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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'sculptor'

Kam mask, Babanki style, Cameroon
Kam mask, Babanki style, Cameroon
€ 7,600.00
André Lhote
 
 
 
L'Escale, 1913, Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris.
André Lhote (5 July 1885 – 25 January 1962) was a French sculptor and painter of figure subjects, portraits, landscapes and still life. He was also very active and influential as a teacher and writer on art.
 
 
Lhote was born in Bordeaux and learnt wood carving and sculpture from the age of 12, when his father apprenticed him to a local furniture maker to be trained as a sculptor in wood. He enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux in 1898 and studied decorative sculpture until 1904. Whilst there, he began to paint in his spare time and he left home in 1905, moving into his own studio to devote himself to painting. He was influenced by Gauguin and Cézanne and held his first one-man exhibition at the Galerie Druet in 1910, four years after he had moved to Paris.
After initially working in a Fauvist style, Lhote shifted towards Cubism and joined the Section d'Or group in 1912, exhibiting at the Salon de la Section d'Or. He was alongside some of the fathers of modern art, including Gleizes, Villon, Duchamp, Metzinger, Picabia and La Fresnaye.
The outbreak of the First World War interrupted his work and, after discharge from the army in 1917, he became one of the group of Cubists supported by Léonce Rosenberg. In 1918, he co-founded Nouvelle Revue Française, the art journal to which he contributed articles on art theory until 1940. Lhote taught at the Académie Notre-Dame des Champs from 1918 to 1920 and later taught at other Paris art schools—including his own school, which he founded in Montparnasse in
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The Authenticity of African Sculptures

by Henri Kamer

The issue of authenticity of African art has been central to collectors for decades.  Henri Kamer, who was president of the International Arts Experts Association at the time, published an outstanding account of the state of the matter in Artes d'Afrique Noire, No. 12 (1974).  The text  that follows is extracted from an English translation of that article, and has been edited further.  The original includes a number of illustrations.  They are not included here because I believe the text suffices without them. 

The original version, including the illustrations, in French and with the English translation, is 

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African Art on the Internet
 
 
 
15th Triennial Symposium on African Art, Arts Council of the African Studies Association, 2011, Wednesday, March 23 - Saturday, March 26, 2011, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
http://www.acasaonline.org/conf_next.htm
Addis Art - Ethiopian Art and Artists Page
Contemporary Ethiopian art and artists - paintings, sculptures and digital art work by students and professionals from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University instructor, Getahun Assefa's paintings, drawings, sculpture, digital art. Also work by his brother, Tesfaye Assefa. Based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. [KF] http://www.addisart.com/
Addis Art - Nouveau Art from Ethiopia
Artists include Shiferaw Girma and Lulseged Retta. Photographs of each artist's work, a biography, and video. Founded by Mesai Haileleul. [KF] http://www.addis-art.com/
Adire African Textiles - Duncan Clarke
History, background, and photographs of adire, adinkra, kente, bogolan, Yoruba aso-oke, akwete, ewe, kuba, and nupe textiles. The symbolism of images is often provided. One can purchase textiles as well. Clarke's Ph.D. dissertation (School of Oriental and African Studies) is on Yoruba men's weaving. See also the Adire African Textiles blog. Based in London. http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/
Afewerk Tekle
"Ethiopia’s leading artist." Biography, his paintings, sculptures, mosaics, murals, art in the artist's home. Afewerk created the stained-glass windows at the entrance of Africa Hall, headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. "In 1964, he became the first winner of the Haile Selassie I prize for Fine Arts." "In 2000, he was one of the few chosen World Laureates by the council of the ABI on the occasion of the 27th
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Image BABUNGO: Treasures Of The Sculptor Kings In Cameroon
NOTUE' Jean-Paul et TRIACA Bianca
 
BABUNGO: Treasures Of The Sculptor Kings In Cameroon
 
Détails sur le produit:
Broché: 224 pages - 48 col. ill., 90 b/w ill., cm 17x24 - Editeur: Five Continents Editions; Édition: illustrated edition (1 janvier 2006) - Langue : Anglais - ISBN-10: 887439201X - ISBN-13: 978-8874392018
 
Descrizione libro: Il libro presenta più di un centinaio di oggetti del patrimonio culturale e artistico di Bandjoun, uno dei principali centri di creazione e tradizione artistica della Grassland camerunense, la cui fama per quanto riguarda l'estetica e l'arte africana è nota. I visitatori di Bandjoun rimangono impressionati dalle danze, le cerimonie e i panorami, gli elementi architettonici riccamente ornati, gli splendidi troni reali, le magnifiche maschere e gli oggetti di perle, le stoffe dagli enigmatici motivi ornamentali e i vari oggetti cultuali che sono spesso espressione del ciclo vitale. Le opere di questi artisti di talento sono, da un lato, la celebrazione dei fasti della corte reale di Bandjoun, della magnificenza e del potere dei suoi monarchi e dei loro collaboratori, e della solidità delle istituzioni, e, dall'altro, la traduzione formale di temi universali come la morte, la vita, la sconfitta, l'amore, la vittoria, il potere, il prestigio, la forza occulta, ecc. In molti casi sono opere di eccelsa qualità esecutiva, di indiscutibile autenticità, e di grande valore storico-sociale. Tra i pezzi esposti sono presenti alcuni dei capolavori dell'arte africana. Qui la creazione artistica fa leva su una creazione vitale e
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Image Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
FARDON Richard and STELZIG Christine
 
Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
 
 
Détails sur le produit:
 
Relié: 160 pages - Editeur: Saffron Books (15 septembre 2005) - Collection: Saffron Afriscopes - Langue: Anglais - ISBN-10: 1872843468 - ISBN-13: 978-1872843469
FARDON Richard and STELZIG Christine: 
Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
Descriptions du produit: Descrizione libro
 
 
 
 
 
Descriptions du produit:
 
 
 
Descrizione libro
 
Saffron Books [EAP London], 2005. Hardcover. 1st Edition. "Column to Volume: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary" investigates the appearance on world art markets during the 1970s of statues identified as Chamba from West Africa. Sought after for their artful execution, these statues were stylistically unlike anything previously documented from the region. Are they what the art market claimed? Who made them, when, where and why?To answer these questions, Richard Fardon and Christine Stelzig had to combine the findings of ethnographic research in Cameroon and Nigeria with museum and archival research and the testimonies of art dealers and collectors. Profusely illustrated, "Column to Volume" offers a comprehensive account of an important sculptural tradition in West Africa, as well as fascinating insights into the tribal branding, distribution, and copying, of African art works during the 1970s.Identifying formal innovation in what has been described as 'tribal' tradition, not least by tracing the individual sculptor irresponsible for
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WHAT IS AFRICAN ART? 

SUPPORT NOTES FOR TEACHER

Learning & Information Department 
Telephone +44 (0)20 7323 8511/8854 
Facsimile +44 (0)20 7323 8855 
education@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk 
Great Russell Street 
London WC1B 3DG 
Switchboard +44 (0)20 7323 8000 
www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk 
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‘African Vision: The Walt Disney-Tishman African Art Collection’
 
This female figure, made of ivory and standing 37 inches tall, was made in the early Nineteenth Century by Edo peoples in the Benin kingdom court style, and was probably intended for an altar to a queen mother. It is one of the first two objects purchased by Paul and Ruth Tishman in 1959. "Ivory can be almost universally interpreted as a symbol of importance and wealth,” says exhibition curator Bryna Freyer.
WASHINGTON D.C.:Most Americans know little about the vast and diverse continent of Africa, much less the arts created there. Dark and primitive, the arts of the African peoples reflect the rituals of life, stripped to the most basic interpretive forms both conceptually and artistically.
Celebrating the arts of Africa and the profound role that they have played in molding Twentieth Century Abstraction and Modernist art in the "West" is the Smithsonian's newest exhibition, "African Vision: The Walt Disney-Tishman African Art Collection." It is on view through September 7, 2008, at The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art (NMAA).
 
"African Vision" showcases 88 outstanding artworks, part of a larger collection donated to the NMAA, that represents the largest gift of sculpture in the museum's history.
 
In 1959, Paul and Ruth Tishman began their collection with the purchase of two pieces of art from the Benin kingdom — an early Nineteenth Century ivory female figure standing 37 inches tall, made in the court style by the Edo peoples, and a 28-inch-tall, Eighteenth Century copper alloy mask that was worn by a divine-healer in masquerade
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Walker Evans

Walker Evans
Il est né le 3 novembre 1903, à Saint-Louis, Missouri. Il étudie au Williams College en 1922-1923 et à la Sorbonne en 1926. Evans débute la photographie en 1930. Il obtient une bourse de la Fondation John-Simon-Guggenheim en 1940, 1941 et 1959. Il entre au magazine Time en 1945 et à Fortune en 1965. Cette même année, il devient professeur de photographie à l'école d'art de l'Université Yale. Il est mort le 10 avril 1975, à New Haven, Connecticut.
On connaît notamment son travail sur la Grande dépression, participant au programme de la Farm Security Administration. Les images de métayers dans l'Alabama, au même titre que celles de Dorothea Lange, comptent parmi les icônes du monde moderne.
On remarque dans son travail les regards des sujets fixant l'objectif de Walker Evans : ici pas de doute le sujet se sait photographié, pour autant il ne se compose pas un visage de circonstance orné d'un sourire obligatoire. Ici la photographie ne se contente pas de montrer, elle interroge le spectateur, l'américain des années 1930 : si le sujet se laisse photographier dans cette posture, c'est que son regard a quelque chose à nous dire. Ce n'est peut-être plus nous qui le regardons mais lui qui nous accuse.
Cette franchise du photographe préserve une dignité humaine mise à mal par la misère qui se laisse voir dans les vêtements en loques.
Cet aspect de ses photos est
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Kongo Nail Fetishes from the Chiloango River Area
By Ezio Bassani
 
Originally published in African Arts - April 1977, Volume X, Number 3
In the nineteenth century, ethnologists who collected and catalogued objects of art from Africa were not concerned with 
discovering the names of the artists or even their ethnic identities; usually, broad indications of geographic origins, such as 
"the Lower Congo," "the region of the White Nile," or the "River Uelle" were deemed sufficient identification. In addition, 
because these objects were regarded merely as documents of a mode of life inferior to that of Western societies, no effort 
was made to categorize them stylistically. Although during the first ten years of this century, French and German artists 
revealed the artistic independence and importance of African sculpture, scholars persisted in considering the works of 
African carvers as popular,
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The Yoruba


The term Yoruba describes both a language and a tribe living between Nigeria and the Republic of Benin, in an area covered by forests and savannah. Their history can be traced from the beginning of our millennium, with the civilization of Ife. Following the collapse of the kingdom of Ife kingdom of a number such as Oyo and Ijebu emerged, they in turn disintegrated during the 18th and 19th, but were revived by the colonial powers, to the end of the 19th. Today they are still the basis of the Yoruba political structure. The slave trade touched heavily Yoruba people of Nigeria and he contributed to their diaspora and the release of their rites and beliefs.


The Yoruba are prolific craftsmen, most Yoruba art objects dating from between the late 19 th and the middle of this century, and can sometimes be attributed to known artists by their names, which is an exception in African art.


During the XVI, the Ijebu kingdom, ruled areas near the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. copper imported by sailors, was traded by the Portuguese Ijebu and many bronze objects were created by their artists. These objects reflect the influence of their neighbors, the Kingdom of Benin. Nevertheless, their bells and bracelets scepters are usually decorated with figures, half human, half animal with eyes bulging and curved scars on his forehead.

The empire of Oyo between the XVII and XIX was located in the northern territories or peoples

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Image mossi
The Mossi


The first Mossi empire was founded during the fifteenth, by invaders from northern Ghana, today the Mossi are the largest tribe in Burkina Faso. The number of two million, they are the only people in the region to have a centralized government, headed by former Zaksoba.

Mossi sculptors are known for their polychrome masks that are worn during festivals, and to keep the crops. These masks that fulfill a function as totem, are carefully guarded when not worn, and their libations are offered in exchange for their protection and assistance.

Three different types of masks can be identified: they seem to correspond to different indigenous peoples living in this region prior to the invasion Mossi XV. The first type is found mostly in the western part of the Mossi, and includes masks decorated with small statues, animal or stylized face. The second type is included in the semicircular masks painted in white and representing positive spirits associated with the savanna. The third type of Mossi mask, called Karanga, is found mostly in the northern part of the country. It has a stylish rounded face topped by a large plate, a totemic animal or a human statue symbolizing an important ancestor. The statues are
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Image Dogon

DOGON ART

 

 

 

Dominating from the XIVth century the Bandiagra's cliffs, in Malia, DOGON initiated

a very old artistic production. Line and  shape's style is the main criterion to show power

of rites organising their society. Each work is a deep representation of cosmogony structuring

daily life.

 

A single cosmogony

 

As a patriarcal society, all professions have a ritual meaning according to God Amma and

his eight ancestors. DOGON

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Image SENOUFO

AFRICA COLORS

exhibition from September 30 to December 6, 2010

This new exhibition offers a unique ethnic landscape through the theme of color in African art. Masks of War Dan masks Ibibio of Nigeria, Armand Auxiètre,

Gallery director "The eye and hand" presents a selection

representative works of customs or practices of these civilizations:

Pure and simple, the colors are chosen by the artists

to evoke in turn respect for ancestors, virility new initiates, death ... Gallery Eye and the Hand invite you to discover the symbolic

* Mask Anang, Language Arts Ibidio, Nigeria, XX, Wood and pigments.

According Fagg this hairstyle could mimic that of the wives of missionaries. This mask was probably made in the years 20/30 by famous sculptor Akpan Chukwu death in the early 50 or by one of his disciples.

Some features like the nose rounded chin bulging contours clearly defined eyes and lips that speak for attribution. Mask probably the same time and same sculptor is the Musée Barbier Muller.

Opening Thursday, September 30, 2010, from 6:30 p.m.

Art Gallery of eye and hand

41 rue de Verneuil

75007 Paris

contact@agalom.com

www.african-paris.com

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Image Africa colors

AFRICA COLORS

exhibition from September 30 to December 6, 2010

This new exhibition offers a unique ethnic landscape through the theme of color in African art. Masks of War Dan masks Ibibio of Nigeria, Armand Auxiètre,

Gallery director "The eye and hand" presents a selection

representative works of customs or practices of these civilizations:

Pure and simple, the colors are chosen by the artists

to evoke in turn respect for ancestors, virility new initiates, death ... Gallery Eye and the Hand invite you to discover the symbolic

* Mask Anang, Language Arts Ibidio, Nigeria, XX, Wood and pigments.

According Fagg this hairstyle could mimic that of the wives of missionaries. This mask was probably made in the years 20/30 by famous sculptor Akpan Chukwu death in the early 50 or by one of his disciples.

Some features like the nose rounded chin bulging contours clearly defined eyes and lips that speak for attribution. Mask probably the same time and same sculptor is the Musée Barbier Muller.

Opening Thursday, September 30, 2010, from 6:30 p.m.

Art Gallery of eye and hand

41 rue de Verneuil

75007 Paris

contact@agalom.com

www.african-paris.com

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Image yaka

Arts of Africa first Black Arts Spring 1981 No. 77
When we examine the significance of an African mask, we do not seek to know what the "message" it provides, by virtue of some essential notion of disguise and by his presence, but rather what kind of continuum it belongs. The masks are at the confluence of pictorial traditions, oral and functional none appears (under secular unable to recognize the subjects and even less discernible. The understanding of pictorial code used requires not only a review but a review of developed components as needed through the original context. Let us offer an example of the image with respect to the buffalo in the region of Zaire Kwango-Kwilu South West (1).
Synceros caffer, the largest of African cattle is a massive animal, black, cropped hair, measuring 1.50 m at the shoulder and weighing nearly a ton (900 kg.) (Fig. 1). Its heavy horns have a spacing of one meter, are curved downward and inward and form large lumps to their bases. This animal, originally occupied the central, eastern and southern Africa, frequenting the open plains, open woods and river beds and marshes bordered by reeds. Commonly preview herds of a dozen to a hundred heads, he used to graze and graze the early morning and again at dusk, seeking shade during the hottest hours but sometimes moving at night . Females do not carry a calf for about eleven months.

Considered peaceful, was injured when he can become, for hunters, the most dangerous animal of any big game on the continent (Fig. 2). He is known for his

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Image African Art Exhibition of 1923

This is a copy of the catalogue of the exhibition of 1923 in Brooklyn Museum, In 1903 Stewart Culin became the founding curator of the department of ethnology at the museum of the Brooklyn institute of arts and sciences, now the Brooklyn museum Culin a self taught ethnologist built the foundation of four curatorial collections for the museum, acquiring objects representing African Asian native American and estaern European culture

 

 

 

Culin was among the first curator to recognize museum installation as an art form, he was also among the first to display ethnological as art objects, not as ethnographic specimens. This approach is evidenced in his exhibition “primitive negro art”

 

 

 

The exhibition opened in april 1923 and displayed African objects he had acquired in Europe from dealers. Along with his colleagues Culin set the parameters for cultural representation in museum through his collection decisions and innovative installations.

 

 

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Image 1923 - Brooklyn museum

This is a copy of the catalogue of the exhibition of 1923 in Brooklyn Museum, In 1903 Stewart Culin became the founding curator of the department of ethnology at the museum of the Brooklyn institute of arts and sciences, now the Brooklyn museum Culin a self taught ethnologist built the foundation of four curatorial collections for the museum, acquiring objects representing African Asian native American and estaern European culture

 

Culin was among the first curator to recognize museum installation as an art form, he was also among the first to display ethnological as art objects, not as ethnographic specimens. This approach is evidenced in his exhibition “primitive negro art”

 

The exhibition opened in april 1923 and displayed African objects he had acquired in Europe from dealers. Along with his colleagues Culin set the parameters for cultural representation in museum through his collection decisions and innovative installations.

 

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Who are the Baule?

About three million people living mainly in central Ivory Coast are defined as Baule. Yet after a closer study it semblairaient these men identify with villages or village clusters (ranging from 4 to 12) as an ethnic group. although the Baule ethnic reality remains msytérieuse can not be denying the existence of a style Baule. artists who use this style talk Baule and abroad their art is known as Baule for over a century.

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STRENGTH AND MEASUREMENT

The discovery of "primitive art": an art of strength
Shapes and shape functions
Deities and ancestors
The living wood

Force and Measurement

Develop an aesthetic of black Africa is seen as a risky business in many ways. Is it legitimate to isolate these objects, that today we call art, the general framework of their relations and their cultural constraints? Can we submit to a test that has never existed in the minds of their creators? And can we finally see in this art - if we 'take on this term - a uniform phenomenon, despite the wide variety of both regional and local styles we offer this huge continent, following lengthy Historical developments often poorly understood? Finally, remember that this approach excludes large regions, including Africa white, that is to say the Mediterranean area with its ancient history, the eastern and southern Africa whose pastoral peoples have given rise to cultures almost without images, and finally these hunting societies, which, even in our time have not passed the stage of evolution of prehistoric rock paintings which are the main evidence of an artistic production that appears at various points the continent. Similarly, we must exclude from our contribution to the aesthetics of black African art the old feudal societies, including Benin. Our discussion is therefore limited to large areas farmers, the true cradle of

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