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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'forest'

Facial Kwele mask with horns, Gabon
Facial Kwele mask with horns, Gabon
€ 150,000.00
 

Maitre de BULI ( Maitre de Katéba)

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POL P. GOSSIAUX 
 
Professeur d’Histoire et Ethno-sémiologie 
des arts africains à l’Université de Liège. 
 
 
 
Les Maîtres de Buli 
 
Esthétique et Ethno-histoire (avec deux inédits) 
 
 
 
En 1937, le hasard d'une exposition1 mit en présence deux sièges à 
cariatide « royaux »2 d'origine Luba (Zaïre) qui offraient entre eux de 
frappantes similitudes, tout en présentant d'étroites analogies avec la 
célèbre porteuse de coupe agenouillée, conservée au Musée de Tervuren3. 
Tout en entrant incontestablement dans l'orbe de la grande statuaire des 
Baluba (plus précisément du groupe des Bahemba-Bakunda), ces œuvres 
s'écartaient à tel point des canons esthétiques fondamentaux de ce peuple 
que l'organisateur de l'exposition, Fr. M. Olbrechts, acquit la conviction 
qu'elles étaient de la main
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The Authenticity of African Sculptures

by Henri Kamer

The issue of authenticity of African art has been central to collectors for decades.  Henri Kamer, who was president of the International Arts Experts Association at the time, published an outstanding account of the state of the matter in Artes d'Afrique Noire, No. 12 (1974).  The text  that follows is extracted from an English translation of that article, and has been edited further.  The original includes a number of illustrations.  They are not included here because I believe the text suffices without them. 

The original version, including the illustrations, in French and with the English translation, is 

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As a son of a German manufacturer and a Dutch mother spent Muensterberger a big part of his(its) infancy with his(its) grandmother in Haarlem, in the Netherlands. Together with Klaus Mann, son of Thomas Mann, he(it) visited in Germany also some years the ode forest school; he(it) spoke therefore from childhood German and Dutch.
Muensterberger took(accepted) a study of the medicine at the university of Heidelberg, however, changed after a term to Berlin to study there ethnology. Moreover, he(it) graduated an education in the psychoanalytic institute of the Berlin university.
The art collector, baron Eduard of the Heydt, a removed relative of his(its) mother, announced him with ethnographischer, African art. Muensterberger dedicated to him as thanks to his(its) work appeared in 1955 Sculpture of primitive One. By baron of the Heydt Muensterberger got to know the ethnologist Eckart von Sydow by whom he(it) visited of late lectures, which banker
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Pol P. Gossiaux
 
Professeur d’Histoire et Ethno-sémiologie
des arts africains à l’Université de Liège.
 
 
 
Les Maîtres de Buli
 
Esthétique et Ethno-histoire  (avec deux inédits)
 
 
 
En 1937, le hasard d'une exposition1 mit en présence deux sièges à cariatide « royaux »2 d'origine Luba (Zaïre) qui offraient entre eux de frappantes similitudes, tout en présentant d'étroites analogies avec la célèbre porteuse de coupe agenouillée, conservée au Musée de Tervuren3. Tout en entrant incontestablement dans l'orbe de la grande statuaire des Baluba (plus précisément du groupe des Bahemba-Bakunda), ces œuvres s'écartaient à tel point des canons esthétiques fondamentaux de ce peuple que l'organisateur de l'exposition, Fr. M. Olbrechts, acquit la conviction qu'elles étaient de la main d'un artiste unique dont le génie, profondément original, n'avait su se plier aux normes esthétiques imposées par la Tradition. « Pour la première fois, note M. Leiris, l'idée de l'individualité d'un sculpteur africain (était) mise en avant »4.
 
La porteuse de coupe de Tervuren, longtemps surnommée « Kabila la mendiante »5, avait par son originalité plastique et le profond mystère qu'elle semble receler intrigué de nombreux esthètes, des cubistes (C. Einstein) aux surréalistes (Ph. Soupault). Mais l'on attribuait volontiers ce
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African Art on the Internet
 
 
 
15th Triennial Symposium on African Art, Arts Council of the African Studies Association, 2011, Wednesday, March 23 - Saturday, March 26, 2011, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
http://www.acasaonline.org/conf_next.htm
Addis Art - Ethiopian Art and Artists Page
Contemporary Ethiopian art and artists - paintings, sculptures and digital art work by students and professionals from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University instructor, Getahun Assefa's paintings, drawings, sculpture, digital art. Also work by his brother, Tesfaye Assefa. Based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. [KF] http://www.addisart.com/
Addis Art - Nouveau Art from Ethiopia
Artists include Shiferaw Girma and Lulseged Retta. Photographs of each artist's work, a biography, and video. Founded by Mesai Haileleul. [KF] http://www.addis-art.com/
Adire African Textiles - Duncan Clarke
History, background, and photographs of adire, adinkra, kente, bogolan, Yoruba aso-oke, akwete, ewe, kuba, and nupe textiles. The symbolism of images is often provided. One can purchase textiles as well. Clarke's Ph.D. dissertation (School of Oriental and African Studies) is on Yoruba men's weaving. See also the Adire African Textiles blog. Based in London. http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/
Afewerk Tekle
"Ethiopia’s leading artist." Biography, his paintings, sculptures, mosaics, murals, art in the artist's home. Afewerk created the stained-glass windows at the entrance of Africa Hall, headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. "In 1964, he became the first winner of the Haile Selassie I prize for Fine Arts." "In 2000, he was one of the few chosen World Laureates by the council of the ABI on the occasion of the 27th
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Image Mbuti Design: Paintings by Pygmy Women of the Ituri Forest
MEURANT Georges, THOMPSON Robert Farris
Mbuti Design: Paintings by Pygmy Women of the Ituri Forest
 
Détails sur le produit:
Relié: 224 pages - Editeur: Thames & Hudson Inc - 1996 - Langue: Anglais 
ISBN-10: 0500974306 - ISBN-13: 978-0500974308
Descriptions du produit:
Thames & Hudson Inc, 1996. Hardcover. 300 x 245 mm. Brand New Book with Free Worldwide Delivery. The Mbuti people, who live in the Ituri rainforest of northeastern Zaire, are one of the few remaining hunter-gatherer cultures in the world. Since 3500 BC they have been famed for their rich arts of music and dancing, but until recently the barkcloth drawings and paintings originally made by the women as loincloths for ceremonies and dances have been virtually unknown in the west. The qualities of these drawings and their reflection of the Mbuti people's way of life, are explored and illustrated in this volume. The drawings are closely analyzed, examined both thematically and aesthetically, and the wider influence of African forager art forms on contemporary world art is
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Image THE HORSE RIDER IN AFRICAN ART
CHEMECHE George 
 
THE HORSE RIDER IN AFRICAN ART
 
 
Détails sur le produit:
Relié: 384 pages - Dimensione: 240 x 35 x 280 mm - Editeur: ANTIQUE COLLECTORS' CLUB Editions (29 juin 2011) - Langue: Anglais 
ISBN-10: 1851496343 - ISBN-13: 978-1851496341
CHEMECHE George - THE HORSE RIDER IN AFRICAN ART
Descriptions du produit
 
 
 
 
 
Descriptions du produit:
 
 
Note Libraio: 
Horses are very rare in Africa. The few to be found west of Sudan, from the lands of the Sahara and Sahel down to the fringes of the tropical forests, belong to the king, the chief warrior and to notable persons. Due to the dense humidity of the tropical rainforest and the deadly tsetse fly, only restricted numbers of horses survive. And yet rider and mount sculptures are common among the Dogon, Djenne, Bamana, Senufo and the Yoruba people. The Akan - Asante people of Ghana and the Kotoko of Chad produced a good deal of small casting brass and bronze sculptures. Some of the artists could barely even have caught a glimpse of a horse. This visually stunning book presents a wealth of African art depicting the horse and its rider in a variety of guises, from Epa masks and Yoruba divination cups to Dogon sculptures and Senufo carvings. In Mali, the Bamana, Boso and Somono ethnic groups still celebrate the festivals of the puppet masquerade. The final chapter of this book is dedicated to the art and cult of these festivals, which are still alive and well. It is not the habit of the African artist to provide intellectual statements for his work, yet his unique creative dynamic and far-searching vision does not conflict with that of
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Full text, digitalised by Lies Strijker and presented by the .Centre Aequatoria
Notes on the digitalisation and presentation


[Cover]

[1: empty]

[2]
IMPRIMI POTEST
Kanzenze, 12-2-1952
P. Simeon, o.m.f.
Sup. Reg.

IMPRIMATUR
Luabo-Kamina, 30-5-1952
+VICTOR PETRUS KEUPPENS
Vic. Ap. de Lulua


[3]

BANTU PHILOSOPHY
by
The Revd. Father PLACIDE TEMPELS

(Translated into English from "La Philosophie Bantoue" the French Version by Dr. A. Rubbens of Fr. Tempels' original work. The Revd. Colin King, M.A. Translator.)

With a Foreword to the English Edition by Dr Margaret Read, C.B.E.Ph. D.,M.A., formerly Professor of Education and Head of the Department Of Education in Tropical Areas, The

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Musées

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a
by Peter Walsh
 
"MEMORY: Luba Art and the Making of History," one of the largest and most important exhibitions of African art ever to appear in the Boston area, will be on view at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center from February 5 through June 7, 1998. Organized by The Museum for African Art in New York City, this critically acclaimed exhibition of exceptionally beautiful artworks explores for the first time in an American museum exhibition the intricate and fascinating culture of the Luba of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). More than 80 important and beautiful objects are included in the show.
 
Since it opened in New York City in February 1996, MEMORY has received enormous popular and critical praise. The New York Times described it as "everything an exhibition ought to be. Visually riveting and built on a theme as philosophically complex as it is poetic, it has the pace and pull of an unfolding epic... MEMORY... brings to vivid life an art that is both a wonder of formal invention... and a sovereign vehicle for profound ideas."
 
MEMORY will include standing figures, staffs of office, ceremonial weapons, masks, divining tools and amulets as well as fine examples of lukasas, or Luba "memory boards," all of which the Luba used as elaborate visual symbols to record their cultural memories, histories, traditions, and royal lineages. The show and its accompanying catalogue are the culmination of a decade of intense and path-breaking research and study
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The Yoruba


The term Yoruba describes both a language and a tribe living between Nigeria and the Republic of Benin, in an area covered by forests and savannah. Their history can be traced from the beginning of our millennium, with the civilization of Ife. Following the collapse of the kingdom of Ife kingdom of a number such as Oyo and Ijebu emerged, they in turn disintegrated during the 18th and 19th, but were revived by the colonial powers, to the end of the 19th. Today they are still the basis of the Yoruba political structure. The slave trade touched heavily Yoruba people of Nigeria and he contributed to their diaspora and the release of their rites and beliefs.


The Yoruba are prolific craftsmen, most Yoruba art objects dating from between the late 19 th and the middle of this century, and can sometimes be attributed to known artists by their names, which is an exception in African art.


During the XVI, the Ijebu kingdom, ruled areas near the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. copper imported by sailors, was traded by the Portuguese Ijebu and many bronze objects were created by their artists. These objects reflect the influence of their neighbors, the Kingdom of Benin. Nevertheless, their bells and bracelets scepters are usually decorated with figures, half human, half animal with eyes bulging and curved scars on his forehead.

The empire of Oyo between the XVII and XIX was located in the northern territories or peoples

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The Luba


The Luba Empire was founded in 1585, in the depression of the Upemba by King Kongholo, his nephew and successor Llunga Kalala, enlarges rapidly until the kingdom territory on the left bank of the River Lualaba. At the height of the kingdom more than a million people live in tribes, various paid tribute to King Luba. At the end of XIX with DVANCED Ovimbudu of Angola and the raids of slave traders Islamic empire s'affiblit and collapsed when the Belgian colonists arrived.

The economy lm'empire Luba came from payment of tribute and redistribution of resources from agriculture, fishing and hunting, and mining.

Luba artists have created many objects related to the activity of the court, the prestige objects were usually decorated with female figures everywhere in Luba art. Because of the huge area covered by the empire there are wide variations in the corpus stylistic art Luba.


Masks:


Luba masks rare, are found mainly in the eastern part of the empire. One type of mask Luba, very similar to the masks of kifwebe Songye but has more rounded features. There are very few zoomorphic masks.


Statues:


Luba artists have sculpted female statues standing or kneeling Mboko called, cleverly taking a cut, and who served during the ceremonies of divination. The statues stand uncommon, and probably representing the forest spirits or ancestors are covered with a

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Image Songye people

Linguistically, the Songye form part of the Luba, world, itself part of the Bantu group. Indeed there is a century old inter relation between the Songye and Luba, and they therefore share many cultural traits. Some art forms are part of this, shared heritage, according to the oral tradition the founding chieftains of the first luba kingdom, were of songye origins, and it is the Songye who introduced the idea of social stratification to the Luba and consequently the first luba chieftains are said to be of Songye Ancestry.

 

ENVIRONMENT

The Songye used to live in a forest environment till the end of the first half of the second millennium. Slowly their habitat became more savannah-like. We can still find traces of this former forest habitat in some of the art they produce. For example the costume worn with the Kifwebe mask must be entirely made from products originating in the forest from such as bark, pelts fibers etc. Today the Songye mainly live in the savannah but pockets of forest remain in their territory.

The Songye occupy a very large area in the north of the southeastern quadrant of the republic democratic of Congo.

Due to the vastness of the songye territory, it is obvious that regional stylistic, iconic and typological, exist in the ritual art produced. Some of these are the result of cross influences with their immediate neighbors.

 

NEIGHBORS

To the North of the Songye territory, live the Sungu, Tetela, the western Kusu. In the northwest we will find a few luba chiefdoms. To the west the Luntu, Luba – kassaï Kete and Binji peoples resides; one can even find pockets of Chokwe people in the southwest of Songye territory. To the south of the Songye we find a variety of luba speacking, polities, the same is true, for eastern frontier where in addition to the eastern kusu, we find Luba, Hemba, Kunda, Lumbu and Buyu people. Judging from their

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Image Gouro

Guro


Living among the Baule and Yaure west, the Malinke north and south wé and Bete. The Guro live in an area covered by savannah and forest. They migrated from the north during the XVI and is now number two hundred thousand, they were called but when Kweni were colonized between 1906 and 1912 the French invaders, gave them the name of Guro. Guro villages consist of round houses in the north and rectangular in the south. Each village is governed by a council of elders, representing each family, and secret societies. The Guru mainly grow cotton, rice, coffee and cocoa, men and women involved clearing plantations.

The Guro Art is an art and elegant masks consists mainly of elongated figures with a concave profile and almond eyes.


Masks:


Different types of masks can be noticed. In the western part of the country Guro masks have a pointed chin, a protruding mouth, almond-shaped eyes bulging and a high forehead sometimes decorated with scarification. They have an apotropaic function but are also worn by executioners during executions.

The southern style is influenced by that of the neighboring tribe, the Bete. Their masks are identifiable, thanks to their more naturalistic features, their scars on his forehead, triangular noses and eyes surrounded by incised scarification, they are sometimes called masks Guro-Bete

Another type of mask found in this region, has a bulging forehead, a snub nose

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dan


Image dan

Dan

In the also known under the name of Yacub, living in western Côte d'Ivoire and Liberia, in a wooded area south and covered by savannah in the north. At 350000 they live on cocoa cultivation of rice and cassava. Before that secret societies do not unite around the beginning of the century, Dan lived in autonomous villages, headed by a chief elected for its wealth and social position.

Nowadays society Leopard plays a major role in the lives of Dan: Candidates for initiation must pass a period of isolation in the forest three to four months. The dances are known for their festivals which were originally village ceremonies but who today are rather aimed at tourists during these holidays appear dancers often perched on stilts.

Masks:

Dan masks are characterized by a concave face, pointed chin a protruding mouth, high forehead and are often covered with a rich brown patina, masks of similar types exist throughout the country Dan, but some stylistic variations, can be observed. For example: the masks of the north dan often have delicate features, a high forehead smooth eye in the middle of the face and a very smooth patina obtained by immersing the mask in a mud bath. The masks of southern Dan Rather, protruding features and a grainy patina achieved by application of plant pigments.

Different types of masks exist and Dan each have a specific function.

Deangle the mask is characterized by a front line separated by a median of almond eyes, sometimes covered with kaolin, is worn

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Image yaka

Arts of Africa first Black Arts Spring 1981 No. 77
When we examine the significance of an African mask, we do not seek to know what the "message" it provides, by virtue of some essential notion of disguise and by his presence, but rather what kind of continuum it belongs. The masks are at the confluence of pictorial traditions, oral and functional none appears (under secular unable to recognize the subjects and even less discernible. The understanding of pictorial code used requires not only a review but a review of developed components as needed through the original context. Let us offer an example of the image with respect to the buffalo in the region of Zaire Kwango-Kwilu South West (1).
Synceros caffer, the largest of African cattle is a massive animal, black, cropped hair, measuring 1.50 m at the shoulder and weighing nearly a ton (900 kg.) (Fig. 1). Its heavy horns have a spacing of one meter, are curved downward and inward and form large lumps to their bases. This animal, originally occupied the central, eastern and southern Africa, frequenting the open plains, open woods and river beds and marshes bordered by reeds. Commonly preview herds of a dozen to a hundred heads, he used to graze and graze the early morning and again at dusk, seeking shade during the hottest hours but sometimes moving at night . Females do not carry a calf for about eleven months.

Considered peaceful, was injured when he can become, for hunters, the most dangerous animal of any big game on the continent (Fig. 2). He is known for his

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LES GRANDES EXPOSITIONS COLONIALES :

Les expositions coloniales furent organisées au XIXe siècle et dans la première moitié du XXe siècle dans les pays européens. Elles avaient pour but de montrer aux habitants de la Métropole les différentes facettes des colonies.
Les expositions coloniales donnaient lieu à des reconstitutions spectaculaires des environnements naturels et des monuments d'Afrique, d'Asie ou d'Océanie.
La mise en situation d'habitants des colonies, souvent déplacés de force, les fera qualifier dans les années 2000 de zoos humains.


La France compte alors 41,8 millions d'habitants et son Empire colonial, second derrière celui du Royaume-Uni, 67 823 000 personnes pour une superficie de 12 356 637 km².

1866 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Intercolonial Exhibition of Australasia)
1870 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Sydney (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1875 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Victorian Intercolonial Exhibition)
1876 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Brisbane (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1883 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale d'Amsterdam (Internationale Koloniale en Untvoerhandel Tentoonsellung)
1886 : Exposition Coloniale et Indienne de Londres (Colonial and Indian Exhibition)
1894 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale de Lyon. Elle vit l'assassinat du président de la République Sadi Carnot.
1894 : Exposition Insulaire et Coloniale de Porto (Exposição Insular e Colonial Portuguesa)
1898 : Exposition internationale et coloniale de Rochefort-sur-Mer
1902 : Indo China Exposition Française et Internationale de Hanoï
1902 :

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LES GRANDES EXPOSITIONS COLONIALES :

Les expositions coloniales furent organisées au XIXe siècle et dans la première moitié du XXe siècle dans les pays européens. Elles avaient pour but de montrer aux habitants de la Métropole les différentes facettes des colonies.
Les expositions coloniales donnaient lieu à des reconstitutions spectaculaires des environnements naturels et des monuments d'Afrique, d'Asie ou d'Océanie.
La mise en situation d'habitants des colonies, souvent déplacés de force, les fera qualifier dans les années 2000 de zoos humains.


La France compte alors 41,8 millions d'habitants et son Empire colonial, second derrière celui du Royaume-Uni, 67 823 000 personnes pour une superficie de 12 356 637 km².

1866 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Intercolonial Exhibition of Australasia)
1870 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Sydney (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1875 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Victorian Intercolonial Exhibition)
1876 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Brisbane (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1883 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale d'Amsterdam (Internationale Koloniale en Untvoerhandel Tentoonsellung)
1886 : Exposition Coloniale et Indienne de Londres (Colonial and Indian Exhibition)
1894 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale de Lyon. Elle vit l'assassinat du président de la République Sadi Carnot.
1894 : Exposition Insulaire et Coloniale de Porto (Exposição Insular e Colonial Portuguesa)
1898 : Exposition internationale et coloniale de Rochefort-sur-Mer
1902 : Indo China Exposition Française et Internationale de Hanoï
1902 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale des Etats-Unis de New York (United

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Image Exposition Fleuve Congo - les ethnies

The works are presented in a geographical journey of productions ranging from West to East, both from Gabon to Congo:

* The Fang peoples and related
* The Kwele
* The Mbede-Kota
* The Tsogho, Galwa, Aduma, Vuvi and Teke (Tsaayi)
* The Ngbaka, and Ngbandi Ngombe
* The Mbole, Yela, Metoko, Komo, Jong, Lengola and Kela
* The Lega and Bembe

THE FANG:

THE KWELE: they live on the northern border of the Republic of Congo, and have used a type of mask called Ekuk, they are flat masks, which have incised eyes, often a white face in a heart-shaped nose triangle-shaped eyes and coffee bean. these masks were hung in homes rarely worn during ceremonies, initiation Bwetes worship, their function was to conduct a village to enable forces are beneficial Bwetes capita.

THE KOTA: Living in the eastern part of Gabon, on the border with the Republic of Congo, Kota, include a number of tribes, such as Mahongwe the Sango, the Obamba, and Shamay, who practice the same rituals and shared cultural traits. They probably migrated southward during the 18th, and now live in the valley of the river, Ogonoué in a forest environment. from their economic resources, sutout hunting and agriculture. Kota the past, had the habit of leaving their dead exposed to the elements in the forest. Under the influence of neighboring tribes, they began to bury their cefs and keep their bones (mainly the skull) to place them with

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Congo River Exhibition from June 22 to October 3, 2010 - Quai Branly -
Practical information

Date: Tuesday, June 22, 2010
on Sunday, October 3, 2010

Times: Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays from 11h to 19h Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 11am to 21pm

Location: East Mezzanine

Fares: Ticket collections

37 Quai Branly
75007 Paris
01 56 61 70 00
Metro: Iena

EXPOSURE:

The Musée du Quai Branly This summer, through 170 documents and 80 major works, a major exhibition devoted to the artistic traditions of Central Africa, including Gabon, Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Real journey of leading the visitor of the northern forests to savannas, South exhibition demonstrates the links between works produced in the regions bordering the Congo River, for various populations of Bantu languages.

Behind the variety of masks and sculptures Fang, Hemba, kweli or kota, the exhibition highlights the major works of Central Africa, in their design, structure and artistic connections that bring them closer.

The three themes of the exhibition, common core to these peoples iconophiles are complementary:

    
* Masks and statues with the "heart-shaped face, and ensure the unity and identity of the respective groups;

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