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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'statuary'

African Art on the Internet
 
 
 
15th Triennial Symposium on African Art, Arts Council of the African Studies Association, 2011, Wednesday, March 23 - Saturday, March 26, 2011, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
http://www.acasaonline.org/conf_next.htm
Addis Art - Ethiopian Art and Artists Page
Contemporary Ethiopian art and artists - paintings, sculptures and digital art work by students and professionals from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University instructor, Getahun Assefa's paintings, drawings, sculpture, digital art. Also work by his brother, Tesfaye Assefa. Based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. [KF] http://www.addisart.com/
Addis Art - Nouveau Art from Ethiopia
Artists include Shiferaw Girma and Lulseged Retta. Photographs of each artist's work, a biography, and video. Founded by Mesai Haileleul. [KF] http://www.addis-art.com/
Adire African Textiles - Duncan Clarke
History, background, and photographs of adire, adinkra, kente, bogolan, Yoruba aso-oke, akwete, ewe, kuba, and nupe textiles. The symbolism of images is often provided. One can purchase textiles as well. Clarke's Ph.D. dissertation (School of Oriental and African Studies) is on Yoruba men's weaving. See also the Adire African Textiles blog. Based in London. http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/
Afewerk Tekle
"Ethiopia’s leading artist." Biography, his paintings, sculptures, mosaics, murals, art in the artist's home. Afewerk created the stained-glass windows at the entrance of Africa Hall, headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. "In 1964, he became the first winner of the Haile Selassie I prize for Fine Arts." "In 2000, he was one of the few chosen World Laureates by the council of the ABI on the occasion of the 27th
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Image Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
FARDON Richard and STELZIG Christine
 
Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
 
 
Détails sur le produit:
 
Relié: 160 pages - Editeur: Saffron Books (15 septembre 2005) - Collection: Saffron Afriscopes - Langue: Anglais - ISBN-10: 1872843468 - ISBN-13: 978-1872843469
FARDON Richard and STELZIG Christine: 
Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
Descriptions du produit: Descrizione libro
 
 
 
 
 
Descriptions du produit:
 
 
 
Descrizione libro
 
Saffron Books [EAP London], 2005. Hardcover. 1st Edition. "Column to Volume: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary" investigates the appearance on world art markets during the 1970s of statues identified as Chamba from West Africa. Sought after for their artful execution, these statues were stylistically unlike anything previously documented from the region. Are they what the art market claimed? Who made them, when, where and why?To answer these questions, Richard Fardon and Christine Stelzig had to combine the findings of ethnographic research in Cameroon and Nigeria with museum and archival research and the testimonies of art dealers and collectors. Profusely illustrated, "Column to Volume" offers a comprehensive account of an important sculptural tradition in West Africa, as well as fascinating insights into the tribal branding, distribution, and copying, of African art works during the 1970s.Identifying formal innovation in what has been described as 'tribal' tradition, not least by tracing the individual sculptor irresponsible for
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Image Statuary from the pre-Bembe Hunters
BIEBUYCK  P. Daniel
 
Statuary from the pre-Bembe Hunters. Issues in the interpretation of ancestral figurines ascribed to the Basikasingo-Bembe-Boyo.
 
 
 
Descrizione libro:
 
EDITOR: The Royal Museum of Central Africa - Tervuren - Belgium 1981. 
Statuary in the collections of the Royal Museum of Central Africa.
Langue: Anglais - Soft cover, 164 pp, 6 color and 145 b/w illus, 32 line drgs,
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Image DOGON

Dogon

Musée du Quai Branly
05th April 2011 to July 4, 2011

The exhibition features 330 stunning art pieces gathered for the first time and from collections around the world. It provides a chronological overview of the art of the Dogon eighth century to the present day, reflecting its rich diversity of styles, from first contact with Tellem to the development of European taste for the masks and sculpture in the twentieth century. The exhibition shows the impact of migration and subsequent contact with other Dogon peoples of the region's culture and art Dogon. It places a unique technical expertise conducted on the patina of statues and disclaims typologies of everyday objects and daily virtuosic and varied techniques, often presented in terms of major pieces of statuary.

primitive art
Sixteenth century seventeenth century eighteenth century nineteenth century twentieth century
Commissioners
Helene

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LES GRANDES EXPOSITIONS COLONIALES :

Les expositions coloniales furent organisées au XIXe siècle et dans la première moitié du XXe siècle dans les pays européens. Elles avaient pour but de montrer aux habitants de la Métropole les différentes facettes des colonies.
Les expositions coloniales donnaient lieu à des reconstitutions spectaculaires des environnements naturels et des monuments d'Afrique, d'Asie ou d'Océanie.
La mise en situation d'habitants des colonies, souvent déplacés de force, les fera qualifier dans les années 2000 de zoos humains.


La France compte alors 41,8 millions d'habitants et son Empire colonial, second derrière celui du Royaume-Uni, 67 823 000 personnes pour une superficie de 12 356 637 km².

1866 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Intercolonial Exhibition of Australasia)
1870 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Sydney (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1875 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Victorian Intercolonial Exhibition)
1876 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Brisbane (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1883 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale d'Amsterdam (Internationale Koloniale en Untvoerhandel Tentoonsellung)
1886 : Exposition Coloniale et Indienne de Londres (Colonial and Indian Exhibition)
1894 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale de Lyon. Elle vit l'assassinat du président de la République Sadi Carnot.
1894 : Exposition Insulaire et Coloniale de Porto (Exposição Insular e Colonial Portuguesa)
1898 : Exposition internationale et coloniale de Rochefort-sur-Mer
1902 : Indo China Exposition Française et Internationale de Hanoï
1902 :

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LES GRANDES EXPOSITIONS COLONIALES :

Les expositions coloniales furent organisées au XIXe siècle et dans la première moitié du XXe siècle dans les pays européens. Elles avaient pour but de montrer aux habitants de la Métropole les différentes facettes des colonies.
Les expositions coloniales donnaient lieu à des reconstitutions spectaculaires des environnements naturels et des monuments d'Afrique, d'Asie ou d'Océanie.
La mise en situation d'habitants des colonies, souvent déplacés de force, les fera qualifier dans les années 2000 de zoos humains.


La France compte alors 41,8 millions d'habitants et son Empire colonial, second derrière celui du Royaume-Uni, 67 823 000 personnes pour une superficie de 12 356 637 km².

1866 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Intercolonial Exhibition of Australasia)
1870 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Sydney (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1875 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Melbourne (Victorian Intercolonial Exhibition)
1876 : Exposition Intercoloniale de Brisbane (Intercolonial Exhibition)
1883 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale d'Amsterdam (Internationale Koloniale en Untvoerhandel Tentoonsellung)
1886 : Exposition Coloniale et Indienne de Londres (Colonial and Indian Exhibition)
1894 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale de Lyon. Elle vit l'assassinat du président de la République Sadi Carnot.
1894 : Exposition Insulaire et Coloniale de Porto (Exposição Insular e Colonial Portuguesa)
1898 : Exposition internationale et coloniale de Rochefort-sur-Mer
1902 : Indo China Exposition Française et Internationale de Hanoï
1902 : Exposition Internationale et Coloniale des Etats-Unis de New York (United

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AFRICAN SCULPTURE

Introduction
Context of African sculpture
Places of traditional African sculpture
Canons of African sculpture
Techniques and creative
Aesthetic
Role of African sculpture in the middle
Universal impact of African sculpture
Bibliographic


Introduction

Never has been written about as much ink as traditional African sculpture. Ever, despite all attempts, the man has managed to evacuate his mental field, much less its history, that is to say of his encounter with the other. It has been a cornerstone to measure the "civilization" of the black man and his ability to create capacity variously appreciated throughout history until early this century, cubism helping, the unanimously begins to make the exceptional nature of African sculpture that was always confused with African art which it is a party, probably the most important, if one were to judge solely by the number Parts created that we have reached.

Context of African sculpture

We can talk about African sculpture in isolation from the rest of the arts of Africa south of Sahara. Every word in this area is responsible not only meaningless but history, and if we chose the term "African art" is to fully assume all we have inherited from the past in

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African art

African art constitutes one of the most diverse legacies on earth. Though many casual observers tend to generalize "traditional" African art, the continent is full of peoples, societies, and civilizations, each with a unique visual special culture. The definition also includes the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.

    * Emphasis on the human figure: The human figure has always been a the primary subject matter for most African art, and this emphasis even influenced certain European traditions. For example in the fifteenth century Portugal traded with the Sapi culture near the Ivory Coast in West Africa, who created elaborate ivory saltcellars that were hybrids of African and European designs, most notably in the addition of the human figure (the human figure typically did not appear in Portuguese saltcellars). The human figure may symbolize the living or the dead, may reference chiefs, dancers, or various trades such as drummers or hunters, or even may be an anthropomorphic representation of a god or have other votive function. Another common theme is the inter-morphosis of human and animal.

Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. 12th century A.D.

    * Visual abstraction: African artworks tend to favor visual abstraction over naturalistic representation. This is because many African artworks generalize stylistic norms. Ancient Egyptian art, also usually thought of as naturalistically depictive, makes use of highly abstracted and regimented visual canons, especially in painting, as well as the use of different colors to represent the qualities and characteristics of an individual being depicted.

    * Emphasis on sculpture: African artists
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Treasures marks the National Museum of African Art's 25th anniversary as a Smithsonian museum. The first in a new exhibition series, Treasuresis an old-fashioned show about African art, reminiscent of the exhibitions that represented avant-garde opinions of the early 20th century. In 1926, Paul Guillaume, Parisian connoisseur and collector, cautioned readers to defer learning about the history and meaning of African art until they had studied African art purely as an art form, because to do otherwise "tends to obscure one's vision of the objects as sculpture."

I chose the familiar--traditional sculpture--to reveal aesthetic variances, to see African art as form, not function. Treasures, therefore, is about visual exploration and aesthetic discovery. Our understanding of African art is prescribed by what we see, and often, what we see is based on works displayed in museums. So, "Treasures" is just that--a sampling that gives us a peek into the realm of African art.

Westerners and Africans alike revere well-made form. Each admires skillful technique and execution, exquisitely rendered forms, pattern, balance, symmetry, surface treatments and a sense of completeness. African artists, however, strive to portray more than that. As metaphor or symbol, their artworks embody the world of ideas and beliefs--confirming their notions about themselves, life and death, the universe and the spiritual realm. Yet, despite our cultural presumptions that separate art from life, often separating aesthetics from meaning, and our ignorance of or indifference to what it means and how it is used, African art astonishes.

An eclectic display of sculptures from East, West, Central, and southern Africa created between the 15th

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What a body?


I have a body good to me, it seems, and that's because I'm me. I count among my properties and pretend to carry him on my full sovereignty. I think therefore unique and independent. But it is an illusion because there is no human society where it is believed that the body is worth by itself. Every body is created, not only by their fathers and mothers. It is not made by one who has it, but by others. No more in New Guinea, the Amazon or Africa than in Western Europe, it is thought as a thing. Instead, it is the particular form of relationship with the otherness that constitutes the person. Depending on the perspective of comparative anthropology adopted here is that other, respectively, the other sex, animal species, the dead or the divine (secularized in the modern age, in the teleology of living). Yes, my body is what reminds me that I find myself in a world populated by example, ancestors, gods, enemies or people of the opposite sex. My body really mine? It is he who I do not belong, I is not alone and that my destiny is to live in society.
Description

224 pages 24 x 26 cm

240 color illustrations

1 map

retail price: 45 €

isbn 2-915133-17-4

Co-published Branly / Flammarion
curator

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Martine Pinard
Ecole du Louvre
Spécialité Arts de l'Afrique
Janvier 2008

" L'Art nègre ? Connais pas  " ! Picasso, 1920

I. Préambule

Au début du XXème siècle et plus précisément vers les années 1905-1907, des peintres commencèrent à collectionner des sculptures d'Afrique et d'Océanie. Qui sont ces collectionneurs de ce qu'on a appelé l' " art nègre " (terme qu'il faudra définir) ; comment, dans quel contexte, ont eu lieu les premières acquisitions ?
Cette première question en induit naturellement une autre : s'il y eut un engouement de prime abord (semble-t-il) " artistique ", qui étaient les premiers collectionneurs-marchands, nécessairement devaient être présents dans le circuit de ces acquisitions ?
Enfin, de manière plus générale, le dossier soulève en toile de fond, la question du changement de regard pour l'art africain et plus généralement l'art des " Autres " sous l'angle de l'impact de cet engouement du début du XX ème siècle. Peut-on esquisser une " trajectoire "
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art is an art museum located on the eastern edge of Central Park, along what is known as Museum Mile in New York City, USA. It has a permanent collection containing more than two million works of art, divided into nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, often referred to simply as "the Met," is one of the world's largest art galleries, and has a much smaller second location in Upper Manhattan, at "The Cloisters," which features medieval art.

Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. A number of notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. It opened on February 20, 1872, and was originally located at 681 Fifth Avenue.

As of 2007, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet.
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