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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
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Result of the research Result of the research : 'masterpieces'

Benin


Five Centuries of Royal Art

Produced by the Museum für Völkerkunde (Ethnology Museum) in Vienna, the Benin catalog, five centuries of royal art to discover the masterpieces of the art of court of the kingdom of Benin in the south of the Current Nigeria.

Reference book of over 500 pages, published this comprehensive retrospective, it includes an introduction to local traditions of Nigeria, reports on field research and the latest offers historico-cultural, symbolic and pictorial exhibits , crucial for the identity of the kingdom of Benin.

It is the perfect mirror of the exhibition that brings together for the first time in Europe, mostly from collections in England, Germany and Austria. All these works, a remarkable historical unity, draws a broad panorama of art and culture of the kingdom of Benin.

Treasures of mankind and blocks of museums around the world, beautiful bronzes and ivory carvings are at the heart of the course., Supplemented by maps, manuscripts and chronicles of travel, many clues for the reader of the immense wealth of the past in Nigeria.


five centuries of royal art


October 2, 2007-January 6, 2008

Curator: Barbara Plankensteiner, Director of Collections of Africa Museum of Ethnology in Vienna.

Produced by the Museum of Ethnology in Vienna, the Benin exhibition to discover the masterpieces of the art of court of the Kingdom of

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African ivory
February 19 to May 11, 2008


From the sixteenth century, a number of pieces of ivory carved by African artists, from areas that correspond to the mouth of the Congo, Sierra Leone and Nigeria today, came in aristocratic collections, less like objects curiosities than as exotic and luxurious pieces. This exhibition brings together twenty of the oldest African objects collected by Europeans and now kept in French collections, accompanied by documentary highlighting the historical depth of the African continent and its productions and the question of the use of iconographic between Europe and Africa. African ivory presents the public a little known aspect of the history of taste and art history.


Commissioner: EZIO BASSANI

Italian from Varese, a leading specialist in African art, Ezio Bassani began in 1973, to compile the catalog of African sculpture in museums in Italy. From 1977 he taught African art history at the Università Internazionale dell'Arte (UIA) in Florence.
Through his historical knowledge, he was appointed to the Scientific Committee of the University of Florence (UIA)., Editorial Committee of the journal Critica d'Arte, the Committee of Advisers international publishing the Journal of the History of Collections Oxford. He also served on the Scientific Council of the Mission foreshadowing Museum of Arts and Civilization (Musée du Quai Branly) in Paris.
Alongside these

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Primitive arts in Kaos
Le Journal des Arts - n ° 220 - September 9, 2005

The young Parisian journey Kaos has quickly become the global meeting place among lovers of primitive art. With a fourth edition even richer.
It took only two years at Kaos-Course Worlds in Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, home of the primitive arts, to win. Modeled on that of Bruneaf Brussels (Brussels Non European Art Fair), Kaos is an open event bringing together specialist dealers concentrated in one area (ie, exhibiting in their walls or hosted by other galleries). But while Bruneaf is losing momentum in recent years, Kaos is getting stronger. Created in 2002 from an idea by Rik Gadella (among other founder of Paris Photo), the appointment of Parisian art lovers first hosted the first year 21 galleries around the axis of the Rue de Seine, then 40 participants in 2003. The formula took off in 2004 with 51 exhibitors from around the world and has already reached international fame. This latest edition was also shown the excesses of the success of Kaos: merchants had refused leased spaces on the course to enjoy the commercial success generated by the event. Without dwelling on the subject, "not to do their advertising, its management announced a reinforcement of the signage" Kaos "to foreclose any parasites.

Must
This year, 55 galleries will open the festivities on the evening of Sept. 14, in a friendly atmosphere that gives the event a very special charm

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Museo Etnografico Africa-Mozambico
Bari

The artifacts come from the African Mission of Capuchin firars in Mozambique: they include masks, musical instruments, objetcs made of ivory as well as a lot of documents.

Museo Villaggio Africano
Basella di Urgnano

The works exhibited in this museum-village since 1984 come from the collection of a Passionist Missionaries, a religious congregation founded in 1743. Tribal handcraft works are on display in the museum-village but some are also for sale. The profits go to the congregation whicj helps people in Africa. The objects come mainly from Sub-Saharan Africa (Dogon, Baule, Mahongwe).

Museo Civico di Scienze Naturali "Enrico Caffi"
Bergamo

The museum was born in 1917 when the cabinet of curiosities of the Royal Technical Institute was merged with several private collections of the area. After several places, it was finally established in the sumptuous Piazza Cittadella palace in 1960. The ethnographical section just opened: the largest part of the collection was brought back by Costantino Beltrami, who "discovered" the source of the Mississipi River; it includes
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Image Songye masks

 

The linear decoration, signature Songye.

All masks are decorated Kifwebe type linear alternating stripes and white stripes, black and red too, whose purpose is yet unknown. The masks have formal and stylistic features interesting and original. They are often large size, including male pattern masks topped by huge peaks. The deformations in the face made the projection in front of the mouth and eyes is probably unique in the history of art. The resulting creations of great beauty and immense. Very modern, they are without doubt among the masterpieces of art.

Despite their similarities, the functions of these masks are different since the male mask Kifwebe Songye, easily recognizable by the existence of a ridge, because the police and the female mask Songye fate on the occasion of inauguration ceremonies or funerals of dignitaries.

The colors are symbolic, like shapes, they indicate "sex" of the mask but also its potential magic. The white female still has a form of benevolence. Black is associated with occult qualities of the mask. The black streaks are intended to conceal malicious aspects of the mask to the uninitiated. Red is associated with blood, fire, but also the courage, strength, and knowledge.

African Art / African Art / primitive art / primitive art / primitive arts / art gallery / art Tribal / Tribal Art / Africa / Africa / eye and hand / first art gallery / buy / sell / expertise / expert / exposure /

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Image Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti (October 10, 1901 – January 11, 1966) was a Swiss sculptor, painter, draftsman, and printmaker.


Biography

Early life

Alberto Giacometti was born in Borgonovo, now part of the Swiss municipality of Stampa, near the Italian border. His father, Giovanni Giacometti, was a painter. Alberto attended the School of Fine Arts in Geneva. In 1922 he moved to Paris to study under the sculptor Antoine Bourdelle, an associate of Auguste Rodin. It was there that Giacometti experimented with cubism and surrealism and came to be regarded as one of the leading surrealist sculptors. Among his associates were Joan Miró, Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso and Balthus.

Between 1936 and 1940, Giacometti concentrated his sculpting on the human head, focusing on the model's gaze, followed by a unique artistic phase in which his statues became stretched out; their limbs elongated. Obsessed with creating his sculptures exactly as he envisioned through his unique view of reality, he often carved until they were as thin as nails and reduced to the size of a pack of cigarettes, much to his consternation. A friend of his once said that if Giacometti decided to sculpt you, "he would make your head look like the blade of a knife." After his marriage his tiny sculptures became larger, but the larger they grew, the thinner they became. Giacometti said that the final result
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Black African Literature
Modern literature of Black Africa lies at the confluence of various trends: its
own traditions and diverse, the impact of Islamic and Arab worlds;
the pervasive influence of European colonialism and Christianity. Africans
have been particularly prolific since the Second World War;
using French, English, Portuguese and more than forty African languages, they
made up of poetry, fiction, drama, and invented forms of writing
for which there is no description in the European literary world. Their
works portray the modern political and social reality, and focus on
value systems, whether or not African. At the same time, their writings
are based on indigenous traditions and world views typically
Africa.
Long before Europeans arrived, even before the development of writing,
peoples of sub-Saharan Africa have expressed their thoughts in an artistic manner,
their feelings and concerns the deepest in the form of myths,
legends, allegories, parables and stories, songs and chants from
poems, proverbs, riddles and theater. Some traditional forms of
oral literature have survived until today, while new forms do
cease to

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art is an art museum located on the eastern edge of Central Park, along what is known as Museum Mile in New York City, USA. It has a permanent collection containing more than two million works of art, divided into nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, often referred to simply as "the Met," is one of the world's largest art galleries, and has a much smaller second location in Upper Manhattan, at "The Cloisters," which features medieval art.

Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. A number of notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. It opened on February 20, 1872, and was originally located at 681 Fifth Avenue.

As of 2007, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet.
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The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture situated in London. Its collections, which number more than 7 million objects, are among the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its beginning to the present.

The British Museum was established in 1753, largely based on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. The museum first opened to the public on 15 January 1759 in Montagu House in Bloomsbury, on the site of the current museum building. Its expansion over the following two and a half centuries has resulted in the creation of several branch institutions, the first being the British Museum of Natural History in South Kensington in 1887. Until 1997, when the current British Library building opened to the public, replacing the old British Museum Reading Room, the British Museum was unique in that it housed both a national museum of antiquities and a national library in the same building.

The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. As with all other national museums and art galleries in Britain, the Museum charges no admission fee, although charges are levied for some temporary special exhibitions. Since 2001 the director of the Museum has been Neil MacGregor.

History

Though principally a museum of cultural art objects and antiquities today, the British Museum was founded as a "universal museum". Its foundations lie in the will of the physician and naturalist Sir Hans Sloane (1660–1753). During the course of his lifetime Sloane gathered an enviable collection of curiosities and whilst not wishing to see his collection broken up after death, he bequeathed it to King George II, for the nation, for the princely sum of £20,000.

At that time,
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Sculpture dedicated to Gou divinity of wrought iron and war
Work iron 168cm in height made before 1858 by Akati Ekplékendo
Current Republic of Benin

Lauren Papet, Ecole du Louvre


Arrival in French collections and identification problems

This statue has been reported in France in 1894 by Captain Eugene Fonssagrives following the conquest of Dahomey. It belonged to the spoils of war found in the palaces of Abomey, abandoned by the fleeing King Behanzin, who himself had perhaps made on the side in preparation for the French attack in the hope that the god help protect the kingdom on its most vulnerable border. She was then given directly to the Trocadero Museum of Ethnography, the current Museum of Man (recorded April 30, 1894).

First Fonssagrives was presented as was a representation of Ebo, patron god of Ouidah thesis refuted by Maurice Delafosse in 1894, indicating that the divinity of Ouidah is not the serpent but Ebo Dan. The name "Ebo" would have probably been given Fonssagrives response when he asked what the object (Bo meaning receptacle of supernatural forces). She was named Gou, its present name after World War II, his resemblance to the voodoo (god) of iron and protector of the forge, metal and war have been considered fairly obvious.

Technical Achievement

Government also has a variety of techniques to work with iron: forged, rolled, hammered, nailed and riveted.

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David Norden
http://users.telenet.be/african-shop/kerchache.htm

In a crucial moment for the world of Tribal Arts, Ana &Antonio Casanovas from Arte y Ritual and Alain Bovis Gallery present two consecutive exhibitions in Paris with a selection of masterworks from the Kerchache collection:

1.”HOMMAGE” June 16-July 22 2006
2. “NIGERIA” September 13th –October 20th 2006

“HOMAGE TO JACQUES KERCHACHE”

WHY?

The Quai Branly

We want to pay an HOMAGE to Jacques Kerchache and , in his name, give support to an important historical event : the opening of the Quai Branly,one of the most important museums in the world dedicated entirely to “les Arts Premiers”. Jacques was first appointed to asses the selection of art works for the “Pavillion des Sessions” in the Louvre Museum which was conceived as an antennae of the Quai Branly.He had a crucial role in the creation of this innovative museum and was an important member of the Acquisition Committee.

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