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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'craft'

Facial Kwele mask with horns, Gabon
Facial Kwele mask with horns, Gabon
€ 150,000.00

 

The Authenticity of African Sculptures

by Henri Kamer

The issue of authenticity of African art has been central to collectors for decades.  Henri Kamer, who was president of the International Arts Experts Association at the time, published an outstanding account of the state of the matter in Artes d'Afrique Noire, No. 12 (1974).  The text  that follows is extracted from an English translation of that article, and has been edited further.  The original includes a number of illustrations.  They are not included here because I believe the text suffices without them. 

The original version, including the illustrations, in French and with the English translation, is 

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African Art on the Internet
 
 
 
15th Triennial Symposium on African Art, Arts Council of the African Studies Association, 2011, Wednesday, March 23 - Saturday, March 26, 2011, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
http://www.acasaonline.org/conf_next.htm
Addis Art - Ethiopian Art and Artists Page
Contemporary Ethiopian art and artists - paintings, sculptures and digital art work by students and professionals from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University instructor, Getahun Assefa's paintings, drawings, sculpture, digital art. Also work by his brother, Tesfaye Assefa. Based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. [KF] http://www.addisart.com/
Addis Art - Nouveau Art from Ethiopia
Artists include Shiferaw Girma and Lulseged Retta. Photographs of each artist's work, a biography, and video. Founded by Mesai Haileleul. [KF] http://www.addis-art.com/
Adire African Textiles - Duncan Clarke
History, background, and photographs of adire, adinkra, kente, bogolan, Yoruba aso-oke, akwete, ewe, kuba, and nupe textiles. The symbolism of images is often provided. One can purchase textiles as well. Clarke's Ph.D. dissertation (School of Oriental and African Studies) is on Yoruba men's weaving. See also the Adire African Textiles blog. Based in London. http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/
Afewerk Tekle
"Ethiopia’s leading artist." Biography, his paintings, sculptures, mosaics, murals, art in the artist's home. Afewerk created the stained-glass windows at the entrance of Africa Hall, headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. "In 1964, he became the first winner of the Haile Selassie I prize for Fine Arts." "In 2000, he was one of the few chosen World Laureates by the council of the ABI on the occasion of the 27th
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Image Art and craft in Africa: Everyday life, ritual, court art
MEYER Laure
Art and craft in Africa: Everyday life, ritual, court art
Détails sur le produit:
Broché: 207 pages - Editeur: Terrail, first English edition, 1995. - Langue: Anglais 
ISBN-10: 2879390982 - ISBN-13: 978-2879390987
Descriptions du produit:
Most museum exhibitions and books on African art focus on masks and figurative sculptures, largely ignoring many types of objects common in African cultures that "demonstrate an aesthetic sensibility all the more remarkable for serving the humblest of purposes." In this volume, Meyer offers a splendidly illustrated survey of everyday, primarily utilitarian objects furnishings, culinary utensils, textiles, jewelry, weapons, musical instruments, games, pipes, regalia, that reveal undeniable beauty of design, ornamentation, or display. Less detailed and scholarly than Roy Sieber's catalog African Furniture and Household Objects (Indiana Univ. Pr., 1980), Meyer's work nevertheless offers concise introductions to scores of categories of objects that are both essential to, and revealing of, the nature of African life. Highly recommended for public library collections of African studies or art. Dr. Eugene C. Burt, Art Inst. of Seattle
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Image Chokwe: Art and Initiation Among Chokwe and Related Peoples
JORDAN Manuel
Chokwe: Art and Initiation Among Chokwe and Related Peoples
 
Détails sur le produit: Broché: 191 pages Editeur: Prestel; Édition: illustrated edition (1 November 1998) Langue: Anglais - ISBN-10: 3791319973 - ISBN-13: 978-3791319971
 
Descrizione libro: Magnificently loaded with elegant plates of ceremonial and tribal objects from the Chokwe tribe and others in Angola, this exhibition catalog accompanies a show originating at the Birmingham Museum of Art in Alabama; editor Jordàn, who spent more than two years with the Chokwe and related tribes, is the museum's curator. The objects are mostly carved wood, but their polished, stylized vision of people and nature and the variety and especially the depth of feeling in masks raise them far above craft. The pieces are shown alone, as in a museum exhibit, with art stressed more than anthropology. To remedy this, seven scholarly articles by authorities on the Chokwe appear throughout, along with photos of native life. While this puts into context objects like whistles, thrones, and the intriguing divination baskets full of tiny magical charms, it has a somewhat choppy effect. One of a series of books on African art by Prestel (e.g., African Art from the Han Corey Collection, LJ 6/15/98), this covers a seldom-visited area rich in heritage. For larger art-oriented and college libraries.AGay W. Neale, Southside Virginia Community Coll. Lib.,
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Image NIGERIA IN COSTUME
DANFORD John - W.L. Stewart
NIGERIA IN COSTUME
 
Descrizione: The Shell Company of Nigeria Limited, 1960. Hardcover. John Danford (illustratore). First Edition. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall. Color painting illustrated. 103p. Fine copy in the original blue cloth. Publisher's deluxe full blue morocco stamped in gilt, minor rubbing of front hinge. Langue: Anglais. John Danford OBE was an artist working for the British Council in Nigeria; the Danford Collection of African Arts and Crafts is a nationally important collection at the University of Birmingham. These 48 full page colour reproductions of his paintings show the costumes, uniforms and ceremonial dress of the diverse peoples of Nigeria; the text describes the significance of the details. With a foreword by the Prime Minister of the Federation of Nigeria Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa. Preface by Mr. W L Stewart general manager of the Shell Company of Nigeria Limited with a blindstamp signature. Illustrations include: Benin woman chief in ceremonial dress, Festival dress for the Ekong dance Ibibio, Sir Ademola II Alake of Abeokuta, Base drummer, Ilorin local Administration police band, Mother and child Cameroons, Yoruba girl, Ilorin weaver and more. Unpaginated, navy cloth boards with bright gilt lettering on front board and spine, bright red endpapers. Boards slightly scuffed with mild edgewear; interior clean and crisp with no
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Full text, digitalised by Lies Strijker and presented by the .Centre Aequatoria
Notes on the digitalisation and presentation


[Cover]

[1: empty]

[2]
IMPRIMI POTEST
Kanzenze, 12-2-1952
P. Simeon, o.m.f.
Sup. Reg.

IMPRIMATUR
Luabo-Kamina, 30-5-1952
+VICTOR PETRUS KEUPPENS
Vic. Ap. de Lulua


[3]

BANTU PHILOSOPHY
by
The Revd. Father PLACIDE TEMPELS

(Translated into English from "La Philosophie Bantoue" the French Version by Dr. A. Rubbens of Fr. Tempels' original work. The Revd. Colin King, M.A. Translator.)

With a Foreword to the English Edition by Dr Margaret Read, C.B.E.Ph. D.,M.A., formerly Professor of Education and Head of the Department Of Education in Tropical Areas, The

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WHAT IS AFRICAN ART? 

SUPPORT NOTES FOR TEACHER

Learning & Information Department 
Telephone +44 (0)20 7323 8511/8854 
Facsimile +44 (0)20 7323 8855 
education@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk 
Great Russell Street 
London WC1B 3DG 
Switchboard +44 (0)20 7323 8000 
www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk 
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‘African Vision: The Walt Disney-Tishman African Art Collection’
 
This female figure, made of ivory and standing 37 inches tall, was made in the early Nineteenth Century by Edo peoples in the Benin kingdom court style, and was probably intended for an altar to a queen mother. It is one of the first two objects purchased by Paul and Ruth Tishman in 1959. "Ivory can be almost universally interpreted as a symbol of importance and wealth,” says exhibition curator Bryna Freyer.
WASHINGTON D.C.:Most Americans know little about the vast and diverse continent of Africa, much less the arts created there. Dark and primitive, the arts of the African peoples reflect the rituals of life, stripped to the most basic interpretive forms both conceptually and artistically.
Celebrating the arts of Africa and the profound role that they have played in molding Twentieth Century Abstraction and Modernist art in the "West" is the Smithsonian's newest exhibition, "African Vision: The Walt Disney-Tishman African Art Collection." It is on view through September 7, 2008, at The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art (NMAA).
 
"African Vision" showcases 88 outstanding artworks, part of a larger collection donated to the NMAA, that represents the largest gift of sculpture in the museum's history.
 
In 1959, Paul and Ruth Tishman began their collection with the purchase of two pieces of art from the Benin kingdom — an early Nineteenth Century ivory female figure standing 37 inches tall, made in the court style by the Edo peoples, and a 28-inch-tall, Eighteenth Century copper alloy mask that was worn by a divine-healer in masquerade
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Tribal Art - Jean-Baptiste BacquaSee the continuation... ]

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The Yoruba


The term Yoruba describes both a language and a tribe living between Nigeria and the Republic of Benin, in an area covered by forests and savannah. Their history can be traced from the beginning of our millennium, with the civilization of Ife. Following the collapse of the kingdom of Ife kingdom of a number such as Oyo and Ijebu emerged, they in turn disintegrated during the 18th and 19th, but were revived by the colonial powers, to the end of the 19th. Today they are still the basis of the Yoruba political structure. The slave trade touched heavily Yoruba people of Nigeria and he contributed to their diaspora and the release of their rites and beliefs.


The Yoruba are prolific craftsmen, most Yoruba art objects dating from between the late 19 th and the middle of this century, and can sometimes be attributed to known artists by their names, which is an exception in African art.


During the XVI, the Ijebu kingdom, ruled areas near the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. copper imported by sailors, was traded by the Portuguese Ijebu and many bronze objects were created by their artists. These objects reflect the influence of their neighbors, the Kingdom of Benin. Nevertheless, their bells and bracelets scepters are usually decorated with figures, half human, half animal with eyes bulging and curved scars on his forehead.

The empire of Oyo between the XVII and XIX was located in the northern territories or peoples

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Image yaka

Arts of Africa first Black Arts Spring 1981 No. 77
When we examine the significance of an African mask, we do not seek to know what the "message" it provides, by virtue of some essential notion of disguise and by his presence, but rather what kind of continuum it belongs. The masks are at the confluence of pictorial traditions, oral and functional none appears (under secular unable to recognize the subjects and even less discernible. The understanding of pictorial code used requires not only a review but a review of developed components as needed through the original context. Let us offer an example of the image with respect to the buffalo in the region of Zaire Kwango-Kwilu South West (1).
Synceros caffer, the largest of African cattle is a massive animal, black, cropped hair, measuring 1.50 m at the shoulder and weighing nearly a ton (900 kg.) (Fig. 1). Its heavy horns have a spacing of one meter, are curved downward and inward and form large lumps to their bases. This animal, originally occupied the central, eastern and southern Africa, frequenting the open plains, open woods and river beds and marshes bordered by reeds. Commonly preview herds of a dozen to a hundred heads, he used to graze and graze the early morning and again at dusk, seeking shade during the hottest hours but sometimes moving at night . Females do not carry a calf for about eleven months.

Considered peaceful, was injured when he can become, for hunters, the most dangerous animal of any big game on the continent (Fig. 2). He is known for his

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Image African Art Exhibition of 1923

This is a copy of the catalogue of the exhibition of 1923 in Brooklyn Museum, In 1903 Stewart Culin became the founding curator of the department of ethnology at the museum of the Brooklyn institute of arts and sciences, now the Brooklyn museum Culin a self taught ethnologist built the foundation of four curatorial collections for the museum, acquiring objects representing African Asian native American and estaern European culture

 

 

 

Culin was among the first curator to recognize museum installation as an art form, he was also among the first to display ethnological as art objects, not as ethnographic specimens. This approach is evidenced in his exhibition “primitive negro art”

 

 

 

The exhibition opened in april 1923 and displayed African objects he had acquired in Europe from dealers. Along with his colleagues Culin set the parameters for cultural representation in museum through his collection decisions and innovative installations.

 

 

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Image 1923 - Brooklyn museum

This is a copy of the catalogue of the exhibition of 1923 in Brooklyn Museum, In 1903 Stewart Culin became the founding curator of the department of ethnology at the museum of the Brooklyn institute of arts and sciences, now the Brooklyn museum Culin a self taught ethnologist built the foundation of four curatorial collections for the museum, acquiring objects representing African Asian native American and estaern European culture

 

Culin was among the first curator to recognize museum installation as an art form, he was also among the first to display ethnological as art objects, not as ethnographic specimens. This approach is evidenced in his exhibition “primitive negro art”

 

The exhibition opened in april 1923 and displayed African objects he had acquired in Europe from dealers. Along with his colleagues Culin set the parameters for cultural representation in museum through his collection decisions and innovative installations.

 

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Image Baoulé

Torque dignitary ancestors Baoulé
Height 31cm, Width 16cm, 7cm thickness
Côte d'Ivoire
Wood, patina



time: XVIII-XIX century
Susan M. Vogel "Baule Art" Yale - 1997 - p.222
Similar piece
Catalog Calmels-Cohen Paris June-2004
Experts: MM.A of Monbrison and P. Amrouche
Reference: p.38.39.40

Wood, Plant fibers, bakélite.Magnifique representation of the couple together all the criteria
of Baule sculpture sitting on a stool exquisitely decorated
geometric patterns, the two characters are face.On Presumably it is a royal couple by the presence
very many scars, tattoos in the neck,
extremely elaborate hairstyles, typical Baule;
man sports a goatee as the attribute of the Egyptian gods
the stool is finely crafted with a remarkable precision in
the line and detail of ornamentation;
The attitude of the two characters, arms along the body, clears
an atmosphere of great wisdom and serenity.
Provenance: ex al. Armand.Auxietre
ex al. Michel

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Image Coiffures africaines

Exhibition "African Hairstyles"

After the monographic exhibitions devoted to ethnic Mumuye and Bambara, the gallery's eye and the hand begins 2010 with an exhibition on the theme of the often overlooked African hairstyle. Often overlooked as belonging to the sphere of the arts "popular", hair is however of particular importance in Africa, both aesthetically and symbolically.

The hairstyle can both grow its appearance but also to affirm their identity or social status. Some hairstyles are immediately identifiable, such as hairstyling splayed Mangbetu of the Democratic Republic of Congo or the hairstyles solidified ocher Namibia. Others refer to a hierarchical system more complex. Ancient art, hair is also found in modern African art production, through paintings advertising kiosks hairdressers or barbers, or in African-American fashion. Both ornaments and symbols of identity, the hairstyles worn by different ethnic groups are reflected in their art. Although they represent gods or ancestors, masks and statues are the hairstyles of the living.

In Africa the hairstyle is still practiced by family members or trusted friends. In addition to the social aspects of the event, the hair, placed in the hands of enemies, could become an ingredient in the production of dangerous charms or "medicines" that could hurt their owners. Mostly it is women cap the women and men that cap men.

As scarification, hairstyles to identify gender, ethnicity, stage reached by the person in the cycle of life, status and personal taste. Scholars,

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STRENGTH AND MEASUREMENT

The discovery of "primitive art": an art of strength
Shapes and shape functions
Deities and ancestors
The living wood

Force and Measurement

Develop an aesthetic of black Africa is seen as a risky business in many ways. Is it legitimate to isolate these objects, that today we call art, the general framework of their relations and their cultural constraints? Can we submit to a test that has never existed in the minds of their creators? And can we finally see in this art - if we 'take on this term - a uniform phenomenon, despite the wide variety of both regional and local styles we offer this huge continent, following lengthy Historical developments often poorly understood? Finally, remember that this approach excludes large regions, including Africa white, that is to say the Mediterranean area with its ancient history, the eastern and southern Africa whose pastoral peoples have given rise to cultures almost without images, and finally these hunting societies, which, even in our time have not passed the stage of evolution of prehistoric rock paintings which are the main evidence of an artistic production that appears at various points the continent. Similarly, we must exclude from our contribution to the aesthetics of black African art the old feudal societies, including Benin. Our discussion is therefore limited to large areas farmers, the true cradle of

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Study on the sacred


Introduction
The sacred: the real paradigm
The flaw in the anthropological research of the sacred
The position of the African researcher
The inconsistency of the true-false paradigm of the irrational
The crucial importance of the event
Ancestor worship: in search of a definition
The premier event: the phenomenon agrarian
Biological Bases
The neurobiological underpinnings
Astronomical Foundations
Conclusion
Bibliography


Introduction


Welcome to this site dedicated to refuting the paradigm of the irrational use explicit about the facts of sacred archaic or traditional societies, and especially African societies.

As a member of these societies, the systematic use of the irrational as ultimate explanation of these facts is offensive and we might seem a lack of rigor in research.

In the approach to ethnology-anthropology there is always explicitly or implicitly begging the question that traditional societies through their culture could not produce something intellectually coherent. This profession of faith explains the systematic irrationality as an explanation of the ultimate sacred facts.

By irrational, what is heard is indeed something wrong, incoherent, that defies logic, in

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Work of art

A work of art, artwork, work or art object is a creation, such as an art object, design, architectural piece, musical work, literary composition, performance, film, conceptual art piece, or even computer program that is made and or valued primarily for an "artistic" rather than practical function. This article is concerned with the concept in the visual arts rather than music or literature, although similar issues arise in those fields.

Traditional media for visual works of art include: calligraphy, photography, carvings, gardens, ceramics, painting, prints, sculpture, drawings, photography or buildings. Since modernism, the field of fine art has expanded to include film, performance art, conceptual art, and video art.

What is perceived as a work of art differs between cultures and eras and by the meaning of the term "art" itself. From the Renaissance until the twentieth century, and to some extent still, Western art critics and the general western public tended not to define applied art or decorative art as works of art, or at least to accord them lower status than works, like paintings, with no practical use, according to the hierarchy of genres. Other cultures, for example Chinese and Islamic art have not made this distinction so strongly.

The related terms artwork and art object, used especially in American English, came into use in the 20th century, especially to describe modern and post-modern art, especially in works without significant skill or craft in creating the physical object. Some contemporary
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