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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'painting'

André Lhote
 
 
 
L'Escale, 1913, Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris.
André Lhote (5 July 1885 – 25 January 1962) was a French sculptor and painter of figure subjects, portraits, landscapes and still life. He was also very active and influential as a teacher and writer on art.
 
 
Lhote was born in Bordeaux and learnt wood carving and sculpture from the age of 12, when his father apprenticed him to a local furniture maker to be trained as a sculptor in wood. He enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux in 1898 and studied decorative sculpture until 1904. Whilst there, he began to paint in his spare time and he left home in 1905, moving into his own studio to devote himself to painting. He was influenced by Gauguin and Cézanne and held his first one-man exhibition at the Galerie Druet in 1910, four years after he had moved to Paris.
After initially working in a Fauvist style, Lhote shifted towards Cubism and joined the Section d'Or group in 1912, exhibiting at the Salon de la Section d'Or. He was alongside some of the fathers of modern art, including Gleizes, Villon, Duchamp, Metzinger, Picabia and La Fresnaye.
The outbreak of the First World War interrupted his work and, after discharge from the army in 1917, he became one of the group of Cubists supported by Léonce Rosenberg. In 1918, he co-founded Nouvelle Revue Française, the art journal to which he contributed articles on art theory until 1940. Lhote taught at the Académie Notre-Dame des Champs from 1918 to 1920 and later taught at other Paris art schools—including his own school, which he founded in Montparnasse in
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The Authenticity of African Sculptures

by Henri Kamer

The issue of authenticity of African art has been central to collectors for decades.  Henri Kamer, who was president of the International Arts Experts Association at the time, published an outstanding account of the state of the matter in Artes d'Afrique Noire, No. 12 (1974).  The text  that follows is extracted from an English translation of that article, and has been edited further.  The original includes a number of illustrations.  They are not included here because I believe the text suffices without them. 

The original version, including the illustrations, in French and with the English translation, is 

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African Art on the Internet
 
 
 
15th Triennial Symposium on African Art, Arts Council of the African Studies Association, 2011, Wednesday, March 23 - Saturday, March 26, 2011, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
http://www.acasaonline.org/conf_next.htm
Addis Art - Ethiopian Art and Artists Page
Contemporary Ethiopian art and artists - paintings, sculptures and digital art work by students and professionals from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University instructor, Getahun Assefa's paintings, drawings, sculpture, digital art. Also work by his brother, Tesfaye Assefa. Based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. [KF] http://www.addisart.com/
Addis Art - Nouveau Art from Ethiopia
Artists include Shiferaw Girma and Lulseged Retta. Photographs of each artist's work, a biography, and video. Founded by Mesai Haileleul. [KF] http://www.addis-art.com/
Adire African Textiles - Duncan Clarke
History, background, and photographs of adire, adinkra, kente, bogolan, Yoruba aso-oke, akwete, ewe, kuba, and nupe textiles. The symbolism of images is often provided. One can purchase textiles as well. Clarke's Ph.D. dissertation (School of Oriental and African Studies) is on Yoruba men's weaving. See also the Adire African Textiles blog. Based in London. http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/
Afewerk Tekle
"Ethiopia’s leading artist." Biography, his paintings, sculptures, mosaics, murals, art in the artist's home. Afewerk created the stained-glass windows at the entrance of Africa Hall, headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. "In 1964, he became the first winner of the Haile Selassie I prize for Fine Arts." "In 2000, he was one of the few chosen World Laureates by the council of the ABI on the occasion of the 27th
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Image AFRICA: The Art of a Continent
PHILLIPS  Tom
 
AFRICA: The Art of a Continent
 
Détails sur le produit:
 
Broché: 620 pages - Editeur: Prestel; Édition: illustrated edition (30 décembre 1999) 
Collection: African, Asian & Oceanic Art - Langue: Anglais 
(ISBN: 3791320041 / 3-7913-2004-1)
PHILLIPS  Tom  -  AFRICA: The Art of a Continent
Présentation de l'éditeur
 
 
 
 
 
Descriptions du produit:
 
 
Présentation de l'éditeur
 
 
From Library Journal
Associated with an exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum, this book provides a survey of 100 visually spectacular objects from Africa. As befits current thinking, the catalog (and exhibition) surveys the entire continent, including ancient Egypt and Nubia and north and northwestern Africa as well as the sub-Saharan region. Each object is reproduced in color and accompanied by extensive catalog entries written by over 60 expert contributors. The catalog section is preceded by five essays contributed by major scholars in the field. The essays discuss the nature of African art and its appreciation. Gates's article on the ambivalence displayed by 20th-century Western appreciation and Suzanne Blier's essay on the myths and misconceptions surrounding African art are especially valuable contributions. Highly recommended for any library with an interest in African art.?Eugene C. Burt, Art Inst. of Seattle Lib.
 
Book Description
As the birthplace of the human race, Africa possesses a cultural history of
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Image Mbuti Design: Paintings by Pygmy Women of the Ituri Forest
MEURANT Georges, THOMPSON Robert Farris
Mbuti Design: Paintings by Pygmy Women of the Ituri Forest
 
Détails sur le produit:
Relié: 224 pages - Editeur: Thames & Hudson Inc - 1996 - Langue: Anglais 
ISBN-10: 0500974306 - ISBN-13: 978-0500974308
Descriptions du produit:
Thames & Hudson Inc, 1996. Hardcover. 300 x 245 mm. Brand New Book with Free Worldwide Delivery. The Mbuti people, who live in the Ituri rainforest of northeastern Zaire, are one of the few remaining hunter-gatherer cultures in the world. Since 3500 BC they have been famed for their rich arts of music and dancing, but until recently the barkcloth drawings and paintings originally made by the women as loincloths for ceremonies and dances have been virtually unknown in the west. The qualities of these drawings and their reflection of the Mbuti people's way of life, are explored and illustrated in this volume. The drawings are closely analyzed, examined both thematically and aesthetically, and the wider influence of African forager art forms on contemporary world art is
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Image NIGERIA IN COSTUME
DANFORD John - W.L. Stewart
NIGERIA IN COSTUME
 
Descrizione: The Shell Company of Nigeria Limited, 1960. Hardcover. John Danford (illustratore). First Edition. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall. Color painting illustrated. 103p. Fine copy in the original blue cloth. Publisher's deluxe full blue morocco stamped in gilt, minor rubbing of front hinge. Langue: Anglais. John Danford OBE was an artist working for the British Council in Nigeria; the Danford Collection of African Arts and Crafts is a nationally important collection at the University of Birmingham. These 48 full page colour reproductions of his paintings show the costumes, uniforms and ceremonial dress of the diverse peoples of Nigeria; the text describes the significance of the details. With a foreword by the Prime Minister of the Federation of Nigeria Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa. Preface by Mr. W L Stewart general manager of the Shell Company of Nigeria Limited with a blindstamp signature. Illustrations include: Benin woman chief in ceremonial dress, Festival dress for the Ekong dance Ibibio, Sir Ademola II Alake of Abeokuta, Base drummer, Ilorin local Administration police band, Mother and child Cameroons, Yoruba girl, Ilorin weaver and more. Unpaginated, navy cloth boards with bright gilt lettering on front board and spine, bright red endpapers. Boards slightly scuffed with mild edgewear; interior clean and crisp with no
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THE NEW CONGO COLLECTION

During the summer of 1912 the Museum acquired by purchase a collection of about two thousand 
specimens consisting of weapons, utensils, ornaments, clothing and images from a number of African 
tribes living in the Congo basin.  This collection was, for the most part, obtained from the natives by the 
well-known German traveler, Frobenius.    

in a way which served at least to show what a variety of artistic activities and  what a rich  culture  the in 
a way which served at least to show what a variety of artistic activities and  what a rich  culture  the 
native Congo peoples possess.     
native Congo peoples possess.     


Visitors  had  an  opportunity   of   admiring the wonderful carved wooden boxes and cups,
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Musées

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"Art plays an essential role in the lives of the African people and their communities. It serves a much more vital purpose than merely to beautify the human environment, as art is usually employed in contemporary Western societies.
The beauty of African art is simply an element of its function, for these objects would not be effective if they were not aesthetically pleasing. Its beauty and its content thus combine to make art the vehicle that ensures the survival of traditions, protects the community and the individual, and tells much of the person or persons who use it."
 
Tribal Art is rapidly growing in popularity. An even broader audience has been able to enjoy ‘Tribal Art’ thanks to major exhibitions in recent years in London, Paris, Berlin, Munich and Düsseldorf. 
   At the start of the 20th century, however, Tribal Art was already arousing great excitement among artists and art collectors. At a time when “Negro Art” was still looked upon as the innocent product of primitive peoples, cubists such as Picasso, Braque or Gris were already drawing inspiration from the strikingly new qualities of form; expressionists such as Kirchner, Nolde or Schmidt-Rottluff were captivated by the elementary power of this native art and Gauguin was painting scenes from his travels to countries of the South Pacific. Non-European art greatly influenced the work of these great artists as it continues to influence modern art of the present day. 
   Over the course of the decades, great art lovers such as von der Heydt (Rietberg Museum, Zurich) or Mueller (Barbier-Mueller Museum, Geneva) have established significant art collections, which alongside the “colonial legacy” provide the mainstay of the museums’ inventories all over the world. Today it is artists and art enthusiasts such as Baselitz, Arman or Fritz
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Relations publiques et presse

XXV Biennale des Antiquaires - Contact des expositions

- Didier Aaron & Cie

(Stand S5)

118, rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré

75008 Paris – FRANCE

Tél. : +33 (0)1 47 42 47 34

contact@didieraaron-cie.com - www.didieraaron.com

32 East 67th Street

NY 10021 New York – USA

Tél. : +1 212 988 52 48 - info@didieraaron.com

Clifford House

15 Clifford Street

W1S4JY Londres – ROYAUME-UNI

Tél. : +44 20 7534 9100- contact@didieraaronltd.com

Contact : Hervé AARON

Spécialité Biennale : Mobilier et objets d’Art des 17e

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Cabinet of curiosities
 
"Musei Wormiani Historia", the frontispiece from the Museum Wormianum depicting Ole Worm's cabinet of curiosities.A Cabinet of curiosities was an encyclopedic collection in Renaissance Europe of types of objects whose categorical boundaries were yet to be defined. Modern terminology would categorize the objects included as belonging to natural history (sometimes faked), geology, ethnography, archaeology, religious or historical relics, works of art (including cabinet paintings) and antiquities. "The Kunstkammer was regarded as a microcosm or theater of the world, and a memory theater. The Kunstkammer conveyed symbolically the patron's control of the world through its indoor, microscopic reproduction." Of Charles I of England's collection, Peter Thomas has succinctly stated, "The Kunstkabinett itself was a form of propaganda"[2] Besides the most famous, best documented cabinets of rulers and aristocrats, members of the merchant class and early practitioners of science in Europe, formed collections that were precursors to museums. They were also known by various names such as Cabinet of Wonder, and in German Kunstkammer or Wunderkammer (wonder-room).

 History
The term cabinet originally described a room rather than a piece of furniture. The classic style of cabinet of curiosities emerged in the sixteenth century, although more rudimentary collections had existed earlier. The Kunstkammer of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor (ruled 1576-1612), housed in the Hradschin at Prague was unrivalled north of the Alps; it provided a solace and retreat for contemplation that also served to demonstrate his imperial magnificence and power in symbolic arrangement of their display, ceremoniously presented to visiting diplomats and magnates. Rudolf's uncle, Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria also had a collection, with a special emphasis on paintings of people with interesting deformities, which remains

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Image Coiffures africaines

Exhibition "African Hairstyles"

After the monographic exhibitions devoted to ethnic Mumuye and Bambara, the gallery's eye and the hand begins 2010 with an exhibition on the theme of the often overlooked African hairstyle. Often overlooked as belonging to the sphere of the arts "popular", hair is however of particular importance in Africa, both aesthetically and symbolically.

The hairstyle can both grow its appearance but also to affirm their identity or social status. Some hairstyles are immediately identifiable, such as hairstyling splayed Mangbetu of the Democratic Republic of Congo or the hairstyles solidified ocher Namibia. Others refer to a hierarchical system more complex. Ancient art, hair is also found in modern African art production, through paintings advertising kiosks hairdressers or barbers, or in African-American fashion. Both ornaments and symbols of identity, the hairstyles worn by different ethnic groups are reflected in their art. Although they represent gods or ancestors, masks and statues are the hairstyles of the living.

In Africa the hairstyle is still practiced by family members or trusted friends. In addition to the social aspects of the event, the hair, placed in the hands of enemies, could become an ingredient in the production of dangerous charms or "medicines" that could hurt their owners. Mostly it is women cap the women and men that cap men.

As scarification, hairstyles to identify gender, ethnicity, stage reached by the person in the cycle of life, status and personal taste. Scholars,

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STRENGTH AND MEASUREMENT

The discovery of "primitive art": an art of strength
Shapes and shape functions
Deities and ancestors
The living wood

Force and Measurement

Develop an aesthetic of black Africa is seen as a risky business in many ways. Is it legitimate to isolate these objects, that today we call art, the general framework of their relations and their cultural constraints? Can we submit to a test that has never existed in the minds of their creators? And can we finally see in this art - if we 'take on this term - a uniform phenomenon, despite the wide variety of both regional and local styles we offer this huge continent, following lengthy Historical developments often poorly understood? Finally, remember that this approach excludes large regions, including Africa white, that is to say the Mediterranean area with its ancient history, the eastern and southern Africa whose pastoral peoples have given rise to cultures almost without images, and finally these hunting societies, which, even in our time have not passed the stage of evolution of prehistoric rock paintings which are the main evidence of an artistic production that appears at various points the continent. Similarly, we must exclude from our contribution to the aesthetics of black African art the old feudal societies, including Benin. Our discussion is therefore limited to large areas farmers, the true cradle of

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Work of art

A work of art, artwork, work or art object is a creation, such as an art object, design, architectural piece, musical work, literary composition, performance, film, conceptual art piece, or even computer program that is made and or valued primarily for an "artistic" rather than practical function. This article is concerned with the concept in the visual arts rather than music or literature, although similar issues arise in those fields.

Traditional media for visual works of art include: calligraphy, photography, carvings, gardens, ceramics, painting, prints, sculpture, drawings, photography or buildings. Since modernism, the field of fine art has expanded to include film, performance art, conceptual art, and video art.

What is perceived as a work of art differs between cultures and eras and by the meaning of the term "art" itself. From the Renaissance until the twentieth century, and to some extent still, Western art critics and the general western public tended not to define applied art or decorative art as works of art, or at least to accord them lower status than works, like paintings, with no practical use, according to the hierarchy of genres. Other cultures, for example Chinese and Islamic art have not made this distinction so strongly.

The related terms artwork and art object, used especially in American English, came into use in the 20th century, especially to describe modern and post-modern art, especially in works without significant skill or craft in creating the physical object. Some contemporary
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“Africa Remix” featured the work of over 100 African artists in a 2,200-sq.m exhibition space. With paintings by Chéri Samba, installations by Barthélémy Toguo, drawings by Frédéric Bruly Bouabré and photographs by Guy Tillim, “Africa Remix” revealed the varied facets of Africa’s contemporary arts scene.

The exhibition examined contemporary African art not only from an aesthetic angle but also from historical, political and ideological perspectives.

- Total pledges support for African art with the ”Africa Remix” exhibition in Paris -

So near, and yet so far: Africa is an enigma that continues to exert a strange fascination for many. “Africa Remix” was an invitation to reflect on what Africa really means – to explore and rediscover it by straying from the beaten path of commonplace ideas and platitudes. As Total has a strong presence in Africa, we are all too aware of the difficulties affecting the continent, but we’re also committed to bringing African culture the recognition it deserves.

Africa Remix

Under the artistic direction of Simon Njami (photo), an international team of curators (see dates and facts as well as the photo) has assembled this overview of the artistic production in Africa and the African diaspora. 88 artists show works from the last 10 years, among them several specially
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African art

African art constitutes one of the most diverse legacies on earth. Though many casual observers tend to generalize "traditional" African art, the continent is full of peoples, societies, and civilizations, each with a unique visual special culture. The definition also includes the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.

    * Emphasis on the human figure: The human figure has always been a the primary subject matter for most African art, and this emphasis even influenced certain European traditions. For example in the fifteenth century Portugal traded with the Sapi culture near the Ivory Coast in West Africa, who created elaborate ivory saltcellars that were hybrids of African and European designs, most notably in the addition of the human figure (the human figure typically did not appear in Portuguese saltcellars). The human figure may symbolize the living or the dead, may reference chiefs, dancers, or various trades such as drummers or hunters, or even may be an anthropomorphic representation of a god or have other votive function. Another common theme is the inter-morphosis of human and animal.

Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. 12th century A.D.

    * Visual abstraction: African artworks tend to favor visual abstraction over naturalistic representation. This is because many African artworks generalize stylistic norms. Ancient Egyptian art, also usually thought of as naturalistically depictive, makes use of highly abstracted and regimented visual canons, especially in painting, as well as the use of different colors to represent the qualities and characteristics of an individual being depicted.

    * Emphasis on sculpture: African artists
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Masks

The viewing of masks is often restricted to certain peoples or places, even when used in performance, or masquerade. African masks manifest spirits of ancestors or nature as well as characters that are spiritual and social forces. During a masquerade, which is performed during ceremonial occasions such as agricultural, initiation, leadership and funerary rites, the mask becomes the otherworld being. When collected by Western cultures, masks are often displayed without their costume ensemble and lack the words, music and movement, or dance, that are integral to the context of African masquerades. Visually, masks are often a combination of human and animal traits. They can be made of wood, natural or man-made fibers, cloth and animal skin. Masks are usually worn with costumes and can, to some extent, be categorized by form, which includes face masks, crest masks, cap masks, helmet masks, shoulder masks, and fiber and body masks. Maskettes, which are shaped like masks, are smaller and are not worn on or over the face. They may be worn on an individual’s arm or hip or hung on a fence or other structure near the performance area.

Sculpture

The cultures of Africa have created a world-renowned tradition of three-dimensional and relief sculpture. Everyday and ceremonial works of great delicacy and surface detail are fashioned by artists using carving, modeling, smithing and casting techniques. Masks, figures, musical instruments, containers, furniture, tools and equipment are all part of the sculptor’s repertoire. The human figure is perhaps the most prominent sculptural form in Africa, as it has been for millennia. Male and female images in wood, ivory, bone, stone, earth, fired clay, iron and copper alloy embody cultural values, depict the ideal and represent spirits, ancestors and deities. Used in a broad range of contexts--initiation, healing, divination,
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