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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

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Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
Ciwara mask, Bambara, Mali
€ 55,000.00

 

The Authenticity of African Sculptures

by Henri Kamer

The issue of authenticity of African art has been central to collectors for decades.  Henri Kamer, who was president of the International Arts Experts Association at the time, published an outstanding account of the state of the matter in Artes d'Afrique Noire, No. 12 (1974).  The text  that follows is extracted from an English translation of that article, and has been edited further.  The original includes a number of illustrations.  They are not included here because I believe the text suffices without them. 

The original version, including the illustrations, in French and with the English translation, is 

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African Art on the Internet
 
 
 
15th Triennial Symposium on African Art, Arts Council of the African Studies Association, 2011, Wednesday, March 23 - Saturday, March 26, 2011, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
http://www.acasaonline.org/conf_next.htm
Addis Art - Ethiopian Art and Artists Page
Contemporary Ethiopian art and artists - paintings, sculptures and digital art work by students and professionals from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University instructor, Getahun Assefa's paintings, drawings, sculpture, digital art. Also work by his brother, Tesfaye Assefa. Based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. [KF] http://www.addisart.com/
Addis Art - Nouveau Art from Ethiopia
Artists include Shiferaw Girma and Lulseged Retta. Photographs of each artist's work, a biography, and video. Founded by Mesai Haileleul. [KF] http://www.addis-art.com/
Adire African Textiles - Duncan Clarke
History, background, and photographs of adire, adinkra, kente, bogolan, Yoruba aso-oke, akwete, ewe, kuba, and nupe textiles. The symbolism of images is often provided. One can purchase textiles as well. Clarke's Ph.D. dissertation (School of Oriental and African Studies) is on Yoruba men's weaving. See also the Adire African Textiles blog. Based in London. http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/
Afewerk Tekle
"Ethiopia’s leading artist." Biography, his paintings, sculptures, mosaics, murals, art in the artist's home. Afewerk created the stained-glass windows at the entrance of Africa Hall, headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. "In 1964, he became the first winner of the Haile Selassie I prize for Fine Arts." "In 2000, he was one of the few chosen World Laureates by the council of the ABI on the occasion of the 27th
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Image Chokwe: Art and Initiation Among Chokwe and Related Peoples
JORDAN Manuel
Chokwe: Art and Initiation Among Chokwe and Related Peoples
 
Détails sur le produit: Broché: 191 pages Editeur: Prestel; Édition: illustrated edition (1 November 1998) Langue: Anglais - ISBN-10: 3791319973 - ISBN-13: 978-3791319971
 
Descrizione libro: Magnificently loaded with elegant plates of ceremonial and tribal objects from the Chokwe tribe and others in Angola, this exhibition catalog accompanies a show originating at the Birmingham Museum of Art in Alabama; editor Jordàn, who spent more than two years with the Chokwe and related tribes, is the museum's curator. The objects are mostly carved wood, but their polished, stylized vision of people and nature and the variety and especially the depth of feeling in masks raise them far above craft. The pieces are shown alone, as in a museum exhibit, with art stressed more than anthropology. To remedy this, seven scholarly articles by authorities on the Chokwe appear throughout, along with photos of native life. While this puts into context objects like whistles, thrones, and the intriguing divination baskets full of tiny magical charms, it has a somewhat choppy effect. One of a series of books on African art by Prestel (e.g., African Art from the Han Corey Collection, LJ 6/15/98), this covers a seldom-visited area rich in heritage. For larger art-oriented and college libraries.AGay W. Neale, Southside Virginia Community Coll. Lib.,
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Image Where Gods and Mortals Meet: Continuity and Renewal in Urhobo Art
FOSS Perkins
Where Gods and Mortals Meet: Continuity and Renewal in Urhobo Art
Détails sur le produit: - Relié: 152 pages - Editeur: Snoeck-Ducaji & Zoon; Édition: illustrated edition (10 mai 2004) - Langue: Anglais - ISBN-10: 9053495061 - ISBN-13: 978-9053495063
Book Description: The Urhobo peoples occupy the western fringe of the Niger River delta in southern Nigeria, an area rich with oil reserves. Since the 1970s, the petroleum industry has brought worldwide wealth and attention to Nigeria, but tragically has also detracted from broad-based economic progress as flow stations, flare-offs, drilling platforms and pipelines have proliferated. As rural economies suffered an inevitable decline, the custom of maintaining traditional Urhobo art has experienced a parallel atrophy. The resultant decline in Urhobo culture has prompted a response among many Urhobo who want to celebrate and preserve their traditions for future generations. The Museum for African Art in New York makes a major contribution to this effort through the presentation of Where Gods and Mortals meet, the first exhibition to showcase Urhobo arts. The exhibition introduces never-before-seen Urhobo art and footage of cultural performances, from yesterday and today. This accompanying catalogue includes approximately 80 works of art: traditional art from the historical period 1850 to 1975, including monumental wood figures, metal and clay sculpture, and masks and costumes with accompanying poetry and song; a small selection of contemporary work by Bruce Onobrakpeya, an Urhobo by birth and one of Africa's foremost artists; plus photos and video footage of extraordinary multimedia masquerades. Edited by Perkins Foss.Essays by John Picton, Perkins Foss, Michael Y. Nabofa, G.G. Darah, Tanure Ojaide, and Bruce Onobrakpeya. Foreword by Peter Ekeh. Hardcover, 9 x 12 in. / 152 pgs / 141 color and 7
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Image GLI ESPLORATORI ITALIANI IN AFRICA (2 Volumi)
DAINELLI Giotto
GLI ESPLORATORI ITALIANI IN AFRICA (2 Volumi)
 
 
Editore: UNIONE TIPOGRAFICO - EDITRICE TORINESE - 1960
Rilegato, pagg. 785 cm 26 x 16,5 - 198 figure nel testo - Lingua: Italiano
"LA CONQUISTA DELLA TERRA - Esploratori e esplorazioni"
Collezione diretta da Giotto Dainelli - Volume quarto della collezione
DAINELLI Giotto   -   GLI ESPLORATORI ITALIANI IN AFRICA
Biografia dell'autore
 
 
 
 
 
 
Biografia dell'autore
 
 
 
Giotto Dainelli
(Firenze 19.5 1878 – Firenze 16.11.1968)
 
 
Giotto Dainelli, figlio del generale Luigi e di Virginia Mari, nacque a Firenze il 19 maggio 1878. Vantava ascendenze illustri: il padre era imparentato con i carbonari e patrioti bolognesi Zambeccari e Ranuzzi; la madre era figlia dell’avvocato Adriano Mari (1813-1887), politico della destra che rivestì importanti cariche istituzionali. Trascorse la sua infanzia lontano da Firenze, a seguito dei cambiamenti delle sedi di servizio del padre, ed ebbe modo di conoscere l’Europa data l’abitudine della famiglia di approfittare delle vacanze estive per compiere viaggi all’estero.
Nel 1900 si laureò in Scienze naturali all’Istituto di studi superiori di Firenze, dove fu allievo del geologo e paleontologo padovano Carlo De Stefani (1851-1924), all’epoca il più illustre docente della materia (fu direttore dell’Istituto di Geologia di Firenze e accademico dei Lincei); in seguito si perfezionò all’Università di
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Image REGARDS SUR LES DOGON DU MALI
BEDAUX Rogier et VAN DER WAALS Diderik
 
REGARDS SUR LES DOGON DU MALI
 
Détails sur le produit:
 
Rijksmuseum / Snieck, 2004. Couverture rigide. très bel ouvrage sur les Dogon, proposant une vue d'ensemble du patrimoine culturel des Dogon: leur art, leur culture matèrielle, leur architecture et leur histoire. - ISBN 9789053494219
BAY G. Edna
Asen, Ancestors, and Vodun: Tracing Change in African Art
Détails sur le produit: Relié: 188 pages - Editeur: University of Illinois Press (15 avril 2008) - Langue: Anglais 
ISBN-10: 0252032551 - ISBN-13: 978-0252032554
Descrizione libro: Asen, metal sculptures of southern Benin, West Africa, are created to honour the dead and are meant to encourage interaction between visible and spiritual worlds in ancestral rites associated with the belief system known as vodun. Drawing on extensive fieldwork in the former Kingdom of Dahomey, Bay traces more than 150 years of transformations in the manufacture and symbolic meanings of asen against the backdrop of a slave-raiding monarchy, domination by French colonialism, and postcolonial political and social change. Bay expertly reads evidence of the area's turbulent history through analysis of asen motifs as she describes the diverse influences affecting the process of asen production from the point of their probable invention to their current decline in use. Paradoxically, asen represent a sacred African art form, yet are created using European materials and technologies and are embellished with figures drawn from tourist production. Bay's meticulously researched artistic and historical study is a fascinating Présentation de l'éditeur
 
Rijksmuseum voor Volkenkunde, Leyde. Gand: Editions Snoeck,
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Image Asen, Ancestors, and Vodun
BAY G. Edna
Asen, Ancestors, and Vodun: Tracing Change in African Art
Détails sur le produit: Relié: 188 pages - Editeur: University of Illinois Press (15 avril 2008) - Langue: Anglais 
ISBN-10: 0252032551 - ISBN-13: 978-0252032554
Descrizione libro: Asen, metal sculptures of southern Benin, West Africa, are created to honour the dead and are meant to encourage interaction between visible and spiritual worlds in ancestral rites associated with the belief system known as vodun. Drawing on extensive fieldwork in the former Kingdom of Dahomey, Bay traces more than 150 years of transformations in the manufacture and symbolic meanings of asen against the backdrop of a slave-raiding monarchy, domination by French colonialism, and postcolonial political and social change. Bay expertly reads evidence of the area's turbulent history through analysis of asen motifs as she describes the diverse influences affecting the process of asen production from the point of their probable invention to their current decline in use. Paradoxically, asen represent a sacred African art form, yet are created using European materials and technologies and are embellished with figures drawn from tourist production. Bay's meticulously researched artistic and historical study is a fascinating exploration of creativity and change within Benin's
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Image The Tribal Arts of Africa
BACQUART Jean-Baptiste
The Tribal Arts of Africa: Surveying Africa's Artistic Geography 
Détails sur le produit: ISBN 10: 0500282315 / 0-500-28231-5 / ISBN 13: 9780500282311 - Casa editrice: Thames & Hudson - Data di pubblicazione: 2002 - Legatura: Brossura - Pagine:240
Descrizione libro:
Thames Hudson Ltd, United Kingdom, 2002. Paperback. New edition. 305 x 225 mm. Brand New Book with Free Worldwide Delivery. This work displays and defines the fruits of thousands of years of black African creative endeavour. All the objects included were made by Africans for their own use, spanning a period from the beginning of the first millennium to the early 20th century, before the commercial production of art aimed at the tourist trade. Jean-Baptiste Bacquart, has divided Africa south of the Sahara into 49 cultural areas. Each section studies the most important tribe within the area, surveying its social and political structures as well as its artistic production. The art is analyzed according to type - in most instances masks, statues, and everyday objects, such as utensils, furniture and jewelry. Where appropriate, further information on artistically related tribes is then provided. Each section contains its own bibliography. A detailed reference section with information on key collectors, collections open to the public and a glossary completes this
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Full text, digitalised by Lies Strijker and presented by the .Centre Aequatoria
Notes on the digitalisation and presentation


[Cover]

[1: empty]

[2]
IMPRIMI POTEST
Kanzenze, 12-2-1952
P. Simeon, o.m.f.
Sup. Reg.

IMPRIMATUR
Luabo-Kamina, 30-5-1952
+VICTOR PETRUS KEUPPENS
Vic. Ap. de Lulua


[3]

BANTU PHILOSOPHY
by
The Revd. Father PLACIDE TEMPELS

(Translated into English from "La Philosophie Bantoue" the French Version by Dr. A. Rubbens of Fr. Tempels' original work. The Revd. Colin King, M.A. Translator.)

With a Foreword to the English Edition by Dr Margaret Read, C.B.E.Ph. D.,M.A., formerly Professor of Education and Head of the Department Of Education in Tropical Areas, The

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WHAT IS AFRICAN ART? 

SUPPORT NOTES FOR TEACHER

Learning & Information Department 
Telephone +44 (0)20 7323 8511/8854 
Facsimile +44 (0)20 7323 8855 
education@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk 
Great Russell Street 
London WC1B 3DG 
Switchboard +44 (0)20 7323 8000 
www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk 
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‘African Vision: The Walt Disney-Tishman African Art Collection’
 
This female figure, made of ivory and standing 37 inches tall, was made in the early Nineteenth Century by Edo peoples in the Benin kingdom court style, and was probably intended for an altar to a queen mother. It is one of the first two objects purchased by Paul and Ruth Tishman in 1959. "Ivory can be almost universally interpreted as a symbol of importance and wealth,” says exhibition curator Bryna Freyer.
WASHINGTON D.C.:Most Americans know little about the vast and diverse continent of Africa, much less the arts created there. Dark and primitive, the arts of the African peoples reflect the rituals of life, stripped to the most basic interpretive forms both conceptually and artistically.
Celebrating the arts of Africa and the profound role that they have played in molding Twentieth Century Abstraction and Modernist art in the "West" is the Smithsonian's newest exhibition, "African Vision: The Walt Disney-Tishman African Art Collection." It is on view through September 7, 2008, at The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art (NMAA).
 
"African Vision" showcases 88 outstanding artworks, part of a larger collection donated to the NMAA, that represents the largest gift of sculpture in the museum's history.
 
In 1959, Paul and Ruth Tishman began their collection with the purchase of two pieces of art from the Benin kingdom — an early Nineteenth Century ivory female figure standing 37 inches tall, made in the court style by the Edo peoples, and a 28-inch-tall, Eighteenth Century copper alloy mask that was worn by a divine-healer in masquerade
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Musées

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Tribal Art - Jean-Baptiste BacquaSee the continuation... ]

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a
by Peter Walsh
 
"MEMORY: Luba Art and the Making of History," one of the largest and most important exhibitions of African art ever to appear in the Boston area, will be on view at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center from February 5 through June 7, 1998. Organized by The Museum for African Art in New York City, this critically acclaimed exhibition of exceptionally beautiful artworks explores for the first time in an American museum exhibition the intricate and fascinating culture of the Luba of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). More than 80 important and beautiful objects are included in the show.
 
Since it opened in New York City in February 1996, MEMORY has received enormous popular and critical praise. The New York Times described it as "everything an exhibition ought to be. Visually riveting and built on a theme as philosophically complex as it is poetic, it has the pace and pull of an unfolding epic... MEMORY... brings to vivid life an art that is both a wonder of formal invention... and a sovereign vehicle for profound ideas."
 
MEMORY will include standing figures, staffs of office, ceremonial weapons, masks, divining tools and amulets as well as fine examples of lukasas, or Luba "memory boards," all of which the Luba used as elaborate visual symbols to record their cultural memories, histories, traditions, and royal lineages. The show and its accompanying catalogue are the culmination of a decade of intense and path-breaking research and study
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The Sejen bird figures of the Senufo People, Ivory Coast
The art of the Senufo people is quite popular nowadays, and their sculpture and masks are found in many European and American collections.  There are about 3 million Senufo living in the north of the Ivory Coast and the southern area of Mali. As in every country that was in touch with Islam and Christianity, many aspects of the traditional "native" culture were destroyed, especially in the 1950's where a new syncretic movment, "Massa or Alkora", was in the area.  There has been much French ethnologic field researchin that region.  Those pioneers had their own methods of acquiring pieces (that's another story).

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Kongo Nail Fetishes from the Chiloango River Area
By Ezio Bassani
 
Originally published in African Arts - April 1977, Volume X, Number 3
In the nineteenth century, ethnologists who collected and catalogued objects of art from Africa were not concerned with 
discovering the names of the artists or even their ethnic identities; usually, broad indications of geographic origins, such as 
"the Lower Congo," "the region of the White Nile," or the "River Uelle" were deemed sufficient identification. In addition, 
because these objects were regarded merely as documents of a mode of life inferior to that of Western societies, no effort 
was made to categorize them stylistically. Although during the first ten years of this century, French and German artists 
revealed the artistic independence and importance of African sculpture, scholars persisted in considering the works of 
African carvers as popular,
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The Nok civilization

The Nok civilization was discovered recently, in 1943 a fragment of a terracotta statue was unearthed in a tin mine near Nok on the Jos Plateau in central Nigeria. Following the discovery of other pieces of statues of high artistic quality were found near the city of Sokoto and creates lots of reactions when they appeared on the market of Western art. Since that date the statues from the city of Katsina still in northern Nigeria have been discovered, but like most of these magnificent statues excavated from unregulated very little information has reached us about their functions.

Several styles of terracotta statues were identified all dated between 400 BC and 200 AD there is currently very difficult to know if these styles correspond to different traditions or they are just regional variations.
More statues of styles, differences were found in the same regions, such as a number of terracotta-called classical style have been discovered in the region of Katsina to three hundred kilometers from their cultural center: the town of Nok.
It is likely that future research will give us more information on what is currently one of the great mysteries of African art.

The classical style known as Nok terracotta, includes statues of real size, with large elongated heads , hair forms developed and we identified them especially thanks to the eyes of an eyebrow and upper linear lower curve of an eyebrow, Their body is usually decorated with many jewels in terracotta, reminiscent of beads stones otherwise similar to those that were found during excavations.

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The Pende


The Pende pushed north by the Lunda, during the 17th, settled in an area located between Loango and Kasai regions. Two hundred years later Tchokwe invaded the territories for when they migrated north from Angola, but were forced to return the territories annexed by the Belgian colonizers. The 500000 Pende mainly farmers are not governed by a central authority but by the heads of households, known as the Djogo, sometimes aided by the noble nobles. Young men are organized by age group, and must pass through various initiatives including that of circumcision during adolescence.

Art Pende can be divided into two traditions, arts, the first comes from Western Pende who live along the river Lodango, the second focuses on the eastern Pende along the Kasai River.


Masks:

The Western Pende have used a dozen different types of masks during their ceremony, they have eyes looking down a triangular nose, and sometimes leaving a protruding mouth see the teeth.

Often found three types of masks in Western collections. The first long-beard is called Kiwoyo Muyombo. The second known Mangu, show the features distorted, probably evoking the effects of an epileptic seizure. The third mask Phumbu chief called, has a hair divided into three parts.

Masks and helmets masks, associated with Pende, Oriental Minyangi are called respectively, and Giphogo. Worn by dancers during initiation ceremonies, they have

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The Yoruba


The term Yoruba describes both a language and a tribe living between Nigeria and the Republic of Benin, in an area covered by forests and savannah. Their history can be traced from the beginning of our millennium, with the civilization of Ife. Following the collapse of the kingdom of Ife kingdom of a number such as Oyo and Ijebu emerged, they in turn disintegrated during the 18th and 19th, but were revived by the colonial powers, to the end of the 19th. Today they are still the basis of the Yoruba political structure. The slave trade touched heavily Yoruba people of Nigeria and he contributed to their diaspora and the release of their rites and beliefs.


The Yoruba are prolific craftsmen, most Yoruba art objects dating from between the late 19 th and the middle of this century, and can sometimes be attributed to known artists by their names, which is an exception in African art.


During the XVI, the Ijebu kingdom, ruled areas near the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. copper imported by sailors, was traded by the Portuguese Ijebu and many bronze objects were created by their artists. These objects reflect the influence of their neighbors, the Kingdom of Benin. Nevertheless, their bells and bracelets scepters are usually decorated with figures, half human, half animal with eyes bulging and curved scars on his forehead.

The empire of Oyo between the XVII and XIX was located in the northern territories or peoples

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