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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'costume'

Kifwebe mask, Songe people, Democratic Republic of Congo
Kifwebe mask, Songe people, Democratic Republic of Congo
€ 32,000.00
Kifwebe mask, Songye people, Democratic Republic of Congo
Kifwebe mask, Songye people, Democratic Republic of Congo
€ 8,500.00
Female Kifwebe mask, Songye, Democratic Republic of Congo
Female Kifwebe mask, Songye, Democratic Republic of Congo
€ 12,000.00

STRENGTH AND MEASUREMENT

The discovery of "primitive art": an art of strength
Shapes and shape functions
Deities and ancestors
The living wood

Force and Measurement

Develop an aesthetic of black Africa is seen as a risky business in many ways. Is it legitimate to isolate these objects, that today we call art, the general framework of their relations and their cultural constraints? Can we submit to a test that has never existed in the minds of their creators? And can we finally see in this art - if we 'take on this term - a uniform phenomenon, despite the wide variety of both regional and local styles we offer this huge continent, following lengthy Historical developments often poorly understood? Finally, remember that this approach excludes large regions, including Africa white, that is to say the Mediterranean area with its ancient history, the eastern and southern Africa whose pastoral peoples have given rise to cultures almost without images, and finally these hunting societies, which, even in our time have not passed the stage of evolution of prehistoric rock paintings which are the main evidence of an artistic production that appears at various points the continent. Similarly, we must exclude from our contribution to the aesthetics of black African art the old feudal societies, including Benin. Our discussion is therefore limited to large areas farmers, the true cradle of

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AFRICAN SCULPTURE

Introduction
Context of African sculpture
Places of traditional African sculpture
Canons of African sculpture
Techniques and creative
Aesthetic
Role of African sculpture in the middle
Universal impact of African sculpture
Bibliographic


Introduction

Never has been written about as much ink as traditional African sculpture. Ever, despite all attempts, the man has managed to evacuate his mental field, much less its history, that is to say of his encounter with the other. It has been a cornerstone to measure the "civilization" of the black man and his ability to create capacity variously appreciated throughout history until early this century, cubism helping, the unanimously begins to make the exceptional nature of African sculpture that was always confused with African art which it is a party, probably the most important, if one were to judge solely by the number Parts created that we have reached.

Context of African sculpture

We can talk about African sculpture in isolation from the rest of the arts of Africa south of Sahara. Every word in this area is responsible not only meaningless but history, and if we chose the term "African art" is to fully assume all we have inherited from the past in

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Leo Frobenius

Leo Viktor Frobenius (29 juin 1873 à Berlin - 9 août 1938, Biganzolo, Lac Majeur, Piémont, Italie) était un ethnologue et archéologue allemand, essentiel dans l'ethnographie germanique.

Biographie

Leo Frobenius entreprend en 1904 sa première expédition en Afrique, dans le Kasaï congolais, et formule à cette occasion sa théorie de l'Atlantis africaine. Jusqu'en 1918, il voyage, dans l'Afrique du nord et du nord-est, en particulier le Soudan central et occidental. En 1920, il fonde l'Institut pour la morphologie culturelle à Munich. Il devient professeur honoraire de l'Université de Francfort en 1932, et directeur du musée ethnographique de la ville en 1935.

Frobenius est l'un des premiers ethnologues à remettre en cause les bases idéologiques du colonialisme, en contestant notamment l'idée que les Européens auraient trouvé en Afrique des peuples véritablement sauvages, auxquels ils auraient apporté la civilisation :

    « Lorsqu’ils arrivèrent dans la baie de Guinée et abordèrent à Vaïda, les capitaines furent fort étonnés de trouver des rues bien aménagées, bordées sur une longueur de plusieurs lieues par deux rangées d’arbres ; ils traversèrent pendant de
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Juan Gris

José Victoriano Carmelo Carlos González-Pérez, connu sous le nom de Juan Gris, né le 23 mars 1887 à Madrid et mort le 11 mai 1927 à Boulogne-Billancourt, était un peintre espagnol qui vécut et travailla en France presque toute sa vie. Ses œuvres sont connectées de près avec l'émergence d'un style artistique innovatif : le Cubisme.

Biographie

Juan Gris suivit des études de dessin industriel à la Escuela de Artes y Manufacturas à Madrid entre 1902 et 1904, période pendant laquelle il contribua par des dessins à des journaux locaux. En 1904 et 1905, il étudia la peinture avec l'artiste académique José Maria Carbonero.

En 1906 il s'installa à Paris où il deviendra l'ami d'Henri Matisse, Georges Braque, Fernand Léger, et en 1915 il fut peint par son ami Amedeo Modigliani. Il y retrouva et se lia d'amitié avec son compatriote Pablo Picasso. Son portrait de Picasso de 1912 est l'une des premières peintures cubistes réalisées par un autre peintre que Pablo Picasso ou Georges Braque.

Bien qu'il soumît des illustrations humoristiques à des journaux comme L'assiette au beurre , Le Charivari, et Le Cri de Paris, Gris commença à peindre sérieusement en 1910. Dès 1912, il avait
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Mythology

The term "mythology" sometimes refers to the study of myths and sometimes refers to a body of myths. For example, comparative mythology is the study of connections between myths from different cultures, whereas Greek mythology is the body of myths from ancient Greece. The term "myth" is often used colloquially to refer to a false story;[4][5] however, the academic use of the term generally does not refer to truth or falsity.In the field of folkloristics, a myth is conventionally defined as a sacred narrative explaining how the world and humankind came to be in their present form.Many scholars in other academic fields use the term "myth" in somewhat different ways. In a very broad sense, the term can refer to any traditional story.

Nature of myths

Typical characteristics

The main characters in myths are usually gods or supernatural heroes. As sacred stories, myths are often endorsed by rulers and priests and closely linked to religion. In the society in which it is told, a myth is usually regarded as a true account of the remote past.[14][17][18][15] In fact, many societies have two categories of traditional narrative—(1) "true stories", or myths, and (2) "false stories", or fables.Myths generally take place in a primordial age, when the world had not yet achieved its current form.[14] They explain how the world gained its current form and how customs, institutions, and taboos were established.

Related
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“Africa Remix” featured the work of over 100 African artists in a 2,200-sq.m exhibition space. With paintings by Chéri Samba, installations by Barthélémy Toguo, drawings by Frédéric Bruly Bouabré and photographs by Guy Tillim, “Africa Remix” revealed the varied facets of Africa’s contemporary arts scene.

The exhibition examined contemporary African art not only from an aesthetic angle but also from historical, political and ideological perspectives.

- Total pledges support for African art with the ”Africa Remix” exhibition in Paris -

So near, and yet so far: Africa is an enigma that continues to exert a strange fascination for many. “Africa Remix” was an invitation to reflect on what Africa really means – to explore and rediscover it by straying from the beaten path of commonplace ideas and platitudes. As Total has a strong presence in Africa, we are all too aware of the difficulties affecting the continent, but we’re also committed to bringing African culture the recognition it deserves.

Africa Remix

Under the artistic direction of Simon Njami (photo), an international team of curators (see dates and facts as well as the photo) has assembled this overview of the artistic production in Africa and the African diaspora. 88 artists show works from the last 10 years, among them several specially
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African art

African art constitutes one of the most diverse legacies on earth. Though many casual observers tend to generalize "traditional" African art, the continent is full of peoples, societies, and civilizations, each with a unique visual special culture. The definition also includes the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.

    * Emphasis on the human figure: The human figure has always been a the primary subject matter for most African art, and this emphasis even influenced certain European traditions. For example in the fifteenth century Portugal traded with the Sapi culture near the Ivory Coast in West Africa, who created elaborate ivory saltcellars that were hybrids of African and European designs, most notably in the addition of the human figure (the human figure typically did not appear in Portuguese saltcellars). The human figure may symbolize the living or the dead, may reference chiefs, dancers, or various trades such as drummers or hunters, or even may be an anthropomorphic representation of a god or have other votive function. Another common theme is the inter-morphosis of human and animal.

Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. 12th century A.D.

    * Visual abstraction: African artworks tend to favor visual abstraction over naturalistic representation. This is because many African artworks generalize stylistic norms. Ancient Egyptian art, also usually thought of as naturalistically depictive, makes use of highly abstracted and regimented visual canons, especially in painting, as well as the use of different colors to represent the qualities and characteristics of an individual being depicted.

    * Emphasis on sculpture: African artists
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Masks

The viewing of masks is often restricted to certain peoples or places, even when used in performance, or masquerade. African masks manifest spirits of ancestors or nature as well as characters that are spiritual and social forces. During a masquerade, which is performed during ceremonial occasions such as agricultural, initiation, leadership and funerary rites, the mask becomes the otherworld being. When collected by Western cultures, masks are often displayed without their costume ensemble and lack the words, music and movement, or dance, that are integral to the context of African masquerades. Visually, masks are often a combination of human and animal traits. They can be made of wood, natural or man-made fibers, cloth and animal skin. Masks are usually worn with costumes and can, to some extent, be categorized by form, which includes face masks, crest masks, cap masks, helmet masks, shoulder masks, and fiber and body masks. Maskettes, which are shaped like masks, are smaller and are not worn on or over the face. They may be worn on an individual’s arm or hip or hung on a fence or other structure near the performance area.

Sculpture

The cultures of Africa have created a world-renowned tradition of three-dimensional and relief sculpture. Everyday and ceremonial works of great delicacy and surface detail are fashioned by artists using carving, modeling, smithing and casting techniques. Masks, figures, musical instruments, containers, furniture, tools and equipment are all part of the sculptor’s repertoire. The human figure is perhaps the most prominent sculptural form in Africa, as it has been for millennia. Male and female images in wood, ivory, bone, stone, earth, fired clay, iron and copper alloy embody cultural values, depict the ideal and represent spirits, ancestors and deities. Used in a broad range of contexts--initiation, healing, divination,
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At a glance the Other


History of European eyes on Africa, America and Oceania

At a glance, and one devoted to successive visions brought by Europeans on the cultures of Africa, the Americas and Oceania. This program is a pretext to put into perspective by thematic series, the relativity of our eyes on the threshold of a new museum. Rather than return to the past, this catalog (and exhibition which is the source) marks a starting point.

From the Renaissance to today, the "idols of the Indians", "instruments of the natives," "primitive fetishes," "Negro Sculpture" or "first arts" were the witnesses of likes and dislikes, revealing reflections on otherness. The originality of this publication reflects historical depth that allows to include these objects in a broader history of art.

The Musée du Quai Branly appealed not only to works of other cultures, reflecting the first contacts with Europe, but also to European works within the midst of which they were placed. The catalog shows as well, in a strange series of chapters, how European eyes have gradually allowed other creations from, for example, curiosity amazed rankings systematic evolutionary wanderings of the images of the Universal.

Throughout the pages, the reader travels with the Nave of Charles V., Écouen treasure museum, portraits of Indians of Brazil painted in 1637 for the palace of the Prince of Nassau, rhinoceros horn cups Habsburg Pre-Columbian

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De l’africanisme aux études africaines Textes et « humanités » Alain Ricard Tout discours sur l'Afrique, et en particulier l'Afrique noire, ne peut il relever que de la passion, voire de lacompassion ? N’y a t-il que les fous d’Afrique – titre d’un livre récent – pour s’intéresser à elle ? Quelles formes de raison peut-il convoquer ?La première qui se présenta fut géographique. Sorte de page blanche de notre humanité jusqu'au XIXe siècle, l'Afrique a été inscrite avec nos routes, nos cartes, nos frontières ; aujourd'hui, les images satellitaires ne nous en laisentrien ignorer. Nous savons au mètre près ce qui se passe à Kisangani en guerre, là où Stanley donna à des chutes son nom : il avait compris que cette courbe du fleuve Congo était le centre du continent, il pensait en géographe et en stratège... Cette Afrique des images reste face à nous, extérieure : ne relève-t-elle pas aussi d'autres formes de raison plus intérieures, voire existentielles ? Quel immense murmure monte de la forêt ? Que dit-il ? Ces Africains ne sont-ils qued'empruntés francophones ou de pompeux anglophones ? Des bégayeurs maladroits ou des volubiles irresponsables ?L'inscription géographique, qui en reste à l'image, est trop facilement la proie de la marchandise. Aujourd'hui il nous faut le son, le discours. Des langues en expansion composent d'autres circulations que nous ne capterons pas avec nos satellites. Il nous faut passer de l'œil à l'oreille, du regard à l'écoute... Les blancs des cartes Les sciences humaines redécouvrent l’afrique, titrait un journal du soir après un colloque tenu à Nantes – « Les sciences de l’homme

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Jean Rouch

Jean Rouch (Paris - 31 May 1917, Niger - 18 February 2004) was a French filmmaker and anthropologist.

He is considered to be one of the founders of the cinéma vérité in France, sharing the aesthetics of the direct cinema in the US pionered by Richard Leacock,D.A. Pennebaker and Albert and David Maysles. Rouch's practice as a filmmaker for over sixty years in Africa, was characterized by the idea of shared anthropology. Influenced by his discovery of surealism in his early twenties, many of his films blur the line between fiction and documentary, creating a new style of ethnofiction. He was also hailed by the French New Wave as one of theirs. His seminal film Me a Black (Moi un Noir) pionered the technique of jump cut popularized by Jean-Luc Godard. Godard said of Rouch in the Cahiers du Cinéma (Notebooks on Cinema) n°94 April 1959 "In charge of research for the Musée de l'Homme (French, "Museum of Man") Is there a better definition for a filmmaker?". Along his career, Rouch was no stranger to controversy. He would often repeat "Glory to he who brings dispute".

Biography

He began his long association with African subjects in 1941 after working as civil engineer supervising a construction project in Niger. However, shortly afterwards he returned to France to participate in the Resistance. After the war, he did a brief stint as a journalist with Agence France-Presse before returning to Africa where he become an influential anthropologist and sometimes controversial
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Germaine Dieterlen, née à Valleraugue (Gard) en 1903 et morte à Paris le 13 novembre 1999, est une ethnologue française.

Ancienne élève de Marcel Mauss, elle a travaillé au sein des ethnies Dogon et Bambara avec, entre autres, Marcel Griaule, Jean Rouch, Solange de Ganay et Denise Paulme.
Elle débuta ses recherches au Mali en 1937 où elle poursuivit les travaux entamés par le répérage de la mission Dakar-Djibouti (voir Dakar et Djibouti) de Griaule et consorts.
Elle a été Directeur d'Etudes à l'École pratique des hautes études EPHE (Sorbonne) avec charge d'enseignement.

De 1956 à 1975 elle succède à Marcel Griaule comme secrétaire générale de la Société des africanistes.
En 1962 elle fait partie de l'équipe du CNRS RCP n°11 Objet et méthodes d'une ethnosociologie comparée de l'Afrique noire.
Fin 1968, la RCP 11 évolue, sous la direction de Germaine Dieterlen, pour devenir le Groupe de Recherche 11, sous le nom de Étude des phénomènes religieux en Afrique occidentale et équatoriale.

En octobre 1971 elle préside le colloque La notion de personne en Afrique noire dont les actes du même nom

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Masques du Gabon

Les masques traditionnels ont toujours tenu une place importante au sein des cultures gabonaises. Chaque ethnie a les siens, dédiés à des cérémonies variées mais toutes importantes dans le rythme de vie de ces populations.

Masque Okuyi

Les masques Okuyi sont utilisés dans la tribu Myénée. Ils sont utilisés pour accompagner les funérailles ou les retraits de deuil.

Symbolique et utilisation

Ce sont des masques d'ancêtres. Ils expriment la sérénité de leurs anciens qui les protègent et les conseillent depuis le royaume des morts. Le porteur du masque est recouvert d'un costume de raphia. Durant les cérémonies, il pousse des cris sauvages destinés à effrayer les spectateurs.

Les masques noirs sont quant à eux probablement dotés d'une fonction judiciaire.

Caractéristiques

Masque anthropomorphe blanc, sa face est peinte au kaolin. La couleur blanche du kaolin est
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African traditional religion

African traditional religions, also referred to as African indigenous religions or African tribal religions, is a term referring to a variety of religions indigenous to the continent of Africa. Like tribal religions from other parts of the world, African religious traditions are defined largely along community lines.

Traditional African religions involve teachings, practices, and rituals that lend structure to indigenous African societies. These traditional African religions also play a large part in the cultural understanding and awareness of the people of their communities.


African Traditional Religion and Language

Most traditional African religions have, for most of their existence, been orally/spiritually (rather than scripturally) transmitted. Thus, linguistic experts such as Christopher Ehret and Placide Tempels have applied their knowledge of languages towards reconstructing the original core beliefs of the followers of these traditions. The four linguistic phylums spoken in Africa are: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Congo, and Khoi-San.

Afro-Asiatic Spirituality

According to linguist Christopher Ehret, traditional religion among Afro-Asiatic-speaking (Afrasan) peoples was originally henotheistic in nature. In this sense, each clan gave
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Tombouctou

Tombouctou (Timbuktu ou Tin-Buktu en tamasheq) est une ville située sur le fleuve Niger au Mali. Elle est surnommée « la ville aux 333 saints » et « la perle du désert ».

Tombouctou est aussi le nom d'une des huit régions qui composent le Mali et le gouverneur de cette région siège dans la ville du même nom.

Étymologie

Le nom « Tombouctou » viendrait du tamasheq, langue des Touareg qui auraient fondé la ville au XIIe siècle, de Tin (ou Tim), qui signifie « puits» ou « lieu », et de Bouctou, nom donné à la femme présente à l'arrivée des Touareg, gardienne d'un puits, et qui désignerait une personne originaire d’Essouk – ce qui donne « le lieu de Bouctou ». À cette étymologie proposée par Abderrahamne es-Saâdi au XVIIe siècle dans son Tarikh es-Sudan (Histoire du Soudan), l’explorateur allemand Heinrich Barth au XIXe siècle, lui, donne une origine songhaï du mot Tombouctou qui désignerait une « dépression entre les dunes ».

Histoire

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FORCE ET MESURE

Elaborer une esthétique de l'Afrique noire apparaît comme une entreprise hasardeuse à bien des égards. Est-il légitime d'isoler ces objets, qu'aujourd'hui nous qualifions d'œuvres d'art, du cadre général de leurs relations et de leurs contraintes culturelles ? Peut-on les soumettre à un critère qui n'a jamais existé dans la pensée de leurs créateurs ? Et peut-on, enfin, voir dans cet art - si l'on s' en tient à ce terme - un phénomène uniforme, malgré la grande variété de styles tant régionaux que locaux que nous offre cet énorme continent, à la suite de longues évolutions historiques souvent mal connues ? Enfin, n'oublions pas que cette approche exclut de vastes régions, notamment l' Afrique blanche, c' est à dire la zone méditerranéenne avec son histoire millénaire ; l'Afrique orientale et méridionale dont les peuples de pasteurs ont donné naissance à des cultures pratiquement sans images ; et enfin ces sociétés de chasseurs, qui, encore à notre époque, n'ont pas dépassé le stade d'évolution de la préhistoire et dont les peintures rupestres constituent le principal témoignage d'une production artistique qui apparaît en divers points du continent. De même, il nous faut exclure de notre contribution à une esthétique de l'art d'Afrique noire les anciennes sociétés féodales, notamment le Bénin. Notre réflexion se borne donc aux vastes régions paysannes, véritable berceau de la sculpture sur bois.

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André Malraux

André Malraux (3 November 1901 – 23 November 1976) was a French author, adventurer and statesman, and a dominant figure in French politics and culture.

Biography

Malraux was born in Paris in 1901. His parents separated in 1905 and eventually divorced. He was raised by his mother and maternal grandmother, Berthe and Adrienne Lamy. His father, a stockbroker, committed suicide in 1930. Andre had Tourette's Syndrome during his childhood, resulting in motor and vocal tics. This may have contributed to his animated and memorable oratory style later in life.

At the age of 21, Malraux left for Cambodia with his new wife Clara Goldschmidt. In Cambodia, he undertook an exploratory expedition into the Cambodian jungle. On his return he was arrested by French colonial authorities for removing bas-reliefs from one of the temples he discovered. Banteay Srei. The French government itself had removed large numbers of sculptures and artifacts from already discovered sites such as Angkor Wat around this time. Malraux later incorporated the episode into his second novel La Voie Royale.

Malraux became highly critical of the French colonial authorities in Indochina, and in 1925 helped to organize the Young Annam League and founded a newspaper Indochina in Chains.

On his return to France, he published
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Henri Matisse

Photo of Henri Matisse by Carl Van Vechten, 1933.
Birth name     Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse
Born     31 December 1869 (1869-12-31)
Le Cateau-Cambrésis, Nord-Pas-de-Calais
Died     3 November 1954 (1954-11-04) (aged 84)
Nice, France
Nationality     French
Field     painting, printmaking, sculpture, drawing, collage
Training     Académie Julian, William-Adolphe Bouguereau, Gustave Moreau
Movement     Fauvism, Modernism
Works     Woman with a Hat (Madame Matisse), 1905

in museums:

    * Museum of Modern Art

Patrons     Gertrude Stein, Etta Cone, Claribel Cone, Michael and Sarah Stein, Albert C.
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Image Tristan Tzara
Tristan Tzara

Born     April 4 or April 16, 1896
Moineşti, Kingdom of Romania
Died     December 25, 1963 (aged 67)
Paris, France
Pen name     S. Samyro, Tristan, Tristan Ruia, Tristan Ţara, Tr. Tzara
Occupation     poet, essayist, journalist, playwright, performance artist, composer, film director, politician, diplomat
Nationality     Romanian, French
Writing period     1912–1963

            Guillaume Apollinaire, Henri Barzun, Fernand Divoire, Alfred Jarry, Jules Laforgue, Comte de Lautréamont, Maurice Maeterlinck, Adrian Maniu, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Ion Minulescu, Christian Morgenstern, Francis Picabia, Arthur Rimbaud, Urmuz, François Villon, Walt Whitman

Influenced

            Louis Aragon, Marcel Avramescu, Samuel Beckett, André Breton, William S. Burroughs, Andrei Codrescu, Jacques G.
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Image André Derain and the fauvisme movement
André Derain

Born     10 June 1880(1880-06-10)
Chatou, Yvelines,
Île-de-France
Died     8 September 1954 (aged 74)
Garches, Hauts-de-Seine, Île-de-France

André Derain (10 June 1880 – 8 September 1954) was a French painter and co-founder of Fauvism with Henri Matisse.

Biography

Derain was born in 1880 in Chatou, Yvelines, Île-de-France, just outside Paris. In 1898, while studying to be an engineer at the Académie Camillo, he attended painting classes under Eugène Carrière, and there met Matisse. In 1900, he met and shared a studio with Maurice de Vlaminck and began to paint his first landscapes. His studies were interrupted from 1901 to 1904 when he was conscripted into the French army. Following his release from service, Matisse persuaded Derain's parents to allow him to abandon his engineering career and devote himself solely to painting; subsequently Derain attended the Académie Julian.

Derain and Matisse worked together through the summer of 1905 in the Mediterranean village of Collioure and later that year displayed their highly
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