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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
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Result of the research Result of the research : 'meet'

Gèlèdè Mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
Gèlèdè Mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
€ 12,000.00
Gelede mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
Gelede mask, Yoruba, Nigeria
€ 22,000.00

Image Where Gods and Mortals Meet: Continuity and Renewal in Urhobo Art
FOSS Perkins
Where Gods and Mortals Meet: Continuity and Renewal in Urhobo Art
Détails sur le produit: - Relié: 152 pages - Editeur: Snoeck-Ducaji & Zoon; Édition: illustrated edition (10 mai 2004) - Langue: Anglais - ISBN-10: 9053495061 - ISBN-13: 978-9053495063
Book Description: The Urhobo peoples occupy the western fringe of the Niger River delta in southern Nigeria, an area rich with oil reserves. Since the 1970s, the petroleum industry has brought worldwide wealth and attention to Nigeria, but tragically has also detracted from broad-based economic progress as flow stations, flare-offs, drilling platforms and pipelines have proliferated. As rural economies suffered an inevitable decline, the custom of maintaining traditional Urhobo art has experienced a parallel atrophy. The resultant decline in Urhobo culture has prompted a response among many Urhobo who want to celebrate and preserve their traditions for future generations. The Museum for African Art in New York makes a major contribution to this effort through the presentation of Where Gods and Mortals meet, the first exhibition to showcase Urhobo arts. The exhibition introduces never-before-seen Urhobo art and footage of cultural performances, from yesterday and today. This accompanying catalogue includes approximately 80 works of art: traditional art from the historical period 1850 to 1975, including monumental wood figures, metal and clay sculpture, and masks and costumes with accompanying poetry and song; a small selection of contemporary work by Bruce Onobrakpeya, an Urhobo by birth and one of Africa's foremost artists; plus photos and video footage of extraordinary multimedia masquerades. Edited by Perkins Foss.Essays by John Picton, Perkins Foss, Michael Y. Nabofa, G.G. Darah, Tanure Ojaide, and Bruce Onobrakpeya. Foreword by Peter Ekeh. Hardcover, 9 x 12 in. / 152 pgs / 141 color and 7
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Full text, digitalised by Lies Strijker and presented by the .Centre Aequatoria
Notes on the digitalisation and presentation


[Cover]

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[2]
IMPRIMI POTEST
Kanzenze, 12-2-1952
P. Simeon, o.m.f.
Sup. Reg.

IMPRIMATUR
Luabo-Kamina, 30-5-1952
+VICTOR PETRUS KEUPPENS
Vic. Ap. de Lulua


[3]

BANTU PHILOSOPHY
by
The Revd. Father PLACIDE TEMPELS

(Translated into English from "La Philosophie Bantoue" the French Version by Dr. A. Rubbens of Fr. Tempels' original work. The Revd. Colin King, M.A. Translator.)

With a Foreword to the English Edition by Dr Margaret Read, C.B.E.Ph. D.,M.A., formerly Professor of Education and Head of the Department Of Education in Tropical Areas, The

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Tribal Art - Jean-Baptiste BacquaSee the continuation... ]

Walker Evans

Walker Evans
Il est né le 3 novembre 1903, à Saint-Louis, Missouri. Il étudie au Williams College en 1922-1923 et à la Sorbonne en 1926. Evans débute la photographie en 1930. Il obtient une bourse de la Fondation John-Simon-Guggenheim en 1940, 1941 et 1959. Il entre au magazine Time en 1945 et à Fortune en 1965. Cette même année, il devient professeur de photographie à l'école d'art de l'Université Yale. Il est mort le 10 avril 1975, à New Haven, Connecticut.
On connaît notamment son travail sur la Grande dépression, participant au programme de la Farm Security Administration. Les images de métayers dans l'Alabama, au même titre que celles de Dorothea Lange, comptent parmi les icônes du monde moderne.
On remarque dans son travail les regards des sujets fixant l'objectif de Walker Evans : ici pas de doute le sujet se sait photographié, pour autant il ne se compose pas un visage de circonstance orné d'un sourire obligatoire. Ici la photographie ne se contente pas de montrer, elle interroge le spectateur, l'américain des années 1930 : si le sujet se laisse photographier dans cette posture, c'est que son regard a quelque chose à nous dire. Ce n'est peut-être plus nous qui le regardons mais lui qui nous accuse.
Cette franchise du photographe préserve une dignité humaine mise à mal par la misère qui se laisse voir dans les vêtements en loques.
Cet aspect de ses photos est
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Image Songye people

Linguistically, the Songye form part of the Luba, world, itself part of the Bantu group. Indeed there is a century old inter relation between the Songye and Luba, and they therefore share many cultural traits. Some art forms are part of this, shared heritage, according to the oral tradition the founding chieftains of the first luba kingdom, were of songye origins, and it is the Songye who introduced the idea of social stratification to the Luba and consequently the first luba chieftains are said to be of Songye Ancestry.

 

ENVIRONMENT

The Songye used to live in a forest environment till the end of the first half of the second millennium. Slowly their habitat became more savannah-like. We can still find traces of this former forest habitat in some of the art they produce. For example the costume worn with the Kifwebe mask must be entirely made from products originating in the forest from such as bark, pelts fibers etc. Today the Songye mainly live in the savannah but pockets of forest remain in their territory.

The Songye occupy a very large area in the north of the southeastern quadrant of the republic democratic of Congo.

Due to the vastness of the songye territory, it is obvious that regional stylistic, iconic and typological, exist in the ritual art produced. Some of these are the result of cross influences with their immediate neighbors.

 

NEIGHBORS

To the North of the Songye territory, live the Sungu, Tetela, the western Kusu. In the northwest we will find a few luba chiefdoms. To the west the Luntu, Luba – kassaï Kete and Binji peoples resides; one can even find pockets of Chokwe people in the southwest of Songye territory. To the south of the Songye we find a variety of luba speacking, polities, the same is true, for eastern frontier where in addition to the eastern kusu, we find Luba, Hemba, Kunda, Lumbu and Buyu people. Judging from their

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Image baga

45000 Baga, live along the coast of Guinea Bissau in villages divided into two and four districts, themselves subdivided into 5 and 6 clans. According to tradition each village is headed by the oldest members of each clan were meeting in secret. Nowadays this system has been replaced by a mayor elected from each village.

The Baga worship a single god called Kanu assisted by a male spirit, Somtup, and a female spirit-A bowl. A spirit often represented by a snake, watch over the lower ranks of society to-Lom responsible for initiation rites.

The first sculptures Baga appeared in the West during the 50s, the impact of Islamization, and the abandonment of traditional rites and beliefs, the Western traders allowed to export the masks and headdresses Baga statues. Nowadays Baga trying to restore their culture with the help of their elders, they recreate ceremonies and celebrations that punctuated their traditional life.

Masks:

The mask is the most famous Baga Nimba called, is a mask shoulder supported by four pillars, it has large breasts, a large head with semi-circular ears, a chin and a pointy nose. He appeared at weddings, births, ceremonies related to crops and more generally in the ceremonies connected with joyful events. Two styles of Nimba masks have been identified, the first best known in the West has a concave face, whereas the second has a convex face.

The crest known as: Ziringen Wonde, was worn by dancers during ceremonies marking the end of the periods of initiation of girls,

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Image yaka

Arts of Africa first Black Arts Spring 1981 No. 77
When we examine the significance of an African mask, we do not seek to know what the "message" it provides, by virtue of some essential notion of disguise and by his presence, but rather what kind of continuum it belongs. The masks are at the confluence of pictorial traditions, oral and functional none appears (under secular unable to recognize the subjects and even less discernible. The understanding of pictorial code used requires not only a review but a review of developed components as needed through the original context. Let us offer an example of the image with respect to the buffalo in the region of Zaire Kwango-Kwilu South West (1).
Synceros caffer, the largest of African cattle is a massive animal, black, cropped hair, measuring 1.50 m at the shoulder and weighing nearly a ton (900 kg.) (Fig. 1). Its heavy horns have a spacing of one meter, are curved downward and inward and form large lumps to their bases. This animal, originally occupied the central, eastern and southern Africa, frequenting the open plains, open woods and river beds and marshes bordered by reeds. Commonly preview herds of a dozen to a hundred heads, he used to graze and graze the early morning and again at dusk, seeking shade during the hottest hours but sometimes moving at night . Females do not carry a calf for about eleven months.

Considered peaceful, was injured when he can become, for hunters, the most dangerous animal of any big game on the continent (Fig. 2). He is known for his

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Image Coiffures africaines

Exhibition "African Hairstyles"

After the monographic exhibitions devoted to ethnic Mumuye and Bambara, the gallery's eye and the hand begins 2010 with an exhibition on the theme of the often overlooked African hairstyle. Often overlooked as belonging to the sphere of the arts "popular", hair is however of particular importance in Africa, both aesthetically and symbolically.

The hairstyle can both grow its appearance but also to affirm their identity or social status. Some hairstyles are immediately identifiable, such as hairstyling splayed Mangbetu of the Democratic Republic of Congo or the hairstyles solidified ocher Namibia. Others refer to a hierarchical system more complex. Ancient art, hair is also found in modern African art production, through paintings advertising kiosks hairdressers or barbers, or in African-American fashion. Both ornaments and symbols of identity, the hairstyles worn by different ethnic groups are reflected in their art. Although they represent gods or ancestors, masks and statues are the hairstyles of the living.

In Africa the hairstyle is still practiced by family members or trusted friends. In addition to the social aspects of the event, the hair, placed in the hands of enemies, could become an ingredient in the production of dangerous charms or "medicines" that could hurt their owners. Mostly it is women cap the women and men that cap men.

As scarification, hairstyles to identify gender, ethnicity, stage reached by the person in the cycle of life, status and personal taste. Scholars,

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STRENGTH AND MEASUREMENT

The discovery of "primitive art": an art of strength
Shapes and shape functions
Deities and ancestors
The living wood

Force and Measurement

Develop an aesthetic of black Africa is seen as a risky business in many ways. Is it legitimate to isolate these objects, that today we call art, the general framework of their relations and their cultural constraints? Can we submit to a test that has never existed in the minds of their creators? And can we finally see in this art - if we 'take on this term - a uniform phenomenon, despite the wide variety of both regional and local styles we offer this huge continent, following lengthy Historical developments often poorly understood? Finally, remember that this approach excludes large regions, including Africa white, that is to say the Mediterranean area with its ancient history, the eastern and southern Africa whose pastoral peoples have given rise to cultures almost without images, and finally these hunting societies, which, even in our time have not passed the stage of evolution of prehistoric rock paintings which are the main evidence of an artistic production that appears at various points the continent. Similarly, we must exclude from our contribution to the aesthetics of black African art the old feudal societies, including Benin. Our discussion is therefore limited to large areas farmers, the true cradle of

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AFRICAN SCULPTURE

Introduction
Context of African sculpture
Places of traditional African sculpture
Canons of African sculpture
Techniques and creative
Aesthetic
Role of African sculpture in the middle
Universal impact of African sculpture
Bibliographic


Introduction

Never has been written about as much ink as traditional African sculpture. Ever, despite all attempts, the man has managed to evacuate his mental field, much less its history, that is to say of his encounter with the other. It has been a cornerstone to measure the "civilization" of the black man and his ability to create capacity variously appreciated throughout history until early this century, cubism helping, the unanimously begins to make the exceptional nature of African sculpture that was always confused with African art which it is a party, probably the most important, if one were to judge solely by the number Parts created that we have reached.

Context of African sculpture

We can talk about African sculpture in isolation from the rest of the arts of Africa south of Sahara. Every word in this area is responsible not only meaningless but history, and if we chose the term "African art" is to fully assume all we have inherited from the past in

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Study on the sacred


Introduction
The sacred: the real paradigm
The flaw in the anthropological research of the sacred
The position of the African researcher
The inconsistency of the true-false paradigm of the irrational
The crucial importance of the event
Ancestor worship: in search of a definition
The premier event: the phenomenon agrarian
Biological Bases
The neurobiological underpinnings
Astronomical Foundations
Conclusion
Bibliography


Introduction


Welcome to this site dedicated to refuting the paradigm of the irrational use explicit about the facts of sacred archaic or traditional societies, and especially African societies.

As a member of these societies, the systematic use of the irrational as ultimate explanation of these facts is offensive and we might seem a lack of rigor in research.

In the approach to ethnology-anthropology there is always explicitly or implicitly begging the question that traditional societies through their culture could not produce something intellectually coherent. This profession of faith explains the systematic irrationality as an explanation of the ultimate sacred facts.

By irrational, what is heard is indeed something wrong, incoherent, that defies logic, in

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Treasures marks the National Museum of African Art's 25th anniversary as a Smithsonian museum. The first in a new exhibition series, Treasuresis an old-fashioned show about African art, reminiscent of the exhibitions that represented avant-garde opinions of the early 20th century. In 1926, Paul Guillaume, Parisian connoisseur and collector, cautioned readers to defer learning about the history and meaning of African art until they had studied African art purely as an art form, because to do otherwise "tends to obscure one's vision of the objects as sculpture."

I chose the familiar--traditional sculpture--to reveal aesthetic variances, to see African art as form, not function. Treasures, therefore, is about visual exploration and aesthetic discovery. Our understanding of African art is prescribed by what we see, and often, what we see is based on works displayed in museums. So, "Treasures" is just that--a sampling that gives us a peek into the realm of African art.

Westerners and Africans alike revere well-made form. Each admires skillful technique and execution, exquisitely rendered forms, pattern, balance, symmetry, surface treatments and a sense of completeness. African artists, however, strive to portray more than that. As metaphor or symbol, their artworks embody the world of ideas and beliefs--confirming their notions about themselves, life and death, the universe and the spiritual realm. Yet, despite our cultural presumptions that separate art from life, often separating aesthetics from meaning, and our ignorance of or indifference to what it means and how it is used, African art astonishes.

An eclectic display of sculptures from East, West, Central, and southern Africa created between the 15th

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The Age of Jazz

exhibition poster's century jazz


Garden Gallery

exhibition ticket or ticket matched

March 17 to June 28, 2009


Commissioner Daniel Soutif

Jazz, along with film and rock, one of the major artistic events of the twentieth century. This hybrid music marked the global culture of its sounds and rhythms.

The exhibition, designed by the philosopher and art critic Daniel Soutif, presented in chronological relations between jazz and graphic arts throughout the twentieth century.

From painting to photography, from cinema to literature, not to mention the graphic or comic book, the exhibition shows more particularly the development of jazz in Europe and France in the 30 and 40.


e route of exposure

Life, 1 July 1926 (FG Cooper, 1926) © Collection Philippe Baudoin
Life, 1 July 1926 (FG Cooper, 1926) © Collection Philippe Baudoin

The exhibition is divided into ten chronological sections connected by a "timeline", vertical window through which the exhibition will bring together works, objects and documents, scores illustrated posters, records and folders, pictures ... entrusted to evoke directly the main events in the history of jazz.

This structured timeline by year is the common thread of

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Metisse world
edited by Serge Gruzinski


To Mix ot not to mix?

It is to dwell on the notion of miscegenation, topical if any, by confronting the reader to a series of oppositions common, calling into question the strong taste of the West for dualism: Classical / ethnic, antique / classic, original / first, folk / colonial, exotic / Typical ...

Open exhibition and publication on issues related to the idea of mixing that lead almost without transition, to an exploration of memory. These elements suggest to think logically about how to be "manufactured" objects mixed with it is often difficult to define the contours. They could be defined as the expression of a human creation that arose at the confluence of the Worlds and European companies in Asia, Africa and America. They are at the heart of a story that is played worldwide since the fifteenth century to the present.

After several steps that will reveal many little-known works, the course ends with an imaginary encounter with the contemporary Métis, particularly through Hollywood and Asian cinema.
Description

184 pages 24 x 26 cm

About 150 illustrations

Retail price: 45 €

Hardback

Isbn 978-2-7427-7344-2/978-2-915133-81-3

Co-published Branly / Actes Sud
curator

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Tangle of ropes, accumulation of disparate elements, small heaps unspeakable, are the objects of divination in Africa in this book. These figures of the formless, sometimes perceived as loathsome and strange, are much more familiar we suppose at first, and do not speak of anything but life and countless son's existence, which continue to establish and discard. It is not that of any tribute to Africa and mysterious fetish, but to honor human creativity and variety of forms it knows borrow.

Exposure. Musée du Quai Branly (2009) Recipes of the Gods: the fetish aesthetic Actes Sud € 19.90
Group under the leadership of Jacques Kerchache African Art & Citadels Mazenod € 199.00
Faik-Nzuji, Clementine M. African Arts: signs and symbols boeck From € 42.00
Collective Imprints of Africa: African Art, Modern Art Workshop € 9.91
Basson, Mbog Aesthetics of African Art: The Symbolic and complexity Harmattan € 21.00
Diagne, Souleymane Bachir Leopold Sedar Senghor, African art as philosophy: an essay Riveneuve € 15.00
Exposure. Afrikamuseum (2007-2008) Ubangi, art and culture in the heart of South Africa Acts € 99.95
Alain Lecomte art, magic and medicine in Black Africa Gallery Alain Lecomte € 35.00
Exposure. Dapper Foundation (2007-2008) Musée Dapper Pet € 45.00
Exposure.

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A little history ...

In 1981, during the opening of the gallery Amber, that arises the idea of gathering around the opening five to six colleagues antique arts primary and thus offer the public the first "Open House on non-European art "at the Sablon.

The project is successful, the key to success ... The idea was encrusted to the point of other galleries, Belgian and foreign.

In 1988, a pamphlet modest rally materializes this antique constantly growing, and three years later, the first edition of a catalog reflects the success of this consortium of antique dealers mobilized to the same object: to promote the exceptional richness of the arts which they are the first ambassadors.

Since 1996, antique Brussels even invited into their local foreign colleagues. Today, galleries French, Italian, Spanish, English, Dutch and American joined the event, giving an international dimension.

The Brussels Non European Art Fair has become one of the most important manifestations of non-European art, covering sectors as diverse as African art, Oceanic art, Indonesian art, pre-Columbian art or the Asian art and the art of Australian Aborigines.

Sculptures, masks, fetishes, guns, jewelry, coins, textiles, traditional objects carried by people for their use, wood, metal, gold, silver, bronze, ivory and terra cotta, the exhibits are ritual or domestic alliance shape and ornament.

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Primitive arts in Kaos
Le Journal des Arts - n ° 220 - September 9, 2005

The young Parisian journey Kaos has quickly become the global meeting place among lovers of primitive art. With a fourth edition even richer.
It took only two years at Kaos-Course Worlds in Paris Saint-Germain-des-Prés, home of the primitive arts, to win. Modeled on that of Bruneaf Brussels (Brussels Non European Art Fair), Kaos is an open event bringing together specialist dealers concentrated in one area (ie, exhibiting in their walls or hosted by other galleries). But while Bruneaf is losing momentum in recent years, Kaos is getting stronger. Created in 2002 from an idea by Rik Gadella (among other founder of Paris Photo), the appointment of Parisian art lovers first hosted the first year 21 galleries around the axis of the Rue de Seine, then 40 participants in 2003. The formula took off in 2004 with 51 exhibitors from around the world and has already reached international fame. This latest edition was also shown the excesses of the success of Kaos: merchants had refused leased spaces on the course to enjoy the commercial success generated by the event. Without dwelling on the subject, "not to do their advertising, its management announced a reinforcement of the signage" Kaos "to foreclose any parasites.

Must
This year, 55 galleries will open the festivities on the evening of Sept. 14, in a friendly atmosphere that gives the event a very special charm

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Jacques Chirac

22nd President of the French Republic
5th President of the Fifth Republic
Co-Prince of Andorra
In office
17 May 1995 – 16 May 2007
Prime Minister     Alain Juppé
Lionel Jospin
Jean-Pierre Raffarin
Dominique de Villepin
Preceded by     François Mitterrand
Succeeded by     Nicolas Sarkozy
Mayor of Paris
In office
20 March 1977 – 16 May 1995
Preceded by     Office Created
Succeeded by     Jean Tiberi
159th Prime Minister of France
10th Prime Minister of Fifth Republic
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Mali Empire

The Mali Empire or Manding Empire or Manden Kurufa was a West African civilization of the Mandinka from c. 1230 to c. 1600. The empire was founded by Sundiata Keita and became renowned for the wealth of its rulers, especially Mansa Musa I. The Mali Empire had many profound cultural influences on West Africa allowing the spread of its language, laws and customs along the Niger River. The Mali empire extended over an area larger than western Europe and consisted of numerous vassal kingdoms and provinces.

Manden

1235-1600's. The Mali Empire grew out of an area referred to by its contemporary inhabitants as Manden. Manden, named for its inhabitants the Mandinka (initially Manden’ka with “ka” meaning people of), comprised most of present-day northern Guinea and southern Mali. The empire was originally established as a federation of Mandinka tribes called the Manden Kurufa (literally Manden Federation), but it later became an empire ruling millions of people from nearly every ethnic group in West Africa.

Etymology

The naming origins of the Mali Empire are complex and still debated in scholarly circles around the world. While the meaning of “Mali” is still contested, the process of how it entered the regional lexicon is not. As mentioned earlier, the Mandinka of the Middle Ages referred to their ethnic homeland as “Manden”.
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Image Paul Klee
Paul Klee

Born     18 December 1879
Münchenbuchsee bei Bern, Switzerland
Died     29 June 1940 (aged 60)
Muralto, Switzerland
Nationality     German/Swiss
Training     Academy of Fine Arts, Munich
Works     more than 10,000 paintings, drawings, and etchings, including The Twittering Machine (1922), Fish Magic (1925), Viaducts Break Ranks (1937).

Paul Klee (18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940) was a Swiss painter of German nationality. His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included expressionism, cubism, and surrealism. He was, as well, a student of orientalism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually mastered color theory, and wrote extensively about it. His works reflect his dry humor and his sometimes child-like perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and his musicality. He and his friend, the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the German Bauhaus school of art and architecture.

Early life and training
“     First of all, the art of living; then as my
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