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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

African Paris Gallery L'Oeil et la Main. Art premier primitif africain
Résultat de la recherche Résultat de la recherche : 'rivet'

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by Peter Walsh
 
"MEMORY: Luba Art and the Making of History," one of the largest and most important exhibitions of African art ever to appear in the Boston area, will be on view at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center from February 5 through June 7, 1998. Organized by The Museum for African Art in New York City, this critically acclaimed exhibition of exceptionally beautiful artworks explores for the first time in an American museum exhibition the intricate and fascinating culture of the Luba of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). More than 80 important and beautiful objects are included in the show.
 
Since it opened in New York City in February 1996, MEMORY has received enormous popular and critical praise. The New York Times described it as "everything an exhibition ought to be. Visually riveting and built on a theme as philosophically complex as it is poetic, it has the pace and pull of an unfolding epic... MEMORY... brings to vivid life an art that is both a wonder of formal invention... and a sovereign vehicle for profound ideas."
 
MEMORY will include standing figures, staffs of office, ceremonial weapons, masks, divining tools and amulets as well as fine examples of lukasas, or Luba "memory boards," all of which the Luba used as elaborate visual symbols to record their cultural memories, histories, traditions, and royal lineages. The show and its accompanying catalogue are the culmination of a decade of intense and path-breaking research and study
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Image On the Pale Fox's trail. Dogon

 

GRIAULE  ( Marcel, 1898-1956 )  
 
Ethnologue français. En 1931, soutenu par Paul Rivet, il organisa une expédition de Dakar à Djibouti au cours de laquelle li explora le pays Dogon. En 1941 il devint directeur de l’institut des langues et civilisations orientales  et il obtint en 1942 la chaire  d’ethnographie de la Sorbonne. Sa mission la plus importante fut sans nul doute celle de 1946-1947 au Mali. Ses entretiens avec Ogotemmeli lui révélèrent le rôle déterminant des mythes dans l’organisation  sociale des Dogon et furent  prétexte  à la rédaction de son œuvre majeure : «Dieu d’eau» (1948). Parmi ses autres publications : "Masques dogons" ( 1938), "Renard pale. Ethnologie des Dogon" écrit en collaboration avec G. Dieterlen (1965). 
 
Dieu d'eau, entretiens avec Ogotemmêli ( Fiche de lecture)
http://inton.over-blog.com/article-865229.html