By continuing your visit to this site , you accept the use of cookies to provide content and services best suited to your interests.
 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'sculptures'

African art

African art constitutes one of the most diverse legacies on earth. Though many casual observers tend to generalize "traditional" African art, the continent is full of peoples, societies, and civilizations, each with a unique visual special culture. The definition also includes the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.

    * Emphasis on the human figure: The human figure has always been a the primary subject matter for most African art, and this emphasis even influenced certain European traditions. For example in the fifteenth century Portugal traded with the Sapi culture near the Ivory Coast in West Africa, who created elaborate ivory saltcellars that were hybrids of African and European designs, most notably in the addition of the human figure (the human figure typically did not appear in Portuguese saltcellars). The human figure may symbolize the living or the dead, may reference chiefs, dancers, or various trades such as drummers or hunters, or even may be an anthropomorphic representation of a god or have other votive function. Another common theme is the inter-morphosis of human and animal.

Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. 12th century A.D.

    * Visual abstraction: African artworks tend to favor visual abstraction over naturalistic representation. This is because many African artworks generalize stylistic norms. Ancient Egyptian art, also usually thought of as naturalistically depictive, makes use of highly abstracted and regimented visual canons, especially in painting, as well as the use of different colors to represent the qualities and characteristics of an individual being depicted.

    * Emphasis on sculpture: African artists
See the continuation... ]

Biennale de Dakar

La Biennale d'art africain contemporain de Dakar au Sénégal se tient depuis 1990. Son rôle est de mettre en avant la richesse de la création plastique de tout le continent africain, afin de la valoriser et de promouvoir.

La biennale c'est également des rencontres et des questionnements autour des arts numériques, de l’esthétique urbaine, des lieux de culture émergeant en Afrique...

Biennale de Dakar (2000)

Cette biennale était placée sur le thème des « Impressions d'Afrique ».

Artistes remarqués :

    * le sénégalais Abdérahmane Aïdara
    * le béninois Charly d'Almeida pour ses toiles sur le symbolisme du Vaudou
    * le casamançais Diakaria Badji pour ses toiles exprimant les déchirements, la souffrance et la tristesse de la condition humaine
    * le français Pascal Didier Even pour ses toiles inspirées par les rythmes et les couleurs de
See the continuation... ]

Art contemporain africain


L’Art contemporain africain est très dynamique. Il s'inspire aussi bien des traditions du continent que, et c'est de plus en plus le cas, des réalités urbaines contemporaines d'une Afrique en mutation, qui se cherche encore une identité. Les techniques et les supports sont variés, allant de la simple peinture aux installations avec projection vidéo, en passant par des sculptures faites en matériaux de récupération...
En 1989, l'exposition « Les magiciens de la terre » (Centre Pompidou, 1989) présentait des œuvres d'art africain contemporain (d'artistes vivants) pour la première fois en Europe, mode de monstration mettant en valeur un certain primitiviste et exotique. En 2005, l’exposition « Africa Remix » qui a été présentée en Allemagne, en Angleterre, en France et au Japon peut être considérée comme la première à présenter un panorama important de l'art contemporain spécifiquement africain, montrant surtout la richesse de l'art africain sub-saharien. Mais l'Afrique elle-même s'est dotée de centres d'art contemporain, de festivals ou biennales sont régulièrement organisés sur le continent pour mettre en valeur le talent des artistes d'aujourd'hui.

 Quelques artistes

Afrique du Sud

See the continuation... ]

Africa, Oceania and the Indigenous Americas


The Department oversees four separate collection segments: the arts of Africa, Egypt, the South Pacific and the Indigenous Americas. Reflecting current scholarship and geography, Egyptian art is now a sub-section of this department. African art thus consists of works from the rest of Africa other than Egypt.

African Art

The DIA’s African art collection ranks among the finest in the United States. It comprises some rare world-class works from nearly one hundred African cultures, predominantly from regions south of the Sahara desert. A diverse collection, ranging from sculpture to textiles to exquisite utilitarian wares, religious paraphernalia and bodily ornaments, it is heavily weighted toward the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

African art collecting is inextricably tied to the founding of the Detroit Institute of Arts at the turn of 20th century and remains one of the institution’s important hallmarks. From the late 1800s through the 1930s, generous contributions from some of Detroit’s first collectors, such as Frederick Stearns and Robert Tannahill, helped to develop the core collection. This included priceless works, such as several Benin royal brass sculptures, an exquisite 16th century Kongo Afro-Portuguese ivory knife container, a 17th century Owo ivory bracelet, a Kongo steatite funerary figure (ntadi) and a finely crafted Asante royal gold soul-washer’s badge recovered from the chamber of the nineteenth century Asante King, Kofi Karikari. Support from the City of Detroit has since aided the purchase of additional works of

See the continuation... ]

Masks

The viewing of masks is often restricted to certain peoples or places, even when used in performance, or masquerade. African masks manifest spirits of ancestors or nature as well as characters that are spiritual and social forces. During a masquerade, which is performed during ceremonial occasions such as agricultural, initiation, leadership and funerary rites, the mask becomes the otherworld being. When collected by Western cultures, masks are often displayed without their costume ensemble and lack the words, music and movement, or dance, that are integral to the context of African masquerades. Visually, masks are often a combination of human and animal traits. They can be made of wood, natural or man-made fibers, cloth and animal skin. Masks are usually worn with costumes and can, to some extent, be categorized by form, which includes face masks, crest masks, cap masks, helmet masks, shoulder masks, and fiber and body masks. Maskettes, which are shaped like masks, are smaller and are not worn on or over the face. They may be worn on an individual’s arm or hip or hung on a fence or other structure near the performance area.

Sculpture

The cultures of Africa have created a world-renowned tradition of three-dimensional and relief sculpture. Everyday and ceremonial works of great delicacy and surface detail are fashioned by artists using carving, modeling, smithing and casting techniques. Masks, figures, musical instruments, containers, furniture, tools and equipment are all part of the sculptor’s repertoire. The human figure is perhaps the most prominent sculptural form in Africa, as it has been for millennia. Male and female images in wood, ivory, bone, stone, earth, fired clay, iron and copper alloy embody cultural values, depict the ideal and represent spirits, ancestors and deities. Used in a broad range of contexts--initiation, healing, divination,
See the continuation... ]

Treasures marks the National Museum of African Art's 25th anniversary as a Smithsonian museum. The first in a new exhibition series, Treasuresis an old-fashioned show about African art, reminiscent of the exhibitions that represented avant-garde opinions of the early 20th century. In 1926, Paul Guillaume, Parisian connoisseur and collector, cautioned readers to defer learning about the history and meaning of African art until they had studied African art purely as an art form, because to do otherwise "tends to obscure one's vision of the objects as sculpture."

I chose the familiar--traditional sculpture--to reveal aesthetic variances, to see African art as form, not function. Treasures, therefore, is about visual exploration and aesthetic discovery. Our understanding of African art is prescribed by what we see, and often, what we see is based on works displayed in museums. So, "Treasures" is just that--a sampling that gives us a peek into the realm of African art.

Westerners and Africans alike revere well-made form. Each admires skillful technique and execution, exquisitely rendered forms, pattern, balance, symmetry, surface treatments and a sense of completeness. African artists, however, strive to portray more than that. As metaphor or symbol, their artworks embody the world of ideas and beliefs--confirming their notions about themselves, life and death, the universe and the spiritual realm. Yet, despite our cultural presumptions that separate art from life, often separating aesthetics from meaning, and our ignorance of or indifference to what it means and how it is used, African art astonishes.

An eclectic display of sculptures from East, West, Central, and southern Africa created between the 15th

See the continuation... ]

sculptures. Afrique, Asie, Océanie, Amériques

coédition musée du quai Branly et réunion des musées nationaux prix : 51,83 €référence : EK193771

Ouvrage collectif sous la direction de Jacques Kerchache, préfacé par le Président de la République. L'introduction est signée Jacques Kerchache. 

Quatre essais situent ces œuvres dans leur contexte historique et culturel.
Une cinquantaine d'auteurs, spécialistes, historiens, conservateurs, universitaires, chercheurs du monde entier se sont partagé l'analyse des cent treize chefs-d'œuvre présentés au musée du Louvre.

 

sommaire du catalogue

  • au regard des œuvres par Jacques Kerchache, conseiller scientifique au musée du quai Branly
  • les classiques de la sculpture africaine au Palais du Louvre par Jean-Louis Paudrat, maître de conférence à l'université de Paris I.
  • objets du Pacifique dans les collections publiques françaises par Sylviane Jacquemin
  • les objets nord-amérindiens dans les collections françaises par Marie Mauzé, docteur en anthropologie à l'Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales
  • objets des Amériques, reflets du Nouveau monde par Pascal Mongne, historien d'art

23 x 30 cm ; 472 pages ; 300

See the continuation... ]

What a body?


I have a body good to me, it seems, and that's because I'm me. I count among my properties and pretend to carry him on my full sovereignty. I think therefore unique and independent. But it is an illusion because there is no human society where it is believed that the body is worth by itself. Every body is created, not only by their fathers and mothers. It is not made by one who has it, but by others. No more in New Guinea, the Amazon or Africa than in Western Europe, it is thought as a thing. Instead, it is the particular form of relationship with the otherness that constitutes the person. Depending on the perspective of comparative anthropology adopted here is that other, respectively, the other sex, animal species, the dead or the divine (secularized in the modern age, in the teleology of living). Yes, my body is what reminds me that I find myself in a world populated by example, ancestors, gods, enemies or people of the opposite sex. My body really mine? It is he who I do not belong, I is not alone and that my destiny is to live in society.
Description

224 pages 24 x 26 cm

240 color illustrations

1 map

retail price: 45 €

isbn 2-915133-17-4

Co-published Branly / Flammarion
curator

See the continuation... ]

At a glance the Other


History of European eyes on Africa, America and Oceania

At a glance, and one devoted to successive visions brought by Europeans on the cultures of Africa, the Americas and Oceania. This program is a pretext to put into perspective by thematic series, the relativity of our eyes on the threshold of a new museum. Rather than return to the past, this catalog (and exhibition which is the source) marks a starting point.

From the Renaissance to today, the "idols of the Indians", "instruments of the natives," "primitive fetishes," "Negro Sculpture" or "first arts" were the witnesses of likes and dislikes, revealing reflections on otherness. The originality of this publication reflects historical depth that allows to include these objects in a broader history of art.

The Musée du Quai Branly appealed not only to works of other cultures, reflecting the first contacts with Europe, but also to European works within the midst of which they were placed. The catalog shows as well, in a strange series of chapters, how European eyes have gradually allowed other creations from, for example, curiosity amazed rankings systematic evolutionary wanderings of the images of the Universal.

Throughout the pages, the reader travels with the Nave of Charles V., Écouen treasure museum, portraits of Indians of Brazil painted in 1637 for the palace of the Prince of Nassau, rhinoceros horn cups Habsburg Pre-Columbian

See the continuation... ]

Ciwara


African chimeras

Masks, headdresses Ciwara are among the better known pieces of African art. Incomparable masterpieces cultures Bamana (Mali) and Senufo (Mali, Côte d'Ivoire), enigmatic and emblematic symbols of African art, clichés abound when talking about these famous head crests. There are few so-called traditional African sculptures which have aroused so much admiration from fans and collectors. This catalog is intended to fill this gap and provide a scientific focus on the subject. He cites the permeability of borders and artistic use of such objects do not come out only during agricultural rites but on several occasions during the year (entertainment, important ceremonies such as funerals, fight against bites snake, ...). It also highlights the richness of the museum, unique in international collections, with his fifty-five masks reproduced at the end of the book.
Description

96 pages format 20 x 26 cm

70 illustrations and 55 photos to the catalog raisonné

Maps

retail price: 25 €

isbn 2-915133-15-8 / 88-7439-318-0

Co-published Branly / 5 Continents
curator

Lorenz Homberger, Deputy Director of the Museum Rietberg, Zurich
authors

Jean-Paul Colleyn, study director at the EHESS

See the continuation... ]

Benin


Five Centuries of Royal Art

Produced by the Museum für Völkerkunde (Ethnology Museum) in Vienna, the Benin catalog, five centuries of royal art to discover the masterpieces of the art of court of the kingdom of Benin in the south of the Current Nigeria.

Reference book of over 500 pages, published this comprehensive retrospective, it includes an introduction to local traditions of Nigeria, reports on field research and the latest offers historico-cultural, symbolic and pictorial exhibits , crucial for the identity of the kingdom of Benin.

It is the perfect mirror of the exhibition that brings together for the first time in Europe, mostly from collections in England, Germany and Austria. All these works, a remarkable historical unity, draws a broad panorama of art and culture of the kingdom of Benin.

Treasures of mankind and blocks of museums around the world, beautiful bronzes and ivory carvings are at the heart of the course., Supplemented by maps, manuscripts and chronicles of travel, many clues for the reader of the immense wealth of the past in Nigeria.


five centuries of royal art


October 2, 2007-January 6, 2008

Curator: Barbara Plankensteiner, Director of Collections of Africa Museum of Ethnology in Vienna.

Produced by the Museum of Ethnology in Vienna, the Benin exhibition to discover the masterpieces of the art of court of the Kingdom of

See the continuation... ]

African ivory
February 19 to May 11, 2008


From the sixteenth century, a number of pieces of ivory carved by African artists, from areas that correspond to the mouth of the Congo, Sierra Leone and Nigeria today, came in aristocratic collections, less like objects curiosities than as exotic and luxurious pieces. This exhibition brings together twenty of the oldest African objects collected by Europeans and now kept in French collections, accompanied by documentary highlighting the historical depth of the African continent and its productions and the question of the use of iconographic between Europe and Africa. African ivory presents the public a little known aspect of the history of taste and art history.


Commissioner: EZIO BASSANI

Italian from Varese, a leading specialist in African art, Ezio Bassani began in 1973, to compile the catalog of African sculpture in museums in Italy. From 1977 he taught African art history at the Università Internazionale dell'Arte (UIA) in Florence.
Through his historical knowledge, he was appointed to the Scientific Committee of the University of Florence (UIA)., Editorial Committee of the journal Critica d'Arte, the Committee of Advisers international publishing the Journal of the History of Collections Oxford. He also served on the Scientific Council of the Mission foreshadowing Museum of Arts and Civilization (Musée du Quai Branly) in Paris.
Alongside these

See the continuation... ]

A little history ...

In 1981, during the opening of the gallery Amber, that arises the idea of gathering around the opening five to six colleagues antique arts primary and thus offer the public the first "Open House on non-European art "at the Sablon.

The project is successful, the key to success ... The idea was encrusted to the point of other galleries, Belgian and foreign.

In 1988, a pamphlet modest rally materializes this antique constantly growing, and three years later, the first edition of a catalog reflects the success of this consortium of antique dealers mobilized to the same object: to promote the exceptional richness of the arts which they are the first ambassadors.

Since 1996, antique Brussels even invited into their local foreign colleagues. Today, galleries French, Italian, Spanish, English, Dutch and American joined the event, giving an international dimension.

The Brussels Non European Art Fair has become one of the most important manifestations of non-European art, covering sectors as diverse as African art, Oceanic art, Indonesian art, pre-Columbian art or the Asian art and the art of Australian Aborigines.

Sculptures, masks, fetishes, guns, jewelry, coins, textiles, traditional objects carried by people for their use, wood, metal, gold, silver, bronze, ivory and terra cotta, the exhibits are ritual or domestic alliance shape and ornament.

See the continuation... ]

Qu’est-ce que les « arts premiers » ?
Expertise
jeudi 24 août 2006, par Nélia Dias

Source du document : Sciences Humaines
Auteur : Nélia Dias
Descriptif :

Sciences Humaines est un magazine de vulgarisation scientifique spécialisé dans les sciences de l’homme et de la société, qui existe depuis 1991.

Si la notion d’« arts premiers » n’est pas inscrite aujourd’hui au fronton du musée du Quai-Branly, c’est que de « premier » à « primitif », il n’y avait qu’un mauvais pas à franchir. Or un « musée des cultures du monde » ne peut plus être celui d’un regard colonial dépassé (Hors-Série n°3 de Sciences Humaines, juin 2006)
Nélia Dias est Professeur à l’Institut des sciences du travail et de l’entreprise de Lisbonne, elle a publié notamment « Ethnographie, arts et arts premiers : la question des désignations » (in collectif, Les Arts premiers, fondation Calouste-Gulbenkian, 2003)

Depuis une dizaine d'années, on assiste en France à un engouement nouveau mais controversé pour les « arts premiers », qui se manifeste dans les sphères de la presse, de l'édition, sur les rayons des librairies de musées, comme au Louvre, dans les ventes aux enchères et les expositions [1] .

D'où vient cet intérêt récent pour les arts non occidentaux ? Que recouvre la désignation « arts premiers » ? Comment expliquer ce que l'historien de l'art Ernst Gombrich appelait une « préférence pour le primitif [2] [2]  » ? Entraîne-t-elle le rejet de quelque
See the continuation... ]

Qu’est-ce que les « arts premiers » ?
Expertise
jeudi 24 août 2006, par Nélia Dias

Source du document : Sciences Humaines
Auteur : Nélia Dias
Descriptif :

Sciences Humaines est un magazine de vulgarisation scientifique spécialisé dans les sciences de l’homme et de la société, qui existe depuis 1991.


Si la notion d’« arts premiers » n’est pas inscrite aujourd’hui au fronton du musée du Quai-Branly, c’est que de « premier » à « primitif », il n’y avait qu’un mauvais pas à franchir. Or un « musée des cultures du monde » ne peut plus être celui d’un regard colonial dépassé (Hors-Série n°3 de Sciences Humaines, juin 2006)
Nélia Dias est Professeur à l’Institut des sciences du travail et de l’entreprise de Lisbonne, elle a publié notamment « Ethnographie, arts et arts premiers : la question des désignations » (in collectif, Les Arts premiers, fondation Calouste-Gulbenkian, 2003)


Depuis une dizaine d'années, on assiste en France à un engouement nouveau mais controversé pour les « arts premiers », qui se manifeste dans les sphères de la presse, de l'édition, sur les rayons des librairies de musées, comme au Louvre, dans les ventes aux enchères et les expositions [1] .

D'où vient cet intérêt récent pour les arts non occidentaux ? Que recouvre la désignation « arts premiers » ? Comment expliquer ce que l'historien de l'art Ernst Gombrich appelait une « préférence pour le primitif [2] [2]  » ? Entraîne-t-elle le rejet de quelque alternative
See the continuation... ]

parcours 2008 d e s m o n d e s
LE SALON INTERNATIONAL DES ARTS PREMIERS
Saint Germain des Prés
PARIS du 10 au 14 Septembre
info@parcours-des-mondes. comwww.parcours-des-mondes. com
Du 10 au 14 septembre, l’art tribal sera au coeur de Saint-Germain-des-Prés : pour sa septième édition, un
Parcours des mondes nouvelle formule, porté par de nouvelles ambitions et animé par une nouvelle équipe
réunira 63 des plus grandes galeries spécialisées à travers le monde, en provenance de 10 pays (France,
Belgique, Etats-Unis, Italie, Suisse, Canada, Espagne, Grande-Bretagne, Australie et Pays-Bas).
Une quarantaine de galeries internationales se mêleront ainsi à leurs homologues parisiens au long des
rues des Beaux-arts, de Seine, Jacques Callot, Visconti, Jacob, Guénégaud et Mazarine.
C’est dans ce périmètre de 25 000 m2 que seront présentées durant ces 5 jours les plus belles pièces d’art
d’Afrique, d’Océanie, d’Asie et des Amériques à un public de collectionneurs et d’amateurs d’art tribal venu
du monde entier. Les croisements entre art tribal et art contemporain seront également à l’honneur, à travers
diverses expositions et accrochages.
Dans un contexte très favorable au marché de l’art tribal, secteur en plein essor dont Paris est la première
place mondiale, ce sont plus de 50% de galeries étrangères qui participeront cette année à cet événement
de premier plan, qui s’adresse aussi bien au collectionneur chevronné qu’à l’amateur. L’art tribal a en

See the continuation... ]

2
3
SOMMAIRE
-Parcours des Mondes 6 ème Édition, Édito p.4
- Quelques mots sur le Marché de l’art p.6
-Liste des galeries participantes : p.8
-Présentation des Participants p.9
www.parcours-des-mondes. com
4
Parcours des Mondes, l’incontournable rendez-vous des
arts d’Afrique, des Amériques, d’Asie et d’Océanie, se tiendra à Paris
du 12 au 16 septembre 2007.
Vernissage le 11 septembre de 14 à 21 heures
Parcours des Mondes a sélectionné pour sa 6ème édition 53 marchands parmi les plus grands spécialistes
internationaux, tous réunis au coeur du quartier de Saint-Germain-des-Prés à Paris, du 12 au 16
septembre 2007. Ce rendez-vous parisien est désormais l’un des temps forts incontournables du
calendrier international du marché des arts d’Afrique, des Amériques, d’Asie et d’Océanie. Année
après année, les collectionneurs, les connaisseurs, les amateurs et les professionnels du monde entier (des
États-Unis, du Canada, d’Australie, mais aussi des pays européens comme l’Allemagne, l’Autriche,
l’Italie, la Suisse ou le Royaume-Uni) font le déplacement pour l’événement, enthousiasmés par la
richesse, la diversité et la qualité des oeuvres proposées, qui font la réputation du Parcours des Mondes
depuis sa création.
Pour cette nouvelle édition, le Parcours des Mondes s’enrichit de nouveaux venus : il accueille pour
l’art africain Charles-Wesley Hourdé (Art d’Afrique et d’Océanie) ; Sam Fogg (art d’Éthiopie et

See the continuation... ]

Parcours des Mondes
à saint-germain-des-prés
Dossier de presse
juin 2006
VERNISSAGE : MERCREDI 13 SEPTEMBRE DE 14H A 22H
Les Arts
d’Afrique,
des Amériques,
d’Asie
d’Océanie
www.parcours-des-mondes. com
LES MARCHANDS INTERNATIONAUX LES PLUS PRESTIGIEUX
REUNIS DU 14 AU 17 SEPTEMBRE 2006 – DE 11 HEURES A 19 HEURES
A SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRES, PARIS
14
17 septembre 2006
du 13 au 17 septembre 2006 Parcours des Mondes
le rendez-vous reconnu pour sa qualité
par les amateurs, les collectionneurs et les professionnels
Plus de 55 marchands internationaux, et une proposition sans égal d’oeuvres
rares provenant d’Afrique, des Amériques, d’Asie
& d’Océanie.
Une édition très attendue de KAOS Parcours des Mondes en cette rentrée
d’automne, qui s’impose parmi les événements de l’année 2006 marquée par
l’ouverture du musée du quai Branly. Les marchands, acteurs principaux du
marché de l’art dont le sérieux a fait la réputation de KAOS, S’inscrivent dans
une relation privilégiée avec la nouvelle institution française, dédiée au
patrimoine mondial.
KAOS Parcours des Mondes continue de s’affirmer par un choix rigoureux
des oeuvres, par des objets réservés pour l’occasion qui savent séduire des
collectionneurs du monde entier, venant expressément pour l’événement. Une
clientèle variée, prête à céder sur des objets pour un montant à cinq zéro, ou à
découvrir de véritables perles accessibles aux

See the continuation... ]

Primitive arts in Kaos
Le Journal des Arts - n ° 220 - September 9, 2005

The young Parisian journey Kaos has quickly become the global meeting place among lovers of primitive art. With a fourth edition even richer.
It took only two years at Kaos-Course Worlds in Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, home of the primitive arts, to win. Modeled on that of Bruneaf Brussels (Brussels Non European Art Fair), Kaos is an open event bringing together specialist dealers concentrated in one area (ie, exhibiting in their walls or hosted by other galleries). But while Bruneaf is losing momentum in recent years, Kaos is getting stronger. Created in 2002 from an idea by Rik Gadella (among other founder of Paris Photo), the appointment of Parisian art lovers first hosted the first year 21 galleries around the axis of the Rue de Seine, then 40 participants in 2003. The formula took off in 2004 with 51 exhibitors from around the world and has already reached international fame. This latest edition was also shown the excesses of the success of Kaos: merchants had refused leased spaces on the course to enjoy the commercial success generated by the event. Without dwelling on the subject, "not to do their advertising, its management announced a reinforcement of the signage" Kaos "to foreclose any parasites.

Must
This year, 55 galleries will open the festivities on the evening of Sept. 14, in a friendly atmosphere that gives the event a very special charm

See the continuation... ]

Thermoluminescence

La thermoluminescence est l'utilisation d'une propriété physique de certains cristaux qui a été mise au point dans les années 1950 comme méthode de datation, principalement des céramiques.

Principe de base simplifié

Un certain nombre de cristaux, comme le quartz, le feldspath, le zircon ont la propriété d'accumuler au cours du temps, sous forme d'énergie au niveau atomique, l'irradiation naturelle et cosmique du lieu où ils se trouvent. Quand ils sont ensuite soumis à une très forte température, ils restituent l'énergie accumulée sous forme de lumière (photons). Une fois refroidis, l'accumulation peut reprendre.

Utilisation pratique

Les cristaux présents dans les matériaux utilisés pour la confection de poteries, restituent la totalité de la charge énergétique accumulée au cours du temps géologique lors de leur cuisson. Il suffit ensuite de soumettre un échantillon une nouvelle fois à une température élevée afin de mesurer la lumière émise qui sera proportionnelle au temps écoulé entre les deux opérations. En tenant compte du niveau de radiation naturelle du milieu où a séjourné la céramique à dater et de la nature des cristaux en jeu, on obtient par un calcul la datation précise de l'échantillon. Cette technique est aussi applicable à des terres de foyer, des fours, des laves, et en général à tout milieu contenant les cristaux sensibles et ayant été soumis à des températures importantes dans le passé.

Limites de cette méthode

    * La
See the continuation... ]

Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Search
Translations
Menu
Newsletter
Links
Publicités