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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
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Result of the research Result of the research : 'nera'

Gèlèdè Mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
Gèlèdè Mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
€ 12,000.00
Kifwebe mask, Songye people, Democratic Republic of Congo
Kifwebe mask, Songye people, Democratic Republic of Congo
€ 8,500.00
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
€ 55,000.00

dan


Image dan

Dan

In the also known under the name of Yacub, living in western Côte d'Ivoire and Liberia, in a wooded area south and covered by savannah in the north. At 350000 they live on cocoa cultivation of rice and cassava. Before that secret societies do not unite around the beginning of the century, Dan lived in autonomous villages, headed by a chief elected for its wealth and social position.

Nowadays society Leopard plays a major role in the lives of Dan: Candidates for initiation must pass a period of isolation in the forest three to four months. The dances are known for their festivals which were originally village ceremonies but who today are rather aimed at tourists during these holidays appear dancers often perched on stilts.

Masks:

Dan masks are characterized by a concave face, pointed chin a protruding mouth, high forehead and are often covered with a rich brown patina, masks of similar types exist throughout the country Dan, but some stylistic variations, can be observed. For example: the masks of the north dan often have delicate features, a high forehead smooth eye in the middle of the face and a very smooth patina obtained by immersing the mask in a mud bath. The masks of southern Dan Rather, protruding features and a grainy patina achieved by application of plant pigments.

Different types of masks exist and Dan each have a specific function.

Deangle the mask is characterized by a front line separated by a median of almond eyes, sometimes covered with kaolin, is worn

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Image baga

45000 Baga, live along the coast of Guinea Bissau in villages divided into two and four districts, themselves subdivided into 5 and 6 clans. According to tradition each village is headed by the oldest members of each clan were meeting in secret. Nowadays this system has been replaced by a mayor elected from each village.

The Baga worship a single god called Kanu assisted by a male spirit, Somtup, and a female spirit-A bowl. A spirit often represented by a snake, watch over the lower ranks of society to-Lom responsible for initiation rites.

The first sculptures Baga appeared in the West during the 50s, the impact of Islamization, and the abandonment of traditional rites and beliefs, the Western traders allowed to export the masks and headdresses Baga statues. Nowadays Baga trying to restore their culture with the help of their elders, they recreate ceremonies and celebrations that punctuated their traditional life.

Masks:

The mask is the most famous Baga Nimba called, is a mask shoulder supported by four pillars, it has large breasts, a large head with semi-circular ears, a chin and a pointy nose. He appeared at weddings, births, ceremonies related to crops and more generally in the ceremonies connected with joyful events. Two styles of Nimba masks have been identified, the first best known in the West has a concave face, whereas the second has a convex face.

The crest known as: Ziringen Wonde, was worn by dancers during ceremonies marking the end of the periods of initiation of girls,

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Image Dogon

DOGON ART

 

 

 

Dominating from the XIVth century the Bandiagra's cliffs, in Malia, DOGON initiated

a very old artistic production. Line and  shape's style is the main criterion to show power

of rites organising their society. Each work is a deep representation of cosmogony structuring

daily life.

 

A single cosmogony

 

As a patriarcal society, all professions have a ritual meaning according to God Amma and

his eight ancestors. DOGON

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Lobi

The tribes living in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Togo, live the culture of millet, cotton and occasionally livestock in the northern parts of the region. religious activities are dictated by the seasons. For example, during the dry season, when crops were made for festivals and ceremonies are held.

LOBI:
the two hundred and fifty miles Lobi, inhabit a territory spanning 3 countries, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Ivory Coast, they revere the spirits called Thil who are honored on altars built according to the instructions of the sorcerers. Generally located on the roof or inside houses. These altars are filled with objects such as crockery, iron statues of abstract form, and statues of wood or stone known as the Batebi supposed to incarnate the spirits Thil. Batebi Lobi statues measure between 5 and 60 cm have legs slightly bent and a big head hair smooth or fluted Batebi two categories can be distinguished. the first includes Batebi apotropaic, known as the Batebi dutundora which typically measure 60cm in height, and whose main characteristic is a ferocious expression, showing their ability to chase the evil forces.
The second type of Batebi embodies Thil spirits, and includes statues of wood or clay, in various positions, each corresponding to a specific Thil.
For example, the statue with outstretched arms, or raised arms symbolizes a dangerous Thil, while couples in sexual positions or statues of motherhood are supposed to embody a spirit thil who

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The Senufo

scattered between the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso, Mali, one million five hundred thousand Senufo, live off agriculture and occasional hunting. they live in villages ruled by councils of elders, who elect a leader. cohesion of the tribe is reinforced by the Poro society initiates, and educates the Senufo men from lâge 7 years. Senufo theology based on the presence of a powerful god, Koulotiolo, and a mother goddess Katielo, which through the rites of the Poro society ruled over the world.
The Senufo art is one of the first to have been admired by Westerners, their artistic production is abundant, and their statues and masks are characterized by a mixture of realistic detail, allied to pure geometric forms. playing on the empty and full.

Masks:

the Senufo, use different types of masks, according to the occasion. mask called Kpéliyée used by members of the Poro society has a heart shaped face surrounded by fins. mask helmet représentatnt janiforme a buffalo head is used for funerals and in times of crisis. its main function is to destroy the evil spirits, his power comes from a small cup placed on top of his skull containing magical substances. sometimes for dancing sparks out of his mouth that earned him the name "fire-eater." another type of helmet mask, a buffalo head, under a pair of antelope horns, are used primarily during initiation ceremonies poro.
Senufo artists have created three types of crest, the first

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Image yaka

Arts of Africa first Black Arts Spring 1981 No. 77
When we examine the significance of an African mask, we do not seek to know what the "message" it provides, by virtue of some essential notion of disguise and by his presence, but rather what kind of continuum it belongs. The masks are at the confluence of pictorial traditions, oral and functional none appears (under secular unable to recognize the subjects and even less discernible. The understanding of pictorial code used requires not only a review but a review of developed components as needed through the original context. Let us offer an example of the image with respect to the buffalo in the region of Zaire Kwango-Kwilu South West (1).
Synceros caffer, the largest of African cattle is a massive animal, black, cropped hair, measuring 1.50 m at the shoulder and weighing nearly a ton (900 kg.) (Fig. 1). Its heavy horns have a spacing of one meter, are curved downward and inward and form large lumps to their bases. This animal, originally occupied the central, eastern and southern Africa, frequenting the open plains, open woods and river beds and marshes bordered by reeds. Commonly preview herds of a dozen to a hundred heads, he used to graze and graze the early morning and again at dusk, seeking shade during the hottest hours but sometimes moving at night . Females do not carry a calf for about eleven months.

Considered peaceful, was injured when he can become, for hunters, the most dangerous animal of any big game on the continent (Fig. 2). He is known for his

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Image Pavillon du Cameroun
L’essentiel

Le pavillon a pour élément central de conception un arbre géant; le vert, le jaune et le bleu donnent le ton aux espaces ouverts du pavillon pour montrer le naturel, l’optimisme et le dynamisme de la nation. Les espaces d’exposition créent une ambiance de l’union harmonieuse ciel-terrehomme et montrent l’aménagement de la cité et le nouvel aspect du développement de l’habitat civil afin de développer le thème «Le remodelage de la communauté urbaine».

A ne pas manquer 1

Un arbre luxuriant couvre tout le pavillon, suggérant que le Cameroun accorde plus d’éléments modernes et de romantisme à la communauté traditionnelle et reflétant la protection efficace des forêts du pays.

A ne pas manquer 2

Le terrain de football simulé du pavillon permet aux visiteurs de découvrir la vie agréable urbaine et la passion pour le football du peuple.

Pavillon de Cameroun

La République du Cameroun se trouve sur le carrefour de l’Afrique centrale et occidentale. Le pays est connu pour ses caracteristiques topographiques et ses cultures très variées.

Depuis Canadien World Exhibition - Expo'67, le Cameroun a également participé à l’Exposition Universelle de Gênes 1992, Universal Exhibition Hannover 2000 et International Exhibition 2005, Aichi, Japon.

Pavillon de Cameroun

Thème: Remoulage des Communautés Urbaines

(Remodeling of Communities in the City)

Le pavillon suscite une réflexion camerounaise face à la reconstruction et l’aménagement rationnel de la ville ainsi que son attention et sa décision mise en oeuvre à la construction urbaine au
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Image African Art Exhibition of 1923

This is a copy of the catalogue of the exhibition of 1923 in Brooklyn Museum, In 1903 Stewart Culin became the founding curator of the department of ethnology at the museum of the Brooklyn institute of arts and sciences, now the Brooklyn museum Culin a self taught ethnologist built the foundation of four curatorial collections for the museum, acquiring objects representing African Asian native American and estaern European culture

 

 

 

Culin was among the first curator to recognize museum installation as an art form, he was also among the first to display ethnological as art objects, not as ethnographic specimens. This approach is evidenced in his exhibition “primitive negro art”

 

 

 

The exhibition opened in april 1923 and displayed African objects he had acquired in Europe from dealers. Along with his colleagues Culin set the parameters for cultural representation in museum through his collection decisions and innovative installations.

 

 

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Image 1923 - Brooklyn museum

This is a copy of the catalogue of the exhibition of 1923 in Brooklyn Museum, In 1903 Stewart Culin became the founding curator of the department of ethnology at the museum of the Brooklyn institute of arts and sciences, now the Brooklyn museum Culin a self taught ethnologist built the foundation of four curatorial collections for the museum, acquiring objects representing African Asian native American and estaern European culture

 

Culin was among the first curator to recognize museum installation as an art form, he was also among the first to display ethnological as art objects, not as ethnographic specimens. This approach is evidenced in his exhibition “primitive negro art”

 

The exhibition opened in april 1923 and displayed African objects he had acquired in Europe from dealers. Along with his colleagues Culin set the parameters for cultural representation in museum through his collection decisions and innovative installations.

 

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Image Exposition Fleuve Congo - les ethnies

The works are presented in a geographical journey of productions ranging from West to East, both from Gabon to Congo:

* The Fang peoples and related
* The Kwele
* The Mbede-Kota
* The Tsogho, Galwa, Aduma, Vuvi and Teke (Tsaayi)
* The Ngbaka, and Ngbandi Ngombe
* The Mbole, Yela, Metoko, Komo, Jong, Lengola and Kela
* The Lega and Bembe

THE FANG:

THE KWELE: they live on the northern border of the Republic of Congo, and have used a type of mask called Ekuk, they are flat masks, which have incised eyes, often a white face in a heart-shaped nose triangle-shaped eyes and coffee bean. these masks were hung in homes rarely worn during ceremonies, initiation Bwetes worship, their function was to conduct a village to enable forces are beneficial Bwetes capita.

THE KOTA: Living in the eastern part of Gabon, on the border with the Republic of Congo, Kota, include a number of tribes, such as Mahongwe the Sango, the Obamba, and Shamay, who practice the same rituals and shared cultural traits. They probably migrated southward during the 18th, and now live in the valley of the river, Ogonoué in a forest environment. from their economic resources, sutout hunting and agriculture. Kota the past, had the habit of leaving their dead exposed to the elements in the forest. Under the influence of neighboring tribes, they began to bury their cefs and keep their bones (mainly the skull) to place them with

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Congo River Exhibition from June 22 to October 3, 2010 - Quai Branly -
Practical information

Date: Tuesday, June 22, 2010
on Sunday, October 3, 2010

Times: Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays from 11h to 19h Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 11am to 21pm

Location: East Mezzanine

Fares: Ticket collections

37 Quai Branly
75007 Paris
01 56 61 70 00
Metro: Iena

EXPOSURE:

The Musée du Quai Branly This summer, through 170 documents and 80 major works, a major exhibition devoted to the artistic traditions of Central Africa, including Gabon, Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Real journey of leading the visitor of the northern forests to savannas, South exhibition demonstrates the links between works produced in the regions bordering the Congo River, for various populations of Bantu languages.

Behind the variety of masks and sculptures Fang, Hemba, kweli or kota, the exhibition highlights the major works of Central Africa, in their design, structure and artistic connections that bring them closer.

The three themes of the exhibition, common core to these peoples iconophiles are complementary:

    
* Masks and statues with the "heart-shaped face, and ensure the unity and identity of the respective groups;

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L' Historique de la Biennale des Antiquaires depuis 1962



La Biennale des antiquaires

Un rendez-vous prestigieux

Créée en 1962, la première Biennale des antiquaires se tient au Grand Palais où elle a lieu régulièrement jusqu'à la fermeture de la Nef pour travaux. 2006 marque le grand retour de la Biennale des antiquaires sous la verrière du Grand Palais.

Biennale des antiquaires 2006. Le dôme illuminé. © Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication, cliché Didier Plowy
Cette prestigieuse foire rassemble les plus grands marchands français et étrangers, les collectionneurs fortunés et les amateurs avertis. Elle offre un panorama unique de plusieurs siècles d'art. Amateurs de mobiliers, tapisseries, faïences, peintures anciennes trouvent à coup sûr leur bonheur parmi toutes les propositions, allant des arts premiers à la peinture moderne en passant par le XVIIIe, l'Art déco ou les années cinquante.

La Biennale des antiquaires est organisée par le Syndicat national des antiquaires depuis 1956 D'abord annuelle, elle devient biennale et
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The group Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of all Akan in Ghana.

They speak Twi is a dialect of Akan belonging to the Kwa group of languages.
Flag of the Ashanti


Geographical
Empire Asante in Ghana

Asante federation grows in the thirteenth century. Kumasi is the capital . In the nineteenth century, the civilization reached its peak and occupies nearly 70% of modern Ghana.

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Les Dogons sont un peuple du Mali, en Afrique de l'Ouest. Leur population totale au Mali est estimée à 700 000 personnes[1]. Ils occupent la région, nommée Pays Dogon, qui va de la falaise de Bandiagara au sud-ouest de la boucle du Niger. Quelques Dogons sont installés dans le nord du Burkina Faso, d'autres se sont installés en Côte d'Ivoire.

Les Dogons sont avant tout des cultivateurs (essentiellement du mil) et des forgerons. Ils sont réputés pour leur cosmogonie et leurs sculptures. La langue parlée par les Dogons est le dogon qui regroupe plusieurs dialectes. Il existe aussi une langue secrète, le sigi so, langue réservée à la société des masques. Les Dogons sont liés avec l’ethnie des Bozos par la parenté à plaisanterie. Dogons et Bozos se moquent réciproquement, mais parallèlement se doivent assistance.
Sommaire

Histoire

Les Dogons seraient venus du Mandé, région située au sud-ouest du Mali au XIVe siècle pour éviter l'islamisation.[2]), le plateau (région de Sangha) et la plaine.[3] Ils se seraient installés à Kani Bonzon avant de se disperser sur trois sites que sont la Falaise de Bandiagara (site mis en 2003 sur la liste mondiale du patrimoine de l'UNESCO. Cette falaise était alors habitée par les Tellem, portant aussi le nom de kurumba. D'après les Dogons, les Bana ont précédé les Tellem. Même s'ils ont longtemps subi la domination des divers peuples ayant créé de grands empires ou royaumes, les Dogons ont toujours su conserver leur indépendance à cause de la difficulté

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Cabinet of curiosities
 
"Musei Wormiani Historia", the frontispiece from the Museum Wormianum depicting Ole Worm's cabinet of curiosities.A Cabinet of curiosities was an encyclopedic collection in Renaissance Europe of types of objects whose categorical boundaries were yet to be defined. Modern terminology would categorize the objects included as belonging to natural history (sometimes faked), geology, ethnography, archaeology, religious or historical relics, works of art (including cabinet paintings) and antiquities. "The Kunstkammer was regarded as a microcosm or theater of the world, and a memory theater. The Kunstkammer conveyed symbolically the patron's control of the world through its indoor, microscopic reproduction." Of Charles I of England's collection, Peter Thomas has succinctly stated, "The Kunstkabinett itself was a form of propaganda"[2] Besides the most famous, best documented cabinets of rulers and aristocrats, members of the merchant class and early practitioners of science in Europe, formed collections that were precursors to museums. They were also known by various names such as Cabinet of Wonder, and in German Kunstkammer or Wunderkammer (wonder-room).

 History
The term cabinet originally described a room rather than a piece of furniture. The classic style of cabinet of curiosities emerged in the sixteenth century, although more rudimentary collections had existed earlier. The Kunstkammer of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor (ruled 1576-1612), housed in the Hradschin at Prague was unrivalled north of the Alps; it provided a solace and retreat for contemplation that also served to demonstrate his imperial magnificence and power in symbolic arrangement of their display, ceremoniously presented to visiting diplomats and magnates. Rudolf's uncle, Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria also had a collection, with a special emphasis on paintings of people with interesting deformities, which remains

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Cabinet de curiosités
 
Frontispice de Musei Wormiani Historia montrant l'intérieur du cabinet de curiosités de Worm.
Cabinet d'un particulier, Frans II Francken, 1625, Kunsthistorisches Museum, VienneUn cabinet de curiosités était un lieu où étaient entreposés et exposés des objets collectionnés, avec un certain goût pour l'hétéroclisme et l'inédit. On y trouvait couramment des médailles, des antiquités, des objets d'histoire naturelle (comme des animaux empaillés, des insectes séchés, des coquillages, des squelettes, des carapaces, des herbiers, des fossiles) ou des œuvres d'art.

Apparus à la Renaissance en Europe, les cabinets de curiosités sont l'ancêtre des musées et des muséums. Ils ont joué un rôle fondamental dans l'essor de la science moderne même s'ils gardaient les traces des croyances populaires de l'époque (il n'était pas rare d'y trouver du sang de dragon séché ou des squelettes d'animaux mythiques). L'édition de catalogues qui en faisaient l'inventaire, souvent illustrés, permettaient d'en diffuser le contenu auprès des savants européens.

Le principe du cabinet de curiosités a disparu durant le XIXe siècle, remplacé par des institutions officielles et les collections privées. Celles-ci ont joué encore un grand rôle dans certaines disciplines scientifiques comme l'entomologie ou la conchyliologie.


 Dans la recherche
Le sujet a été étudié par l'historien d'art viennois Julius von

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Who are the Baule?

About three million people living mainly in central Ivory Coast are defined as Baule. Yet after a closer study it semblairaient these men identify with villages or village clusters (ranging from 4 to 12) as an ethnic group. although the Baule ethnic reality remains msytérieuse can not be denying the existence of a style Baule. artists who use this style talk Baule and abroad their art is known as Baule for over a century.

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Image Coiffures africaines

Exhibition "African Hairstyles"

After the monographic exhibitions devoted to ethnic Mumuye and Bambara, the gallery's eye and the hand begins 2010 with an exhibition on the theme of the often overlooked African hairstyle. Often overlooked as belonging to the sphere of the arts "popular", hair is however of particular importance in Africa, both aesthetically and symbolically.

The hairstyle can both grow its appearance but also to affirm their identity or social status. Some hairstyles are immediately identifiable, such as hairstyling splayed Mangbetu of the Democratic Republic of Congo or the hairstyles solidified ocher Namibia. Others refer to a hierarchical system more complex. Ancient art, hair is also found in modern African art production, through paintings advertising kiosks hairdressers or barbers, or in African-American fashion. Both ornaments and symbols of identity, the hairstyles worn by different ethnic groups are reflected in their art. Although they represent gods or ancestors, masks and statues are the hairstyles of the living.

In Africa the hairstyle is still practiced by family members or trusted friends. In addition to the social aspects of the event, the hair, placed in the hands of enemies, could become an ingredient in the production of dangerous charms or "medicines" that could hurt their owners. Mostly it is women cap the women and men that cap men.

As scarification, hairstyles to identify gender, ethnicity, stage reached by the person in the cycle of life, status and personal taste. Scholars,

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STRENGTH AND MEASUREMENT

The discovery of "primitive art": an art of strength
Shapes and shape functions
Deities and ancestors
The living wood

Force and Measurement

Develop an aesthetic of black Africa is seen as a risky business in many ways. Is it legitimate to isolate these objects, that today we call art, the general framework of their relations and their cultural constraints? Can we submit to a test that has never existed in the minds of their creators? And can we finally see in this art - if we 'take on this term - a uniform phenomenon, despite the wide variety of both regional and local styles we offer this huge continent, following lengthy Historical developments often poorly understood? Finally, remember that this approach excludes large regions, including Africa white, that is to say the Mediterranean area with its ancient history, the eastern and southern Africa whose pastoral peoples have given rise to cultures almost without images, and finally these hunting societies, which, even in our time have not passed the stage of evolution of prehistoric rock paintings which are the main evidence of an artistic production that appears at various points the continent. Similarly, we must exclude from our contribution to the aesthetics of black African art the old feudal societies, including Benin. Our discussion is therefore limited to large areas farmers, the true cradle of

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AFRICAN SCULPTURE

Introduction
Context of African sculpture
Places of traditional African sculpture
Canons of African sculpture
Techniques and creative
Aesthetic
Role of African sculpture in the middle
Universal impact of African sculpture
Bibliographic


Introduction

Never has been written about as much ink as traditional African sculpture. Ever, despite all attempts, the man has managed to evacuate his mental field, much less its history, that is to say of his encounter with the other. It has been a cornerstone to measure the "civilization" of the black man and his ability to create capacity variously appreciated throughout history until early this century, cubism helping, the unanimously begins to make the exceptional nature of African sculpture that was always confused with African art which it is a party, probably the most important, if one were to judge solely by the number Parts created that we have reached.

Context of African sculpture

We can talk about African sculpture in isolation from the rest of the arts of Africa south of Sahara. Every word in this area is responsible not only meaningless but history, and if we chose the term "African art" is to fully assume all we have inherited from the past in

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