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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
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Dyonyeni (or Jonyeleni) statue, Bambara, Mali
Dyonyeni (or Jonyeleni) statue, Bambara, Mali
€ 35,000.00
Gelede mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
Gelede mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
€ 22,000.00

Primitive arts: political nomenclature or singular art?

Eugene Berg
Diplomat, former ambassador to Namibia, Botswana and Fiji. Author of 'Non-alignment and
New World Order '(PUF, 1980),' The International Politics since 1955 '(Economica, 1990) and' Chronology
internati''o''nale: 1945-1997 '(PUF, "Que sais-je?", 4th ed, 1997). Works since No. 19-20 to review work
made in the journal 'The Banquet'.

The inauguration of the Musée du Quai Branly, just as the opening
second France-Oceania summit, was a highlight of the cultural
quinquennium of Jacques Chirac. He will no doubt what would have been the Centre
Beaubourg Georges Pompidou, Musée d'Orsay for Valery Giscard
d'Estaing and Francois Mitterand National Library for. Expresses this
place that has done since its opening subject to real and sustained enthusiasm
People and challenges no less significant part of the community
scientific and museum? As written immediately Berenice
Geoffroy-Schneiter, this is "no accident that our west in search of
Spirituality landmarks and turns to these desperate travelers
the invisible. "

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“Africa Remix” featured the work of over 100 African artists in a 2,200-sq.m exhibition space. With paintings by Chéri Samba, installations by Barthélémy Toguo, drawings by Frédéric Bruly Bouabré and photographs by Guy Tillim, “Africa Remix” revealed the varied facets of Africa’s contemporary arts scene.

The exhibition examined contemporary African art not only from an aesthetic angle but also from historical, political and ideological perspectives.

- Total pledges support for African art with the ”Africa Remix” exhibition in Paris -

So near, and yet so far: Africa is an enigma that continues to exert a strange fascination for many. “Africa Remix” was an invitation to reflect on what Africa really means – to explore and rediscover it by straying from the beaten path of commonplace ideas and platitudes. As Total has a strong presence in Africa, we are all too aware of the difficulties affecting the continent, but we’re also committed to bringing African culture the recognition it deserves.

Africa Remix

Under the artistic direction of Simon Njami (photo), an international team of curators (see dates and facts as well as the photo) has assembled this overview of the artistic production in Africa and the African diaspora. 88 artists show works from the last 10 years, among them several specially
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African art

African art constitutes one of the most diverse legacies on earth. Though many casual observers tend to generalize "traditional" African art, the continent is full of peoples, societies, and civilizations, each with a unique visual special culture. The definition also includes the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.

    * Emphasis on the human figure: The human figure has always been a the primary subject matter for most African art, and this emphasis even influenced certain European traditions. For example in the fifteenth century Portugal traded with the Sapi culture near the Ivory Coast in West Africa, who created elaborate ivory saltcellars that were hybrids of African and European designs, most notably in the addition of the human figure (the human figure typically did not appear in Portuguese saltcellars). The human figure may symbolize the living or the dead, may reference chiefs, dancers, or various trades such as drummers or hunters, or even may be an anthropomorphic representation of a god or have other votive function. Another common theme is the inter-morphosis of human and animal.

Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. 12th century A.D.

    * Visual abstraction: African artworks tend to favor visual abstraction over naturalistic representation. This is because many African artworks generalize stylistic norms. Ancient Egyptian art, also usually thought of as naturalistically depictive, makes use of highly abstracted and regimented visual canons, especially in painting, as well as the use of different colors to represent the qualities and characteristics of an individual being depicted.

    * Emphasis on sculpture: African artists
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Africa, Oceania and the Indigenous Americas


The Department oversees four separate collection segments: the arts of Africa, Egypt, the South Pacific and the Indigenous Americas. Reflecting current scholarship and geography, Egyptian art is now a sub-section of this department. African art thus consists of works from the rest of Africa other than Egypt.

African Art

The DIA’s African art collection ranks among the finest in the United States. It comprises some rare world-class works from nearly one hundred African cultures, predominantly from regions south of the Sahara desert. A diverse collection, ranging from sculpture to textiles to exquisite utilitarian wares, religious paraphernalia and bodily ornaments, it is heavily weighted toward the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

African art collecting is inextricably tied to the founding of the Detroit Institute of Arts at the turn of 20th century and remains one of the institution’s important hallmarks. From the late 1800s through the 1930s, generous contributions from some of Detroit’s first collectors, such as Frederick Stearns and Robert Tannahill, helped to develop the core collection. This included priceless works, such as several Benin royal brass sculptures, an exquisite 16th century Kongo Afro-Portuguese ivory knife container, a 17th century Owo ivory bracelet, a Kongo steatite funerary figure (ntadi) and a finely crafted Asante royal gold soul-washer’s badge recovered from the chamber of the nineteenth century Asante King, Kofi Karikari. Support from the City of Detroit has since aided the purchase of additional works of

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Treasures marks the National Museum of African Art's 25th anniversary as a Smithsonian museum. The first in a new exhibition series, Treasuresis an old-fashioned show about African art, reminiscent of the exhibitions that represented avant-garde opinions of the early 20th century. In 1926, Paul Guillaume, Parisian connoisseur and collector, cautioned readers to defer learning about the history and meaning of African art until they had studied African art purely as an art form, because to do otherwise "tends to obscure one's vision of the objects as sculpture."

I chose the familiar--traditional sculpture--to reveal aesthetic variances, to see African art as form, not function. Treasures, therefore, is about visual exploration and aesthetic discovery. Our understanding of African art is prescribed by what we see, and often, what we see is based on works displayed in museums. So, "Treasures" is just that--a sampling that gives us a peek into the realm of African art.

Westerners and Africans alike revere well-made form. Each admires skillful technique and execution, exquisitely rendered forms, pattern, balance, symmetry, surface treatments and a sense of completeness. African artists, however, strive to portray more than that. As metaphor or symbol, their artworks embody the world of ideas and beliefs--confirming their notions about themselves, life and death, the universe and the spiritual realm. Yet, despite our cultural presumptions that separate art from life, often separating aesthetics from meaning, and our ignorance of or indifference to what it means and how it is used, African art astonishes.

An eclectic display of sculptures from East, West, Central, and southern Africa created between the 15th

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The Age of Jazz

exhibition poster's century jazz


Garden Gallery

exhibition ticket or ticket matched

March 17 to June 28, 2009


Commissioner Daniel Soutif

Jazz, along with film and rock, one of the major artistic events of the twentieth century. This hybrid music marked the global culture of its sounds and rhythms.

The exhibition, designed by the philosopher and art critic Daniel Soutif, presented in chronological relations between jazz and graphic arts throughout the twentieth century.

From painting to photography, from cinema to literature, not to mention the graphic or comic book, the exhibition shows more particularly the development of jazz in Europe and France in the 30 and 40.


e route of exposure

Life, 1 July 1926 (FG Cooper, 1926) © Collection Philippe Baudoin
Life, 1 July 1926 (FG Cooper, 1926) © Collection Philippe Baudoin

The exhibition is divided into ten chronological sections connected by a "timeline", vertical window through which the exhibition will bring together works, objects and documents, scores illustrated posters, records and folders, pictures ... entrusted to evoke directly the main events in the history of jazz.

This structured timeline by year is the common thread of

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Ciwara


African chimeras

Masks, headdresses Ciwara are among the better known pieces of African art. Incomparable masterpieces cultures Bamana (Mali) and Senufo (Mali, Côte d'Ivoire), enigmatic and emblematic symbols of African art, clichés abound when talking about these famous head crests. There are few so-called traditional African sculptures which have aroused so much admiration from fans and collectors. This catalog is intended to fill this gap and provide a scientific focus on the subject. He cites the permeability of borders and artistic use of such objects do not come out only during agricultural rites but on several occasions during the year (entertainment, important ceremonies such as funerals, fight against bites snake, ...). It also highlights the richness of the museum, unique in international collections, with his fifty-five masks reproduced at the end of the book.
Description

96 pages format 20 x 26 cm

70 illustrations and 55 photos to the catalog raisonné

Maps

retail price: 25 €

isbn 2-915133-15-8 / 88-7439-318-0

Co-published Branly / 5 Continents
curator

Lorenz Homberger, Deputy Director of the Museum Rietberg, Zurich
authors

Jean-Paul Colleyn, study director at the EHESS

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Ideqqi


Art of Berber women

The catalog produced for the exhibition Ideqqi, art of Berber women, is the first paper on the art of pottery Berber in Algeria, specifically female. It is based on the collections of the Musée du Quai Branly, particularly rich.

After an introduction by Marie-France Vivier, curator, Ernest Hamel provides a historical overview of Kabyle pottery, while Claude Presset through iconography selected, moved the manufacturing steps, from mixing to baking.
Dalila Marsly texts have different functions exhibits, including through their household.
The final text by Marie-France Vivier allows the reader to understand the symbolism of the sets, by drawing some comparisons with, for example, tattoos of Kabyle women photographed there are more than forty years by Marc Garanger.


Description

    
* 96 pages format 20 x 26 cm
    
* 62 color plates and 97 vignettes (catalog raisonné)
    
* 3 maps

Retail price: 25 €

isbn 2-915133-59-2 / 978-88-7439-381-7

Co-published Branly / 5 Continents
curator

Marie-France Vivier, honorary curator, collections manager of Northern Africa at the Musée du Quai Branly. She is the author of A Passion for African Art (Joel Cuenot, 2005), Algeria, women's memory

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Wassily Kandinsky

Birth name     Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky
Born     4 December 1866
Moscow
Died     13 December 1944 (aged 77)
Neuilly-sur-Seine
Nationality     Russian

Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky (Russian: Васи́лий Васи́льевич Канди́нский, Vasilij Vasil'evič Kandinskij; 4 December [O.S. 4 December] 1866 – 13 December 1944) was a Russian painter, and art theorist. He is regarded as the founder of abstract art and is, moreover, the chief theoretician of this type of painting.Template:Fact quoted from "Kandinsky" by Burkhard Riemschneider  1994 Benedikt Taschen Verlag GmbH

Born in Moscow, Kandinsky spent his childhood in Odessa. He enrolled at the University of Moscow and chose to study law and economics. Quite successful in his profession—he was offered a professorship (chair of Roman Law) at the University of Dorpat—he started painting studies (life-drawing, sketching and anatomy) at the age of 30.

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A little history ...

In 1981, during the opening of the gallery Amber, that arises the idea of gathering around the opening five to six colleagues antique arts primary and thus offer the public the first "Open House on non-European art "at the Sablon.

The project is successful, the key to success ... The idea was encrusted to the point of other galleries, Belgian and foreign.

In 1988, a pamphlet modest rally materializes this antique constantly growing, and three years later, the first edition of a catalog reflects the success of this consortium of antique dealers mobilized to the same object: to promote the exceptional richness of the arts which they are the first ambassadors.

Since 1996, antique Brussels even invited into their local foreign colleagues. Today, galleries French, Italian, Spanish, English, Dutch and American joined the event, giving an international dimension.

The Brussels Non European Art Fair has become one of the most important manifestations of non-European art, covering sectors as diverse as African art, Oceanic art, Indonesian art, pre-Columbian art or the Asian art and the art of Australian Aborigines.

Sculptures, masks, fetishes, guns, jewelry, coins, textiles, traditional objects carried by people for their use, wood, metal, gold, silver, bronze, ivory and terra cotta, the exhibits are ritual or domestic alliance shape and ornament.

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Primitive arts in Kaos
Le Journal des Arts - n ° 220 - September 9, 2005

The young Parisian journey Kaos has quickly become the global meeting place among lovers of primitive art. With a fourth edition even richer.
It took only two years at Kaos-Course Worlds in Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, home of the primitive arts, to win. Modeled on that of Bruneaf Brussels (Brussels Non European Art Fair), Kaos is an open event bringing together specialist dealers concentrated in one area (ie, exhibiting in their walls or hosted by other galleries). But while Bruneaf is losing momentum in recent years, Kaos is getting stronger. Created in 2002 from an idea by Rik Gadella (among other founder of Paris Photo), the appointment of Parisian art lovers first hosted the first year 21 galleries around the axis of the Rue de Seine, then 40 participants in 2003. The formula took off in 2004 with 51 exhibitors from around the world and has already reached international fame. This latest edition was also shown the excesses of the success of Kaos: merchants had refused leased spaces on the course to enjoy the commercial success generated by the event. Without dwelling on the subject, "not to do their advertising, its management announced a reinforcement of the signage" Kaos "to foreclose any parasites.

Must
This year, 55 galleries will open the festivities on the evening of Sept. 14, in a friendly atmosphere that gives the event a very special charm

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De l’africanisme aux études africaines Textes et « humanités » Alain Ricard Tout discours sur l'Afrique, et en particulier l'Afrique noire, ne peut il relever que de la passion, voire de lacompassion ? N’y a t-il que les fous d’Afrique – titre d’un livre récent – pour s’intéresser à elle ? Quelles formes de raison peut-il convoquer ?La première qui se présenta fut géographique. Sorte de page blanche de notre humanité jusqu'au XIXe siècle, l'Afrique a été inscrite avec nos routes, nos cartes, nos frontières ; aujourd'hui, les images satellitaires ne nous en laisentrien ignorer. Nous savons au mètre près ce qui se passe à Kisangani en guerre, là où Stanley donna à des chutes son nom : il avait compris que cette courbe du fleuve Congo était le centre du continent, il pensait en géographe et en stratège... Cette Afrique des images reste face à nous, extérieure : ne relève-t-elle pas aussi d'autres formes de raison plus intérieures, voire existentielles ? Quel immense murmure monte de la forêt ? Que dit-il ? Ces Africains ne sont-ils qued'empruntés francophones ou de pompeux anglophones ? Des bégayeurs maladroits ou des volubiles irresponsables ?L'inscription géographique, qui en reste à l'image, est trop facilement la proie de la marchandise. Aujourd'hui il nous faut le son, le discours. Des langues en expansion composent d'autres circulations que nous ne capterons pas avec nos satellites. Il nous faut passer de l'œil à l'oreille, du regard à l'écoute... Les blancs des cartes Les sciences humaines redécouvrent l’afrique, titrait un journal du soir après un colloque tenu à Nantes – « Les sciences de l’homme

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Jacques Chirac

22nd President of the French Republic
5th President of the Fifth Republic
Co-Prince of Andorra
In office
17 May 1995 – 16 May 2007
Prime Minister     Alain Juppé
Lionel Jospin
Jean-Pierre Raffarin
Dominique de Villepin
Preceded by     François Mitterrand
Succeeded by     Nicolas Sarkozy
Mayor of Paris
In office
20 March 1977 – 16 May 1995
Preceded by     Office Created
Succeeded by     Jean Tiberi
159th Prime Minister of France
10th Prime Minister of Fifth Republic
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Jean Rouch

Jean Rouch (Paris - 31 May 1917, Niger - 18 February 2004) was a French filmmaker and anthropologist.

He is considered to be one of the founders of the cinéma vérité in France, sharing the aesthetics of the direct cinema in the US pionered by Richard Leacock,D.A. Pennebaker and Albert and David Maysles. Rouch's practice as a filmmaker for over sixty years in Africa, was characterized by the idea of shared anthropology. Influenced by his discovery of surealism in his early twenties, many of his films blur the line between fiction and documentary, creating a new style of ethnofiction. He was also hailed by the French New Wave as one of theirs. His seminal film Me a Black (Moi un Noir) pionered the technique of jump cut popularized by Jean-Luc Godard. Godard said of Rouch in the Cahiers du Cinéma (Notebooks on Cinema) n°94 April 1959 "In charge of research for the Musée de l'Homme (French, "Museum of Man") Is there a better definition for a filmmaker?". Along his career, Rouch was no stranger to controversy. He would often repeat "Glory to he who brings dispute".

Biography

He began his long association with African subjects in 1941 after working as civil engineer supervising a construction project in Niger. However, shortly afterwards he returned to France to participate in the Resistance. After the war, he did a brief stint as a journalist with Agence France-Presse before returning to Africa where he become an influential anthropologist and sometimes controversial
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Carbon-14

Carbon-14, 14C, or radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon discovered on February 27, 1940, by Martin Kamen and Sam Ruben at the University of California Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, though its existence had been suggested already in 1934 by Franz Kurie. Its nucleus contains 6 protons and 8 neutrons. Its presence in organic materials is the basis of the radiocarbon dating method to date archaeological, geological, and hydrogeological samples.

There are three naturally occurring isotopes of carbon on Earth: 99% of the carbon is carbon-12, 1% is carbon-13, and carbon-14 occurs in trace amounts, e.g. making up as much as 1 part per trillion (0.0000000001%) of the carbon in the atmosphere. The half-life of carbon-14 is 5,730±40 years. It decays into nitrogen-14 through beta decay. The activity of the modern radiocarbon standard is about 14 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per gram carbon.

The atomic mass of carbon-14 is about 14.003241 amu. The different isotopes of carbon do not differ appreciably in their chemical properties. This is used in chemical research in a technique called carbon labeling: some carbon-12 atoms of a given compound are replaced with carbon-14 atoms (or some carbon-13 atoms) in order to trace them along chemical reactions involving the given compound.

Origin and radioactive decay

Carbon-14 is produced in the upper layers of the troposphere and the stratosphere by
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Africa

Africa is the world's second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4% of the total land area. With a billion people (as of 2009, see table) in 61 territories, it accounts for about 14.8% of the World's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Suez Canal and the Red Sea to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Not counting the disputed territory of Western Sahara, there are 53 countries, including Madagascar and various island groups, associated with the continent.

Africa, particularly central eastern Africa, is widely regarded within the scientific community to be the origin of humans and the Hominidae tree (great apes), as evidenced by the discovery of the earliest hominids and their ancestors, as well as later ones that have been dated to around seven million years ago – including Sahelanthropus tchadensis, Australopithecus africanus, A. afarensis, Homo erectus, H. habilis and H. ergaster – with the earliest Homo sapiens (human) found in Ethiopia being dated to ca. 200,000 years ago.

Africa straddles the equator and encompasses numerous climate areas; it is the only continent to stretch from the northern temperate to southern temperate zones.

Etymology

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African traditional religion

African traditional religions, also referred to as African indigenous religions or African tribal religions, is a term referring to a variety of religions indigenous to the continent of Africa. Like tribal religions from other parts of the world, African religious traditions are defined largely along community lines.

Traditional African religions involve teachings, practices, and rituals that lend structure to indigenous African societies. These traditional African religions also play a large part in the cultural understanding and awareness of the people of their communities.


African Traditional Religion and Language

Most traditional African religions have, for most of their existence, been orally/spiritually (rather than scripturally) transmitted. Thus, linguistic experts such as Christopher Ehret and Placide Tempels have applied their knowledge of languages towards reconstructing the original core beliefs of the followers of these traditions. The four linguistic phylums spoken in Africa are: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Congo, and Khoi-San.

Afro-Asiatic Spirituality

According to linguist Christopher Ehret, traditional religion among Afro-Asiatic-speaking (Afrasan) peoples was originally henotheistic in nature. In this sense, each clan gave
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Mali Empire

The Mali Empire or Manding Empire or Manden Kurufa was a West African civilization of the Mandinka from c. 1230 to c. 1600. The empire was founded by Sundiata Keita and became renowned for the wealth of its rulers, especially Mansa Musa I. The Mali Empire had many profound cultural influences on West Africa allowing the spread of its language, laws and customs along the Niger River. The Mali empire extended over an area larger than western Europe and consisted of numerous vassal kingdoms and provinces.

Manden

1235-1600's. The Mali Empire grew out of an area referred to by its contemporary inhabitants as Manden. Manden, named for its inhabitants the Mandinka (initially Manden’ka with “ka” meaning people of), comprised most of present-day northern Guinea and southern Mali. The empire was originally established as a federation of Mandinka tribes called the Manden Kurufa (literally Manden Federation), but it later became an empire ruling millions of people from nearly every ethnic group in West Africa.

Etymology

The naming origins of the Mali Empire are complex and still debated in scholarly circles around the world. While the meaning of “Mali” is still contested, the process of how it entered the regional lexicon is not. As mentioned earlier, the Mandinka of the Middle Ages referred to their ethnic homeland as “Manden”.
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Image Claude Levi-Strauss
Claude Lévi-Strauss


20th-century philosophy
Full name     Claude Lévi-Strauss
Born     28 November 1908 (1908-11-28) (age 100)
Brussels, Belgium
School/tradition     Structuralism

Claude Lévi-Strauss; born 28 November 1908) is a French anthropologist.

Biography

Claude Lévi-Strauss, born in Brussels, grew up in Paris, living in a street of the 16th arrondissement named after the artist Nicolas Poussin, whose work he later admired and wrote about. Lévi-Strauss's father was also a painter, and Claude was born in Brussels because his father had taken a contract to paint there.

At the Sorbonne in Paris, Lévi-Strauss studied law and philosophy. After an epiphany resulting from a late night conversation strolling around the grounds of True's Yard, King's Lynn with renowned cryptozoologist Lewis Daly,he did not pursue his study of law but agrégated in philosophy in 1931. In 1935, after a few years of secondary-school teaching, he took up a last-minute offer to be part of a French cultural mission to Brazil in which he
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Image Paul Klee
Paul Klee

Born     18 December 1879
Münchenbuchsee bei Bern, Switzerland
Died     29 June 1940 (aged 60)
Muralto, Switzerland
Nationality     German/Swiss
Training     Academy of Fine Arts, Munich
Works     more than 10,000 paintings, drawings, and etchings, including The Twittering Machine (1922), Fish Magic (1925), Viaducts Break Ranks (1937).

Paul Klee (18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940) was a Swiss painter of German nationality. His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included expressionism, cubism, and surrealism. He was, as well, a student of orientalism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually mastered color theory, and wrote extensively about it. His works reflect his dry humor and his sometimes child-like perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and his musicality. He and his friend, the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the German Bauhaus school of art and architecture.

Early life and training
“     First of all, the art of living; then as my
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