate approach favored by Hugo Ball.

After moving to Paris in 1919, Tzara, by then one of the "presidents of Dada", joined the staff of Littérature magazine, which marked the first step in the movement's evolution toward Surrealism. He was involved in the major polemics which led to Dada's split, defending his principles against André Breton and Francis Picabia, and, in Romania, against the eclecticmodernism of Vinea and Janco. This personal vision on art defined his Dadaist plays The Gas Heart (1921) and Handkerchief of Clouds (1924). A forerunner of automatist techniques, Tzara eventually rallied with Breton's Surrealism, and, under its influence, wrote his celebrated utopianpoem The Approximate Man.

During the final part of his career, Tzara combined his humanist and anti-fascistperspective with a

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Pablo Diego José Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Martyr Patricio Clito Ruíz y Picasso (25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was an Andalusian-Spanishpainter, draughtsman, and sculptor. As one of the most recognized figures in twentieth-century art, he is best known for co-founding the Cubistmovement and for the wide variety of styles embodied in his work. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907) and his depiction of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War, Guernica (1937)

Biography

Picasso was baptized Pablo Diego José Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima TrinidadClito, a series of names honouring various saints and relatives. Added to these were Ruíz and Picasso, for his father and mother, respectively, as per Spanish custom. Born in the city of Málaga in the

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André Derain (10 June 1880 – 8 September 1954) was a French painter and co-founder of Fauvism with Henri Matisse.

Biography

André Derain was born in 1880 in Chatou, Yvelines, Île-de-France, just outside Paris. In 1898, while studying to be an engineer at the Académie Camillo, he attended painting classes under Eugène Carrière, and there met Matisse. In 1900, he met and shared a studio with Maurice de Vlaminck and began to paint his first landscapes. His studies were interrupted from 1901 to 1904 when he was conscriptedinto the French army. Following his release from service, Matisse persuaded Derain's parents to allow him to abandon his engineering career and devote himself solely to painting; subsequently Derain attended the Académie Julian.

Derain and Matisse worked together through the summer of 1905 in the Mediterraneanvillage of Collioureand later that year displayed their highly innovative paintings at the Salon d'Automne. The vivid, unnatural colors led the critic Louis Vauxcelles to derisively dub their works as les Fauves, or "the wild beasts", marking the start of the Fauvist movement. In March 1906, the noted art dealer Ambroise Vollard sent Derain to London to compose a series of paintings with the city as subject. In 30 paintings (29 of which are still extant), Derain put forth a

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Sir Henry Morton Stanley , GCB, born John Rowlands (January 28, 1841 – May 10, 1904), was a Britishjournalist and explorer famous for his exploration of Africa and his search for David Livingstone. Stanley is often remembered for the words uttered to Livingstone upon finding him: "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?", although there is some question as to authenticity of this now famous greeting.

Biography

Stanley was born in Denbigh, Wales. At the time, his mother, Elizabeth Parry, was nineteen years old. According to Stanley himself, his father, John Rowlands, was an alcoholic; there is some doubt as to his true parentage. His parents were unmarried, so his birth certificate refers to him as a bastard, and the stigma of illegitimacy weighed heavily upon him all his life. He was raised by his grandfather until the age of five. When his guardian died, Stanley stayed at first with cousins and nieces for a short time, but was eventually sent to St. Asaph Union Workhouse for the poor, where overcrowding and lack of supervision resulted in frequent abuse by the older boys. When he was ten, his mother and two siblings stayed for a short while in this workhouse, without Stanley realizing who they were. He stayed until the age of 15. After completing an elementary education, he was employed as a pupil teacher in a National School. In 1859, at the age of 18, he made his passage to the United States in search of a new life. Upon arriving in New Orleans, he absconded from his boat. According to his own declarations, he became friendly with a wealthy trader named Stanley, by accident: he saw Stanley sitting on a chair outside his store and asked him if he had any job opening for a person such as himself. However, he did so in the British style, "Do you want a boy, sir?" As it happened, the childless man had indeed

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Pietro Paolo Savorgnan di Brazzà, best known as Pierre Paul François Camille Savorgnan de Brazza (January 26,1852 - September 14, 1905), was a Franco-Italian explorer, born in Italy and later naturalizedFrenchman. With the backing of the Société de Géographique de Paris, he opened up for France entry along the right bank of the Congo that eventually led to French colonies in Central Africa. His easy manner and great physical charm, as well as his pacific approach among Africans, were his trademarks. Under French colonial rule, Brazzaville, the capital of the Republic of the Congo was named in his honor.

Early  years

Born in Rome on January 26,1852, Pietro Savorgnan di Brazzà was the seventh son of Count Ascanio Savorgnan di Brazzà, a nobleman of Udine with many French connections and Giacinta Simonetti. Pietro was interested in exploration from an early age and won entry to the French naval school at Brest, graduated as an ensign, and went on the French ship Jeanne d'Arc to Algeria.

Exploration to Africa

 

His next ship was the Venus, which stopped at Gabonregularly, and in 1874, de Brazza made two trips, up the Gabon Riverand Ogoue River. He then proposed to the government that he explore the Ogoueto its source, and with the help of friends in high places, including Jules Ferryand Leon Gambetta, he secured partial funding, the rest

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