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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'esprits'

Statue féminine Anjenu
Statue féminine Anjenu
€ 45,000.00
Ntomo mask, Bambara, Mali
Ntomo mask, Bambara, Mali
€ 6,000.00
Female Kifwebe mask, Songye, Democratic Republic of Congo
Female Kifwebe mask, Songye, Democratic Republic of Congo
€ 12,000.00

DE L'ART ANCIEN AFRICAIN, DE L'ETHNOLOGIE ET DU MUSEE: POUR UN RECENTREMENT DE L'ESTHETIQUE...


Au commencement était la nuit. Une longue nuit pour l'esthétique africaine. Ce fut le règne sans partage du musée dit «de séries», véritable vitrine du colonialisme, de confession évolutionniste et dont l'approche contextualiste célébrait l'Etrange, chantait l'Aventure et la Science. A cette époque point d'« objets », que des curiosités, trésors de guerre et pièces de laboratoires de chevronnés « Civilisateurs ». Il n'était pas rare alors, de voir des sculptures côtoyer dans les vitrines : cornes, peaux de bêtes et autres feuilles de palmier. Puis, il y eut le regard affûté d'une jeune génération d'artistes particulièrement douée et par ailleurs cruellement blasée, en quête de médecine pour un art européen las de son académisme figé. Cette génération vit dans ce fouillis les moyens d'une rédemption...

Une certaine révolution est venue corriger l'évidente injustice, consacrant depuis le siècle dernier des expositions à caractère esthétique pour la production africaine. Désormais, les objets, dans une dramaturgie suggérée par les seules qualités plastiques, invitent à un rapport nouveau. Exit la surabondance, la cacophonie et le "meurtre du vrai" que génère la tentative bancale de reconstitution de l'ailleurs fantasmé. Ici on ne rejoue pas le film de l'heureuse rencontre avortée entre "civilisés" et "primitifs". Nous avons les vrais Stars que sont les objets, mais d'une

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Image 7 spheres of power, Adrienne Jalbert
The art gallery L'Oeil et la Main, specialized in primitve arts, gives freehand to ADRIENNE JALBERT for a confrontation which will not fail to cause the interest and curiosity.

Adrienne Jalbert, artist of international reputation, had been bitten by this young gallery, established in a small calm street behind the museum of Orsay. Having worked much on the idea of the sphere, she proposes to us here one of her last series, but presented in a new environment: that of primitive arts.

This confrontation is done around a logic which answers, just like did it Gustav Holst in music, with planetary and mythological topics: the Moon, Mars, Mercury, Come, Saturn and the Sun which are associated with their respective terrestrial influences: hunting, the war, money, love, the festival, life. African mythology is of another nature but it also has its powers which it will be necessary to tame. That led to an astonishing variety of means of intercession whose statues and masks are most known.

The title of the exposure, SEVEN SPHERES OF POWER, is not only one wink in direction of the 7 days of cultural activity of the 7th district of this beginning of autumn in which the event fits. Each one knows that each day of the week is marked by a planet and Sunday is the day of the sun. These references to names of gods of a Mythology which is not really anymore ours hide secret influences in which much believes firmly. The planets still keep their powers even if one does not sacrifice anymore to their gods and goddesses.

The spheres of
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Sarah Lagrevol
Ecole du Louvre
Spécialité Arts de l'Afrique

INTRODUCTION
    
    L'Ethiopie, vaste pays mentionné dès le Ier siècle dans le récit grec Le périple de la Mer Erythrée, suscite un engouement particulier de la part des Européens.  Cette Ethiopie rêvée continue au Moyen Age avec le mythe du royaume du Prêtre jean.  
Depuis la conversion du pays au IVe siècle de notre ère, le monde chrétien est omniprésent et accompagne les fidèles dans leur vie quotidienne. Le symbole de la croix, marque distinctive des dévots et image de rédemption, est présent sur tous types de supports (peinture, sculpture, décor architectural, objet façonné…) et de nombreuses interprétations lui sont attachées. Ces croix participent aussi par la bénédiction et les pratiques d'exorcisme à protéger les fidèles et à les soigner spirituellement. Les différents types de médecines pratiquées donnent également lieu à la production de rouleaux aux vertus " magiques " qui chassent ou apaisent les esprits habitant le patient.

    De par l'étude de la
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African traditional masks

There are an enormous variety of masks used in Africa. In West Africa, masks are used in masquerades that form part of religious ceremonies enacted to contact with spirits and ancestors.

The Yoruba, Igbo and Edo cultures, including Egungun Masquerades and Northern Edo Masquerades. The masks are usually carved with an extraordinary skill and variety by artists who will usually have received their training as an apprentice to a master carver - frequently it is a tradition that has been passed down within a family through many generations. Such an artist holds a respected position in tribal society because of the work that he/she creates, embodying not only complex craft techniques but also spiritual/social and symbolic knowledge. African masks are also used in the Mas or Masquerade of the Caribbean Carnival.

African masks are made from different materials: wood, bronze, brass, copper, ivory, terra cotta and glazed pottery, raffia and textiles. Some African masks are colourful. Many African masks represent animals. Some African tribes believe that the animal masks can help them communicate with the spirits who live in forests or open savannas. People of Burkina Faso known as the Bwa and Nuna call to the spirit to stop destruction. The Dogon of Mali have complex religions that also have animal masks. Their beliefs are in three main cults - the Awa, cult of the dead, Bini, cult of communication with spirits and Lebe, cult of earth and nature. These three main cults nevertheless use seventy-eight different types of masks. Most of the ceremonies of the Dogon culture are secret, although the antelope dance is shown to non-Dogons. The antelope masks are rough rectangular boxes with several horns coming out of the top. The Dogons are expert agriculturists and the antelope symbolizes a hard working farmer.

Another culture that has a very rich agricultural tradition is the
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Black African Literature
Modern literature of Black Africa lies at the confluence of various trends: its
own traditions and diverse, the impact of Islamic and Arab worlds;
the pervasive influence of European colonialism and Christianity. Africans
have been particularly prolific since the Second World War;
using French, English, Portuguese and more than forty African languages, they
made up of poetry, fiction, drama, and invented forms of writing
for which there is no description in the European literary world. Their
works portray the modern political and social reality, and focus on
value systems, whether or not African. At the same time, their writings
are based on indigenous traditions and world views typically
Africa.
Long before Europeans arrived, even before the development of writing,
peoples of sub-Saharan Africa have expressed their thoughts in an artistic manner,
their feelings and concerns the deepest in the form of myths,
legends, allegories, parables and stories, songs and chants from
poems, proverbs, riddles and theater. Some traditional forms of
oral literature have survived until today, while new forms do
cease to

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Africa since 1935

Research Director
Professor A. A. Mazrui (Kenya)

Co-Director
C. Wondji (Ivory Coast)

Arts and society since 1935
J. VANSINA

Across Africa today the arts give the show an amazing cauldron of creativity emerged with a dizzying diversity of all layers of society. Many new artistic trends date from the second half of the colonial period. Besides, some pioneers are still working today. After all, it is past two generations since 1935. But in that short time, the artistic activity was a richness and diversity as this chapter may at most trace the main lines of its evolution (1).

Initially, we must enumerate a few general features of social and cultural matrix that is all. These are: the growing impact but unevenly distributed in Europe, the growth of cities, social stratification more trenches that lead to the formation of new classes, the industrial division of time has reached the beaches of leisure may be devoted to the practice and enjoyment of the arts, the prestige associated with the technical and technical training, changing the place and role of the artist in society, past status of artisan to that of cultural soothsayer The change in attitude toward art and their use, alteration of values in general and more specifically the changing religious values. The multiplication of objects of artistic production offers new opportunities, these are just

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Africa under colonial rule, 1880-1935

Research Director
Professor A. A. Boahen (Ghana)

In February 1976, in Nigeria, a man was arrested at a police checkpoint between Ibadan and Lagos. He was carrying two bags full of bronze sculptures and wood on suspicion of having stolen it affirmât well as the owner. Upon inquiry, the man telling the truth. Recently converted to Islam, he lived and worked in Ibadan at a community center. The effigies of deities carved Yoruba he was carrying had been brought in Ibadan, like many others, by migrant workers to satisfy the spiritual aspirations of these artisans, shopkeepers, civil servants and other migrant workers in their temporary residence. But the leader of the community, having converted to Islam, began in turn to convert their neighbors. Converted in his turn, the suspect heard himself served as symbols of their ancient faith were to disappear to allow the community center to become a dwelling worthy of the spiritual presence of Allah. Unable to consider destroying these objects, he resolved to return to his village, place of origin, where they have since been resettled.

This incident is a perfect example of the evolution of cultural forms and their concrete manifestation and at the same time, the survival or the renewal of cultural values from specific forms of domination, whether of a religious or more clearly social. What remained true in 1976 was even more common during this period particularly dramatic external domination of Africa, which saw the submission of an entire people, its social

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 In sub-Saharan Africa, sculpture was and still is made and used for particular, practical purposes. In many instances it is used to mark events or stages of life, like fertility, birth, transition, death. For example, among the Yoruba in Nigeria, Ibeji twin-figurines (from ibi=first born and eji=two) are produced at the birth of someone's twins (a common occurance in this ethnic group). Among the Ashante in Ghana fertility figurines are carved, the Akuaba doll (akua=born on Wednesday and ba=child), to be worn by a young female in order to ensure her fertility. Ikenga figures embody protective spirits for worldly success and to protect the house-hold. Ancestor figures remind the people of those gone. Other carvings are used for initiation and coming-of-age rituals, for harvest festivals and celebrations, for funeral occasions.

 As sculptures in African society always had a practical purpose, they were made for particular occasions only, i.e. on commission from a patron. The client and the artisan would discuss the purpose of the work and agree a price before the sculptor set to work. The client would then rely on the artist to produce a familiar form in a familiar style. For him only the object would be important, not the carver. As most sculptures in Africa have a limited life span due to the climate (humidity, dampness, heat) and insect attack (woodworms, termites), carvings had to be replaced frequently. Nevertheless, "the artist is not a passive copyist, even though one of his major responsibilities is to replace destroyed works" (from African Art in the Cycle of Life, by Roy Sieber & Roslyn Adele Walker, 1987:20). In fact, in this way he represented his generation's link with the past. In other words, "each sculpture had its particular reason for
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The Museum Dapper is a private Parisian museum created in 1986 which defines itself as a «space of arts and of cultures for Africa, the Caribbean and their diasporas».

His name pays tribute to a Dutch humanist of the XVIIth century, Olfert Dapper.
 
History

Olfert Dapper foundation is born in Amsterdam in 1983, in initiative of polytechnicien Michel Leveau, industrialist, to recommend Africain governments [2] and soon possessor of «one of the most abundant collections of African art in Europe».

Asserting his will to help in knowledge and in preservation of the heritages of sub-Saharan Africa, foundation allocates grants of studies and of research in the domains of history and of ethnology, as well as help to publications. A non-profitmaking organisation is created in 1984 by the president and his wife. Christiane Falgayrettes-Leveau, native to Guyana and alumna of Maryse Cop, is then journalist specialised in the literature of the black world.

In May, 1986 she takes the direction of the museum which becomes established first in a private residence of the avenue Victor-Hugo, constructs by Charles Plumet in 1901, a modest space (500 m ²) which they achieve by a small court planted of bamboos and brackens.

Three
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Image 12 elephants masks

Whoever works on the timber can not remove and it should not be mistaken because the return is prohibited. We must therefore bear in mind exactly what you want to achieve and work on a large piece is even more risky that the goal is complex and difficult to reach final equilibrium. Bring forth a form of matter that is not an accurate representation but still recognizable to blow is a recognized quality artists. Zoomorphic masks African accentuate the characters without falling into caricature. The great elephant mask from Cameroon have much larger ears, their trunks very long but they are realistic. The open mouth on the teeth, we imagine a loud cry. And the general attitude expresses the power and might. Considered a royal animal, a privilege of a few lineages, the elephant masks, carried horizontally, appear only rarely in the masquerades and they go last on the dance venues.

Bamileke elephant masks and hoods are beaded to the more abstract. They are recognizable by their large ears flat and we must consider that the long anterior descending to the feet is a mistake but there is no representation of defense and the face is very human characters. They are cons beautifully decorated with beads arranged in geometric patterns. These are worn by members of the society of the elephant under the command of the king, the fon.

In contrast to the achievements of Cameroon zoomorphic masks Izzi elephants are complex compositions and particularly fantastic or only careful study can discern the features of the animal. Trompe shortened

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african art / art africain / primitive art / art primitif / arts premiers / art gallery / art tribal / tribal art / l'oeil et la main / galerie d'art premier / Agalom / Armand Auxiètre / www.african-paris.com / www.agalom.com

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David Norden
http://users.telenet.be/african-shop/kerchache.htm

In a crucial moment for the world of Tribal Arts, Ana &Antonio Casanovas from Arte y Ritual and Alain Bovis Gallery present two consecutive exhibitions in Paris with a selection of masterworks from the Kerchache collection:

1.”HOMMAGE” June 16-July 22 2006
2. “NIGERIA” September 13th –October 20th 2006

“HOMAGE TO JACQUES KERCHACHE”

WHY?

The Quai Branly

We want to pay an HOMAGE to Jacques Kerchache and , in his name, give support to an important historical event : the opening of the Quai Branly,one of the most important museums in the world dedicated entirely to “les Arts Premiers”. Jacques was first appointed to asses the selection of art works for the “Pavillion des Sessions” in the Louvre Museum which was conceived as an antennae of the Quai Branly.He had a crucial role in the creation of this innovative museum and was an important member of the Acquisition Committee.

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african art / art africain / primitive art / art primitif / arts premiers / art gallery / art tribal / tribal art / Afrique / Africa / l'oeil et la main / galerie d'art premier / achat / vente / expertise / expert / exposition / exhibition / collection / collectionneur / Paris / oeuvre / Verneuil / antiquités / antiquaire / musée / museum / masque / mask / statue / sculpture / Agalom / Armand Auxiètre / www.african-paris.com / www.agalom.com

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P R E F A C E


In one of the chaos of rocks the most amazing of Africa, has a population of farmer-warriors who was one of the last of the French domain to lose its independence.


For most whites in West Africa, the Dogon are dangerous men, if not the most backward of the Federation. Ilspassent to practice human sacrifice and even to defend themselves better against all the outside influences that they live a difficult country. Some writers have told their small fears when supposedly daring excursions. From these legends and the pretext of revolts often due to misunderstandings, it has sometimes taken in exile of entire villages.


In short, the Dogon represent one of the finest examples of primitive savage and this opinion is shared by some black Muslims who, intellectually, are not better equipped than whites to appreciate those of their fellow faithful to ancestral traditions. Only officials who have assumed the heavy task of administering these men have learned to love them.


The author of this book and its many teammates attend the Dogon past fifteen years. They published the work of these men who are now the people's best-known French Sudan: The Souls of the Dogon (G. Dieterlen, 1941), The Currency (S. OF GANAY 1941), Masks (M. Griaule, 1938) have brought to scholarly evidence that blacks lived on complex ideas, but ordered, on systems of institutions and rituals where nothing is left to chance or whim. This work, already ten years ago, drew

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Anne-Louise Amanieu
Ecole du Louvre
Specialty Arts of Africa
December 2007

Fang mask society Ngil, Gabon, Pavilion des Sessions at the Louvre

IDENTIFICATION

Fang mask the Pavillon des Sessions consists partly of wood covered with kaolin and measure about 70 cm high. It dates from the late nineteenth century or early twentieth. Listed under the inventory number 65-104-1, it comes from the former collection of André Lefèvre and was acquired in 1965 by the Museum of Man.

DESCRIPTION

This great helmet mask represents a stylized human face, whose face and elongated heart-shaped and slightly concave is shared by a long thin nose. On the top of the forehead develops a studded headband for attaching ornaments and who bears a ridge with extension to the front leads by three strokes for joining the nasal bridge and deployed above the eyebrows. The C-shaped ears stand out in high relief on both sides of the face, as the eyes and mouth, they are barely mentioned by simple incisions highlighted by thin slits etched tattoos that recall that arborist and the Fang Ntoumou Mvai by Günter Tessmann.

ANALYSIS

The mask of Ngil (NGI) exists only among the Fang, the people established the Sanaga River (southern Cameroon) Ogooué River (northern Gabon) and in Equatorial Guinea after a period of migration to the eighteenth and

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Image 7 spheres of power

african art / art africain / primitive art / art primitif / arts premiers / art gallery / art tribal / tribal art / Afrique / Africa / l'oeil et la main / galerie d'art premier / achat / vente / expertise / expert / exposition / exhibition / collection / collectionneur / Paris / oeuvre / Verneuil / antiquités / antiquaire / musée / museum / masque / mask / statue / sculpture / Agalom / Armand Auxiètre / www.african-paris.com / www.agalom.com

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In 1950s, it was possible to find many objects at the price of 10 francs on the flea markets of Europe. The first objects to take value were those of the Benin because they were bronze, then came the fashion of objects to black patina of Ivory Coast, and those of Bakota of the Gabon plated by copper and by brass. The big statues were worth more expensive than the babies, while most often in Africa, if they are small it is to be able to hide them more easily because they have a particular importance.

  

In 1983, a Parisian trader, Jean-Michel Huguenin, makes discover seats Sénoufo. In 1985, another Parisian trader, Réginald Groux, discovers the ladders of lofts Dogon — coming from the cliff of Bandiagara — and Lobi in the region of Mopti (Mali).He acquires a first lot of fifty, makes them socler and sells them in his gallery by making a pretty benefit.

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