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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'cultures'

Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
€ 55,000.00
Art contemporain africain


L’Art contemporain africain est très dynamique. Il s'inspire aussi bien des traditions du continent que, et c'est de plus en plus le cas, des réalités urbaines contemporaines d'une Afrique en mutation, qui se cherche encore une identité. Les techniques et les supports sont variés, allant de la simple peinture aux installations avec projection vidéo, en passant par des sculptures faites en matériaux de récupération...
En 1989, l'exposition « Les magiciens de la terre » (Centre Pompidou, 1989) présentait des œuvres d'art africain contemporain (d'artistes vivants) pour la première fois en Europe, mode de monstration mettant en valeur un certain primitiviste et exotique. En 2005, l’exposition « Africa Remix » qui a été présentée en Allemagne, en Angleterre, en France et au Japon peut être considérée comme la première à présenter un panorama important de l'art contemporain spécifiquement africain, montrant surtout la richesse de l'art africain sub-saharien. Mais l'Afrique elle-même s'est dotée de centres d'art contemporain, de festivals ou biennales sont régulièrement organisés sur le continent pour mettre en valeur le talent des artistes d'aujourd'hui.

 Quelques artistes

Afrique du Sud

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Africa, Oceania and the Indigenous Americas


The Department oversees four separate collection segments: the arts of Africa, Egypt, the South Pacific and the Indigenous Americas. Reflecting current scholarship and geography, Egyptian art is now a sub-section of this department. African art thus consists of works from the rest of Africa other than Egypt.

African Art

The DIA’s African art collection ranks among the finest in the United States. It comprises some rare world-class works from nearly one hundred African cultures, predominantly from regions south of the Sahara desert. A diverse collection, ranging from sculpture to textiles to exquisite utilitarian wares, religious paraphernalia and bodily ornaments, it is heavily weighted toward the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

African art collecting is inextricably tied to the founding of the Detroit Institute of Arts at the turn of 20th century and remains one of the institution’s important hallmarks. From the late 1800s through the 1930s, generous contributions from some of Detroit’s first collectors, such as Frederick Stearns and Robert Tannahill, helped to develop the core collection. This included priceless works, such as several Benin royal brass sculptures, an exquisite 16th century Kongo Afro-Portuguese ivory knife container, a 17th century Owo ivory bracelet, a Kongo steatite funerary figure (ntadi) and a finely crafted Asante royal gold soul-washer’s badge recovered from the chamber of the nineteenth century Asante King, Kofi Karikari. Support from the City of Detroit has since aided the purchase of additional works of

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Masks

The viewing of masks is often restricted to certain peoples or places, even when used in performance, or masquerade. African masks manifest spirits of ancestors or nature as well as characters that are spiritual and social forces. During a masquerade, which is performed during ceremonial occasions such as agricultural, initiation, leadership and funerary rites, the mask becomes the otherworld being. When collected by Western cultures, masks are often displayed without their costume ensemble and lack the words, music and movement, or dance, that are integral to the context of African masquerades. Visually, masks are often a combination of human and animal traits. They can be made of wood, natural or man-made fibers, cloth and animal skin. Masks are usually worn with costumes and can, to some extent, be categorized by form, which includes face masks, crest masks, cap masks, helmet masks, shoulder masks, and fiber and body masks. Maskettes, which are shaped like masks, are smaller and are not worn on or over the face. They may be worn on an individual’s arm or hip or hung on a fence or other structure near the performance area.

Sculpture

The cultures of Africa have created a world-renowned tradition of three-dimensional and relief sculpture. Everyday and ceremonial works of great delicacy and surface detail are fashioned by artists using carving, modeling, smithing and casting techniques. Masks, figures, musical instruments, containers, furniture, tools and equipment are all part of the sculptor’s repertoire. The human figure is perhaps the most prominent sculptural form in Africa, as it has been for millennia. Male and female images in wood, ivory, bone, stone, earth, fired clay, iron and copper alloy embody cultural values, depict the ideal and represent spirits, ancestors and deities. Used in a broad range of contexts--initiation, healing, divination,
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At once beautiful, protective, seductive, and dangerous, the water spirit Mami Wata (Mother Water) is celebrated throughout much of Africa and the African Atlantic. A rich array of arts surrounds her, as well as a host of other aquatic spirits--all honoring the essential, sacred nature of water. Mami Wata is often portrayed as a mermaid, a snake charmer, or a combination of both. She is widely believed to have "overseas" origins, and her depictions have been profoundly influenced by representations of ancient, indigenous African water spirits, European mermaids, Hindu gods and goddesses, and Christian and Muslim saints. She is not only sexy, jealous, and beguiling but also exists in the plural, as the mami watas and papi watas who comprise part of the vast and uncountable "school" of African water spirits.

Mami Wata's presence is pervasive partly because she can bring good fortune in the form of money. As a "capitalist" deity par excellence, her persona developed between the fifteenth and twentieth centuries, the era of growing trade between Africa and the rest of the world. Her very name, which may be translated as "Mother Water," is pidgin English, a language developed to facilitate trade. Countless enslaved Africans forcibly brought to the Americas as part of this "trade" carried with them their beliefs, practices, and arts honoring water spirits such as Mami Wata. Reestablished, revisualized, and revitalized in the African Atlantic, Mami Wata emerged in new communities and under different guises, among them Lasirèn, Yemanja, Santa Marta la Dominadora, and Oxum. African--based
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Metisse world
edited by Serge Gruzinski


To Mix ot not to mix?

It is to dwell on the notion of miscegenation, topical if any, by confronting the reader to a series of oppositions common, calling into question the strong taste of the West for dualism: Classical / ethnic, antique / classic, original / first, folk / colonial, exotic / Typical ...

Open exhibition and publication on issues related to the idea of mixing that lead almost without transition, to an exploration of memory. These elements suggest to think logically about how to be "manufactured" objects mixed with it is often difficult to define the contours. They could be defined as the expression of a human creation that arose at the confluence of the Worlds and European companies in Asia, Africa and America. They are at the heart of a story that is played worldwide since the fifteenth century to the present.

After several steps that will reveal many little-known works, the course ends with an imaginary encounter with the contemporary Métis, particularly through Hollywood and Asian cinema.
Description

184 pages 24 x 26 cm

About 150 illustrations

Retail price: 45 €

Hardback

Isbn 978-2-7427-7344-2/978-2-915133-81-3

Co-published Branly / Actes Sud
curator

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What a body?


I have a body good to me, it seems, and that's because I'm me. I count among my properties and pretend to carry him on my full sovereignty. I think therefore unique and independent. But it is an illusion because there is no human society where it is believed that the body is worth by itself. Every body is created, not only by their fathers and mothers. It is not made by one who has it, but by others. No more in New Guinea, the Amazon or Africa than in Western Europe, it is thought as a thing. Instead, it is the particular form of relationship with the otherness that constitutes the person. Depending on the perspective of comparative anthropology adopted here is that other, respectively, the other sex, animal species, the dead or the divine (secularized in the modern age, in the teleology of living). Yes, my body is what reminds me that I find myself in a world populated by example, ancestors, gods, enemies or people of the opposite sex. My body really mine? It is he who I do not belong, I is not alone and that my destiny is to live in society.
Description

224 pages 24 x 26 cm

240 color illustrations

1 map

retail price: 45 €

isbn 2-915133-17-4

Co-published Branly / Flammarion
curator

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At a glance the Other


History of European eyes on Africa, America and Oceania

At a glance, and one devoted to successive visions brought by Europeans on the cultures of Africa, the Americas and Oceania. This program is a pretext to put into perspective by thematic series, the relativity of our eyes on the threshold of a new museum. Rather than return to the past, this catalog (and exhibition which is the source) marks a starting point.

From the Renaissance to today, the "idols of the Indians", "instruments of the natives," "primitive fetishes," "Negro Sculpture" or "first arts" were the witnesses of likes and dislikes, revealing reflections on otherness. The originality of this publication reflects historical depth that allows to include these objects in a broader history of art.

The Musée du Quai Branly appealed not only to works of other cultures, reflecting the first contacts with Europe, but also to European works within the midst of which they were placed. The catalog shows as well, in a strange series of chapters, how European eyes have gradually allowed other creations from, for example, curiosity amazed rankings systematic evolutionary wanderings of the images of the Universal.

Throughout the pages, the reader travels with the Nave of Charles V., Écouen treasure museum, portraits of Indians of Brazil painted in 1637 for the palace of the Prince of Nassau, rhinoceros horn cups Habsburg Pre-Columbian

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Ciwara


African chimeras

Masks, headdresses Ciwara are among the better known pieces of African art. Incomparable masterpieces cultures Bamana (Mali) and Senufo (Mali, Côte d'Ivoire), enigmatic and emblematic symbols of African art, clichés abound when talking about these famous head crests. There are few so-called traditional African sculptures which have aroused so much admiration from fans and collectors. This catalog is intended to fill this gap and provide a scientific focus on the subject. He cites the permeability of borders and artistic use of such objects do not come out only during agricultural rites but on several occasions during the year (entertainment, important ceremonies such as funerals, fight against bites snake, ...). It also highlights the richness of the museum, unique in international collections, with his fifty-five masks reproduced at the end of the book.
Description

96 pages format 20 x 26 cm

70 illustrations and 55 photos to the catalog raisonné

Maps

retail price: 25 €

isbn 2-915133-15-8 / 88-7439-318-0

Co-published Branly / 5 Continents
curator

Lorenz Homberger, Deputy Director of the Museum Rietberg, Zurich
authors

Jean-Paul Colleyn, study director at the EHESS

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Listed injured


Repair in Africa

Repair, mend, strengthen, seal ... Listed blessésaborde unexplored subject of compensation by local indigenous people. This publication opens a new perspective on African objects, and features 120 "objects wounded" among the 500 selected objects repaired Musée du Quai Branly. The catalog offers many points of view because every culture that gives the repair of objects, rituals or customary, a different form and meaning.

But he also wondered about the poetic nature of the restoration. In this supplement almost mystical power of life and that the gesture of the man gives the object, it seems permanently removed from the ephemeral. In addition, repair is a mark of authenticity, if indeed we do not seek to falsify it.

The first section defines the meaning of the word "reparation" in French as well as in a number of African languages. Are then highlighted the differences between repair and restoration. Finally ethnological thinking is the act of reparation in the complex life of the object.

The second part explores the meaning of compensation for the three main religions in the continent: animism, Islam and Christianity.

The third part raises a more analytical, the question of compensation for three different cultures: Maghreb, Dogon, Gabon.

The final text shows the importance of the concepts of tear and repair in contemporary Western art.
Description

96 pages

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Tangle of ropes, accumulation of disparate elements, small heaps unspeakable, are the objects of divination in Africa in this book. These figures of the formless, sometimes perceived as loathsome and strange, are much more familiar we suppose at first, and do not speak of anything but life and countless son's existence, which continue to establish and discard. It is not that of any tribute to Africa and mysterious fetish, but to honor human creativity and variety of forms it knows borrow.

Exposure. Musée du Quai Branly (2009) Recipes of the Gods: the fetish aesthetic Actes Sud € 19.90
Group under the leadership of Jacques Kerchache African Art & Citadels Mazenod € 199.00
Faik-Nzuji, Clementine M. African Arts: signs and symbols boeck From € 42.00
Collective Imprints of Africa: African Art, Modern Art Workshop € 9.91
Basson, Mbog Aesthetics of African Art: The Symbolic and complexity Harmattan € 21.00
Diagne, Souleymane Bachir Leopold Sedar Senghor, African art as philosophy: an essay Riveneuve € 15.00
Exposure. Afrikamuseum (2007-2008) Ubangi, art and culture in the heart of South Africa Acts € 99.95
Alain Lecomte art, magic and medicine in Black Africa Gallery Alain Lecomte € 35.00
Exposure. Dapper Foundation (2007-2008) Musée Dapper Pet € 45.00
Exposure.

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Image Motherhoods

MOTHERHOODS

 

ART GALLERY L'OEIL ET LA MAIN

41 RUE DE VERNEUIL 75007 PARIS

 EXHIBITION FROM THE 4TH OF JUNE TO THE 30TH OF SEPTEMBER 2009

 WWW.AFRICAN-PARIS.COM


The image of the mother carrying her child is very present in Westerner imaginary, reflecting the importance of the woman not only in her wife role, but also as a mother. In addition to their social and economic importance, the African mothers also have a quasi-magic capacity. The birth is indeed regarded as a godsend, because this is the child who later will take care of his/her parents, become old, and will work for them as they worked for him. Moreover, in many cultures, the woman is often a priestess specialist in the rites and a person in charge of the worship, and many spirits are female ones. This fact partly explains the importance of the female image in the African sculpture. Although a child is raised by the members of the family extended, the link between him/her and his/her mother remains very strong, especially at the period of early childhood, the carved works presented at the time of this exhibition are a proof of that fact. Motherhood represents the female principle par excellence. But are african motherhoods statues of mother with child or statues of mother and child? Which are the relationships between the mother and the child in a sculpture of motherhood?

Very often mother and child do not set up a
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Qu’est-ce que les « arts premiers » ?
Expertise
jeudi 24 août 2006, par Nélia Dias

Source du document : Sciences Humaines
Auteur : Nélia Dias
Descriptif :

Sciences Humaines est un magazine de vulgarisation scientifique spécialisé dans les sciences de l’homme et de la société, qui existe depuis 1991.

Si la notion d’« arts premiers » n’est pas inscrite aujourd’hui au fronton du musée du Quai-Branly, c’est que de « premier » à « primitif », il n’y avait qu’un mauvais pas à franchir. Or un « musée des cultures du monde » ne peut plus être celui d’un regard colonial dépassé (Hors-Série n°3 de Sciences Humaines, juin 2006)
Nélia Dias est Professeur à l’Institut des sciences du travail et de l’entreprise de Lisbonne, elle a publié notamment « Ethnographie, arts et arts premiers : la question des désignations » (in collectif, Les Arts premiers, fondation Calouste-Gulbenkian, 2003)

Depuis une dizaine d'années, on assiste en France à un engouement nouveau mais controversé pour les « arts premiers », qui se manifeste dans les sphères de la presse, de l'édition, sur les rayons des librairies de musées, comme au Louvre, dans les ventes aux enchères et les expositions [1] .

D'où vient cet intérêt récent pour les arts non occidentaux ? Que recouvre la désignation « arts premiers » ? Comment expliquer ce que l'historien de l'art Ernst Gombrich appelait une « préférence pour le primitif [2] [2]  » ? Entraîne-t-elle le rejet de quelque
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Qu’est-ce que les « arts premiers » ?
Expertise
jeudi 24 août 2006, par Nélia Dias

Source du document : Sciences Humaines
Auteur : Nélia Dias
Descriptif :

Sciences Humaines est un magazine de vulgarisation scientifique spécialisé dans les sciences de l’homme et de la société, qui existe depuis 1991.


Si la notion d’« arts premiers » n’est pas inscrite aujourd’hui au fronton du musée du Quai-Branly, c’est que de « premier » à « primitif », il n’y avait qu’un mauvais pas à franchir. Or un « musée des cultures du monde » ne peut plus être celui d’un regard colonial dépassé (Hors-Série n°3 de Sciences Humaines, juin 2006)
Nélia Dias est Professeur à l’Institut des sciences du travail et de l’entreprise de Lisbonne, elle a publié notamment « Ethnographie, arts et arts premiers : la question des désignations » (in collectif, Les Arts premiers, fondation Calouste-Gulbenkian, 2003)


Depuis une dizaine d'années, on assiste en France à un engouement nouveau mais controversé pour les « arts premiers », qui se manifeste dans les sphères de la presse, de l'édition, sur les rayons des librairies de musées, comme au Louvre, dans les ventes aux enchères et les expositions [1] .

D'où vient cet intérêt récent pour les arts non occidentaux ? Que recouvre la désignation « arts premiers » ? Comment expliquer ce que l'historien de l'art Ernst Gombrich appelait une « préférence pour le primitif [2] [2]  » ? Entraîne-t-elle le rejet de quelque alternative
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De l’africanisme aux études africaines Textes et « humanités » Alain Ricard Tout discours sur l'Afrique, et en particulier l'Afrique noire, ne peut il relever que de la passion, voire de lacompassion ? N’y a t-il que les fous d’Afrique – titre d’un livre récent – pour s’intéresser à elle ? Quelles formes de raison peut-il convoquer ?La première qui se présenta fut géographique. Sorte de page blanche de notre humanité jusqu'au XIXe siècle, l'Afrique a été inscrite avec nos routes, nos cartes, nos frontières ; aujourd'hui, les images satellitaires ne nous en laisentrien ignorer. Nous savons au mètre près ce qui se passe à Kisangani en guerre, là où Stanley donna à des chutes son nom : il avait compris que cette courbe du fleuve Congo était le centre du continent, il pensait en géographe et en stratège... Cette Afrique des images reste face à nous, extérieure : ne relève-t-elle pas aussi d'autres formes de raison plus intérieures, voire existentielles ? Quel immense murmure monte de la forêt ? Que dit-il ? Ces Africains ne sont-ils qued'empruntés francophones ou de pompeux anglophones ? Des bégayeurs maladroits ou des volubiles irresponsables ?L'inscription géographique, qui en reste à l'image, est trop facilement la proie de la marchandise. Aujourd'hui il nous faut le son, le discours. Des langues en expansion composent d'autres circulations que nous ne capterons pas avec nos satellites. Il nous faut passer de l'œil à l'oreille, du regard à l'écoute... Les blancs des cartes Les sciences humaines redécouvrent l’afrique, titrait un journal du soir après un colloque tenu à Nantes – « Les sciences de l’homme

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Marcel Griaule

Marcel Griaule (1898 – 1956) was a French anthropologist known for his studies of the Dogon people of West Africa, and for pioneering ethnographic field studies in France.

Born in Ainsy-sur-Armençon, Griaule received a good education and was preparing to become an engineer and enrolled at the prestigious Lycée Louis-le-Grand when in 1917 at the end of World War I he volunteered to become a pilot in the French Air Force.

In 1920 he returned to university, where he attended the lectures of Marcel Mauss and Marcel Cohen. Intrigued by anthropology, he gave up plans for a technical career. In 1927 he received a degree from the École Nationale de Langues Orientales, where he concentrated on Amharic and Gueze.

Between 1928 and 1933 Griaule participated in two large-scale ethnographic expeditions -- one to Ethiopia and the ambitious Dakar to Djibouti expedition which crossed Africa. On the latter expedition he first visited the Dogon, the ethnic group with whom he would be for ever associated.

In 1933 he received a diploma from the École Pratique des Hautes Études in religion.

Throughout the 1930s Griaule and his student Germaine Dieterlen undertook several group expeditions to the Dogon area in Mali. During these trips Griaule pioneered the use of aerial photography,
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Royaume d'Aksoum

Aksoum jouait un rôle important dans le commerce international dès le Ier siècle de notre ère (voir le Périple de la mer Érythrée) jusqu'à ce que, vers la fin de la Ier millénaire, il succombe aux différentes puissances régionales islamiques qui s'étaient liguées contre elle.

Le Royaume d'Aksoum ou Empire Aksoumite était un royaume commercial important dans le nord-est de l'Afrique, qui s'est développé à partir du IVe siècle av. J.-C. pour atteindre son apogée au Ier siècle. Son ancienne capitale, Aksoum, se situait au nord de l'actuelle Éthiopie. Le royaume utilisa le nom "Ethiopie" dès le IVe siècle.Il est également le lieu présumé où repose l'Arche d'alliance et la maison de la reine de Saba. Aksoum a été également le premier grand empire à se convertir au christianisme.

Histoire

Origines

Aksoum fut longtemps considérée comme ayant été fondée par des sabéens de langue sémitique qui auraient traversé la Mer Rouge en venant d'Arabie du Sud (l'actuel Yémen), mais la plupart des chercheurs s'entendent maintenant pour dire que ce fut un développement autochtone.[4] En effet, il existait l'ancien royaume D'mt (ou Da'amot), avant toute migration sabéenne au IVe et Ve siècle av. J.-C.En outre, le Guèze, l'ancienne langue sémitique d'Érythrée et d'Éthiopie, est maintenant connue pour ne pas avoir dérivé de la langue de Saba et il y a des signes de présence de langues sémitiques en Éthiopie et en Érythrée au moins 2000 ans av. J.-C.. L'influence du Royaume de Saba semble
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Africa

Africa is the world's second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4% of the total land area. With a billion people (as of 2009, see table) in 61 territories, it accounts for about 14.8% of the World's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Suez Canal and the Red Sea to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Not counting the disputed territory of Western Sahara, there are 53 countries, including Madagascar and various island groups, associated with the continent.

Africa, particularly central eastern Africa, is widely regarded within the scientific community to be the origin of humans and the Hominidae tree (great apes), as evidenced by the discovery of the earliest hominids and their ancestors, as well as later ones that have been dated to around seven million years ago – including Sahelanthropus tchadensis, Australopithecus africanus, A. afarensis, Homo erectus, H. habilis and H. ergaster – with the earliest Homo sapiens (human) found in Ethiopia being dated to ca. 200,000 years ago.

Africa straddles the equator and encompasses numerous climate areas; it is the only continent to stretch from the northern temperate to southern temperate zones.

Etymology

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Masques du Gabon

Les masques traditionnels ont toujours tenu une place importante au sein des cultures gabonaises. Chaque ethnie a les siens, dédiés à des cérémonies variées mais toutes importantes dans le rythme de vie de ces populations.

Masque Okuyi

Les masques Okuyi sont utilisés dans la tribu Myénée. Ils sont utilisés pour accompagner les funérailles ou les retraits de deuil.

Symbolique et utilisation

Ce sont des masques d'ancêtres. Ils expriment la sérénité de leurs anciens qui les protègent et les conseillent depuis le royaume des morts. Le porteur du masque est recouvert d'un costume de raphia. Durant les cérémonies, il pousse des cris sauvages destinés à effrayer les spectateurs.

Les masques noirs sont quant à eux probablement dotés d'une fonction judiciaire.

Caractéristiques

Masque anthropomorphe blanc, sa face est peinte au kaolin. La couleur blanche du kaolin est
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African traditional religion

African traditional religions, also referred to as African indigenous religions or African tribal religions, is a term referring to a variety of religions indigenous to the continent of Africa. Like tribal religions from other parts of the world, African religious traditions are defined largely along community lines.

Traditional African religions involve teachings, practices, and rituals that lend structure to indigenous African societies. These traditional African religions also play a large part in the cultural understanding and awareness of the people of their communities.


African Traditional Religion and Language

Most traditional African religions have, for most of their existence, been orally/spiritually (rather than scripturally) transmitted. Thus, linguistic experts such as Christopher Ehret and Placide Tempels have applied their knowledge of languages towards reconstructing the original core beliefs of the followers of these traditions. The four linguistic phylums spoken in Africa are: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Congo, and Khoi-San.

Afro-Asiatic Spirituality

According to linguist Christopher Ehret, traditional religion among Afro-Asiatic-speaking (Afrasan) peoples was originally henotheistic in nature. In this sense, each clan gave
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Tombouctou

Tombouctou (Timbuktu ou Tin-Buktu en tamasheq) est une ville située sur le fleuve Niger au Mali. Elle est surnommée « la ville aux 333 saints » et « la perle du désert ».

Tombouctou est aussi le nom d'une des huit régions qui composent le Mali et le gouverneur de cette région siège dans la ville du même nom.

Étymologie

Le nom « Tombouctou » viendrait du tamasheq, langue des Touareg qui auraient fondé la ville au XIIe siècle, de Tin (ou Tim), qui signifie « puits» ou « lieu », et de Bouctou, nom donné à la femme présente à l'arrivée des Touareg, gardienne d'un puits, et qui désignerait une personne originaire d’Essouk – ce qui donne « le lieu de Bouctou ». À cette étymologie proposée par Abderrahamne es-Saâdi au XVIIe siècle dans son Tarikh es-Sudan (Histoire du Soudan), l’explorateur allemand Heinrich Barth au XIXe siècle, lui, donne une origine songhaï du mot Tombouctou qui désignerait une « dépression entre les dunes ».

Histoire

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