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 GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

GALERIE ART PREMIER AFRICAIN GALERIE ART PRIMITIF AFRICAIN AFRICAN ART GALLERY

Art Gallery the Eye and the Hand
Situation : Welcome » Result of the research
Result of the research Result of the research : 'innovation'

African Art on the Internet
 
 
 
15th Triennial Symposium on African Art, Arts Council of the African Studies Association, 2011, Wednesday, March 23 - Saturday, March 26, 2011, UCLA, Los Angeles, California
http://www.acasaonline.org/conf_next.htm
Addis Art - Ethiopian Art and Artists Page
Contemporary Ethiopian art and artists - paintings, sculptures and digital art work by students and professionals from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. University instructor, Getahun Assefa's paintings, drawings, sculpture, digital art. Also work by his brother, Tesfaye Assefa. Based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. [KF] http://www.addisart.com/
Addis Art - Nouveau Art from Ethiopia
Artists include Shiferaw Girma and Lulseged Retta. Photographs of each artist's work, a biography, and video. Founded by Mesai Haileleul. [KF] http://www.addis-art.com/
Adire African Textiles - Duncan Clarke
History, background, and photographs of adire, adinkra, kente, bogolan, Yoruba aso-oke, akwete, ewe, kuba, and nupe textiles. The symbolism of images is often provided. One can purchase textiles as well. Clarke's Ph.D. dissertation (School of Oriental and African Studies) is on Yoruba men's weaving. See also the Adire African Textiles blog. Based in London. http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/
Afewerk Tekle
"Ethiopia’s leading artist." Biography, his paintings, sculptures, mosaics, murals, art in the artist's home. Afewerk created the stained-glass windows at the entrance of Africa Hall, headquarters of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. "In 1964, he became the first winner of the Haile Selassie I prize for Fine Arts." "In 2000, he was one of the few chosen World Laureates by the council of the ABI on the occasion of the 27th
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Image Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
FARDON Richard and STELZIG Christine
 
Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
 
 
Détails sur le produit:
 
Relié: 160 pages - Editeur: Saffron Books (15 septembre 2005) - Collection: Saffron Afriscopes - Langue: Anglais - ISBN-10: 1872843468 - ISBN-13: 978-1872843469
FARDON Richard and STELZIG Christine: 
Column to Volume: Pt. 1: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary
Descriptions du produit: Descrizione libro
 
 
 
 
 
Descriptions du produit:
 
 
 
Descrizione libro
 
Saffron Books [EAP London], 2005. Hardcover. 1st Edition. "Column to Volume: Formal Innovation in Chamba Statuary" investigates the appearance on world art markets during the 1970s of statues identified as Chamba from West Africa. Sought after for their artful execution, these statues were stylistically unlike anything previously documented from the region. Are they what the art market claimed? Who made them, when, where and why?To answer these questions, Richard Fardon and Christine Stelzig had to combine the findings of ethnographic research in Cameroon and Nigeria with museum and archival research and the testimonies of art dealers and collectors. Profusely illustrated, "Column to Volume" offers a comprehensive account of an important sculptural tradition in West Africa, as well as fascinating insights into the tribal branding, distribution, and copying, of African art works during the 1970s.Identifying formal innovation in what has been described as 'tribal' tradition, not least by tracing the individual sculptor irresponsible for
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Image REGARDS SUR LES DOGON DU MALI
BEDAUX Rogier et VAN DER WAALS Diderik
 
REGARDS SUR LES DOGON DU MALI
 
Détails sur le produit:
 
Rijksmuseum / Snieck, 2004. Couverture rigide. très bel ouvrage sur les Dogon, proposant une vue d'ensemble du patrimoine culturel des Dogon: leur art, leur culture matèrielle, leur architecture et leur histoire. - ISBN 9789053494219
BAY G. Edna
Asen, Ancestors, and Vodun: Tracing Change in African Art
Détails sur le produit: Relié: 188 pages - Editeur: University of Illinois Press (15 avril 2008) - Langue: Anglais 
ISBN-10: 0252032551 - ISBN-13: 978-0252032554
Descrizione libro: Asen, metal sculptures of southern Benin, West Africa, are created to honour the dead and are meant to encourage interaction between visible and spiritual worlds in ancestral rites associated with the belief system known as vodun. Drawing on extensive fieldwork in the former Kingdom of Dahomey, Bay traces more than 150 years of transformations in the manufacture and symbolic meanings of asen against the backdrop of a slave-raiding monarchy, domination by French colonialism, and postcolonial political and social change. Bay expertly reads evidence of the area's turbulent history through analysis of asen motifs as she describes the diverse influences affecting the process of asen production from the point of their probable invention to their current decline in use. Paradoxically, asen represent a sacred African art form, yet are created using European materials and technologies and are embellished with figures drawn from tourist production. Bay's meticulously researched artistic and historical study is a fascinating Présentation de l'éditeur
 
Rijksmuseum voor Volkenkunde, Leyde. Gand: Editions Snoeck,
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L'ART DES BAOULES
par Suzanne VOGEL

Les artistes baoulé de Côte d'Ivoire ont créé des objets d'une esthétique quasiment inégalée dans l'art africain traditionnel, que ce soit par leur raffinement, leur diversité, leur profusion et la somme de travail qu'ils représentent. Les masques et les statuettes des Baoulés, ont suscité l'engouement des Occidentaux dès leur découverte et ils sont considérés comme l'une des réussites les plus achevées de l'art africain, c'est pourquoi ces sculptures occupent toujours une place prépondérante dans toute exposition ou étude consacrée à l'Afrique. Pourtant, aussi importante que soit leur renommée en Occident, il n'a jamais été facile pour quiconque de voir les représentations de cet art sur les lieux mêmes de sa création, dans les villages baoulé. L'art baoulé est loin de se limiter aux masques relativement naturalistes et aux figures humaines taillées dans le bois, il comprend également une grande variété d'ouvrages en ivoire, en bronze et en or : de grands masques-heaumes représentant des animaux agressifs ou des figures simiesques, et divers objets offrant des myriades de motifs sculptés: des portes, des chaises et des tabourets, des tam-tams, des cuillères, des bâtons, des peignes, des éventails, des frondes, des bols et des assiettes, des poids, etc. Il faut également mentionner des poteries, des bijoux et des tissus, ornés de petites figures humaines ou animales. De manière paradoxale, dans l'ethnie baoulé, seul un nombre limité d'individus ont eu le privilège, toujours potentiellement dangereux, de pouvoir regarder une œuvre d'art, dans le passé comme dans le présent. Un simple coup

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L'ART DES BAOULES
par Suzanne VOGEL

Les artistes baoulé de Côte d'Ivoire ont créé des objets d'une esthétique quasiment inégalée dans l'art africain traditionnel, que ce soit par leur raffinement, leur diversité, leur profusion et la somme de travail qu'ils représentent. Les masques et les statuettes des Baoulés, ont suscité l'engouement des Occidentaux dès leur découverte et ils sont considérés comme l'une des réussites les plus achevées de l'art africain, c'est pourquoi ces sculptures occupent toujours une place prépondérante dans toute exposition ou étude consacrée à l'Afrique. Pourtant, aussi importante que soit leur renommée en Occident, il n'a jamais été facile pour quiconque de voir les représentations de cet art sur les lieux mêmes de sa création, dans les villages baoulé.
L'art baoulé est loin de se limiter aux masques relativement naturalistes et aux figures humaines taillées dans le bois, il comprend également une grande variété d'ouvrages en ivoire, en bronze et en or : de grands masques-heaumes représentant des animaux agressifs ou des figures simiesques, et divers objets offrant des myriades de motifs sculptés: des portes, des chaises et des tabourets, des tam-tams, des cuillères, des bâtons, des peignes, des éventails, des frondes, des bols et des assiettes, des poids, etc. Il faut également mentionner des poteries, des bijoux et des tissus, ornés de petites figures humaines ou animales.
De manière paradoxale, dans l'ethnie baoulé, seul un nombre limité d'individus ont eu le privilège, toujours potentiellement dangereux, de pouvoir regarder une

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STRENGTH AND MEASUREMENT

The discovery of "primitive art": an art of strength
Shapes and shape functions
Deities and ancestors
The living wood

Force and Measurement

Develop an aesthetic of black Africa is seen as a risky business in many ways. Is it legitimate to isolate these objects, that today we call art, the general framework of their relations and their cultural constraints? Can we submit to a test that has never existed in the minds of their creators? And can we finally see in this art - if we 'take on this term - a uniform phenomenon, despite the wide variety of both regional and local styles we offer this huge continent, following lengthy Historical developments often poorly understood? Finally, remember that this approach excludes large regions, including Africa white, that is to say the Mediterranean area with its ancient history, the eastern and southern Africa whose pastoral peoples have given rise to cultures almost without images, and finally these hunting societies, which, even in our time have not passed the stage of evolution of prehistoric rock paintings which are the main evidence of an artistic production that appears at various points the continent. Similarly, we must exclude from our contribution to the aesthetics of black African art the old feudal societies, including Benin. Our discussion is therefore limited to large areas farmers, the true cradle of

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THE WAY OF THE AFRICAN RENAISSANCE

Text from the "diplomatic world" in October 1998

In economic terms, Africa figure of poor and marginalized continent. Since the end of the Cold War, it appears as an area that declassified no longer a geopolitical and diplomatic challenge for the major powers. Outside of emergencies that require humanitarian intervention, nobody is really interested in the fate of 700 million men and women who live in this part of the world. "Bankruptcy of development"? "Retard"? Or, rather, strength of African societies, refusing to be trapped neoliberal, and the emergence of alternatives to the Western model of development?


Few studies of the continent really leave room for hope: it keeps repeating that it "Africa sinks" and becomes "a repository of humanity's ills." The image of a "continent wrecked," repeated ad nauseam, seems to summarize all the perceptions of Africa that tend to be synonymous with poverty, corruption and fraud would be the home of violence, conflict and genocide. Images are projected onto Apocalypse "an impoverished Africa in the spiral of conflict." In the late twentieth century, "no continent offers such a spectacle of desolation, war and famine as Africa. (...) Slowly, the place is going to drift. "

The paradigm of "bankruptcy" is the same analytical framework of economic and social

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Culture

Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning "to cultivate")[1] is a term that has different meanings. For example, in 1952, Alfred Kroeber and Clyde Kluckhohn compiled a list of 164 definitions of "culture" in Culture: A Critical Review of Concepts and Definitions. However, the word "culture" is most commonly used in three basic senses:

    * excellence of taste in the fine arts and humanities, also known as high culture
    * an integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for symbolic thought and social learning
    * the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution, organization or group.

When the concept first emerged in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe, it connoted a process of cultivation or improvement, as in agriculture or horticulture. In the nineteenth century, it came to refer first to the betterment or refinement of the individual, especially through education, and then to the fulfillment of national aspirations or ideals. In the mid-nineteenth century, some scientists used the term "culture" to refer to a universal human capacity.

In the twentieth century, "culture" emerged as a concept central to anthropology, encompassing all human phenomena that are not purely results of human genetics.
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African art

African art constitutes one of the most diverse legacies on earth. Though many casual observers tend to generalize "traditional" African art, the continent is full of peoples, societies, and civilizations, each with a unique visual special culture. The definition also includes the art of the African Diasporas, such as the art of African Americans. Despite this diversity, there are some unifying artistic themes when considering the totality of the visual culture from the continent of Africa.

    * Emphasis on the human figure: The human figure has always been a the primary subject matter for most African art, and this emphasis even influenced certain European traditions. For example in the fifteenth century Portugal traded with the Sapi culture near the Ivory Coast in West Africa, who created elaborate ivory saltcellars that were hybrids of African and European designs, most notably in the addition of the human figure (the human figure typically did not appear in Portuguese saltcellars). The human figure may symbolize the living or the dead, may reference chiefs, dancers, or various trades such as drummers or hunters, or even may be an anthropomorphic representation of a god or have other votive function. Another common theme is the inter-morphosis of human and animal.

Yoruba bronze head sculpture, Ife, Nigeria c. 12th century A.D.

    * Visual abstraction: African artworks tend to favor visual abstraction over naturalistic representation. This is because many African artworks generalize stylistic norms. Ancient Egyptian art, also usually thought of as naturalistically depictive, makes use of highly abstracted and regimented visual canons, especially in painting, as well as the use of different colors to represent the qualities and characteristics of an individual being depicted.

    * Emphasis on sculpture: African artists
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Throughout the centuries, African artists have created artworks in various media that underscore the dynamic quality of Africa's visual traditions. The categories presented here represent the breadth of the collection and are intended as a guide.

The NMAfA collection includes tradition-based and contemporary works of art. Both address important issues of identity, history and aesthetics, demonstrate dynamism and reflect change as African artists respond to new ideas, materials and sources of inspiration.

Tradition-based arts help shape and reflect established formal, functional and aesthetic canons. These artworks, which are used in everyday and ceremonial settings, address individual and community needs and serve social, religious and political ends. Humans and animals, the primary subjects in African art, depict desirable and undesirable aspects of human behavior. Deities, ancestors and other spiritual beings that are portrayed embody the breadth of African religious beliefs and practices.

The creators of tradition-based African art are known and respected members of their communities. Unfortunately, those who created many of the exquisite works now found in museum collections remain unknown because their names were not recorded when the objects were collected many decades ago. In

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FORCE ET MESURE

Elaborer une esthétique de l'Afrique noire apparaît comme une entreprise hasardeuse à bien des égards. Est-il légitime d'isoler ces objets, qu'aujourd'hui nous qualifions d'œuvres d'art, du cadre général de leurs relations et de leurs contraintes culturelles ? Peut-on les soumettre à un critère qui n'a jamais existé dans la pensée de leurs créateurs ? Et peut-on, enfin, voir dans cet art - si l'on s' en tient à ce terme - un phénomène uniforme, malgré la grande variété de styles tant régionaux que locaux que nous offre cet énorme continent, à la suite de longues évolutions historiques souvent mal connues ? Enfin, n'oublions pas que cette approche exclut de vastes régions, notamment l' Afrique blanche, c' est à dire la zone méditerranéenne avec son histoire millénaire ; l'Afrique orientale et méridionale dont les peuples de pasteurs ont donné naissance à des cultures pratiquement sans images ; et enfin ces sociétés de chasseurs, qui, encore à notre époque, n'ont pas dépassé le stade d'évolution de la préhistoire et dont les peintures rupestres constituent le principal témoignage d'une production artistique qui apparaît en divers points du continent. De même, il nous faut exclure de notre contribution à une esthétique de l'art d'Afrique noire les anciennes sociétés féodales, notamment le Bénin. Notre réflexion se borne donc aux vastes régions paysannes, véritable berceau de la sculpture sur bois.

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Image Amedeo Modigliani
Amedeo Modigliani

Birth name     Amedeo Modigliani
Born     12 July 1884(1884-07-12)
Livorno, Tuscany
Died     24 January 1920 (aged 35)
Paris, France
Nationality     Italian
Field     Painting
Training     Accademia di Belle Arti, Istituto di Belle Arti
Works     Madame Pompadour
Jeanne Hébuterne in Red Shawl

Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (July 12, 1884 – January 24, 1920) was an Italian artist of Jewish heritage, practising both painting and sculpture, who pursued his career for the most part in France. Modigliani was born in Livorno (historically referred to in English as Leghorn), in center-western region Tuscany in Italy and began his artistic studies in Italy before moving to Paris in 1906. Influenced by the artists in his circle of friends and associates, by a range of genres and art movements, and by primitive art, Modigliani's œuvre was nonetheless unique and idiosyncratic. He died in Paris of tubercular meningitis, exacerbated by poverty, overworking, and an
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Art

Art

Art is the process or product of deliberately arranging elements in a way that appeals to the senses or emotions. It encompasses a diverse range of human activities, creations, and modes of expression, including music and literature. The meaning of art is explored in a branch of philosophy known as aesthetics.

The definition and evaluation of art has become especially problematic since the early 20th century. Richard Wollheim distinguishes three approaches: the Realist, whereby aesthetic quality is an absolute value independent of any human view; the Objectivist, whereby it is also an absolute value, but is dependent on general human experience; and the Relativist position, whereby it is not an absolute value, but depends on, and varies with, the human experience of different humans. An object may be characterized by the intentions, or lack thereof, of its creator, regardless of its apparent purpose. A cup, which ostensibly can be used as a container, may be considered art if intended solely as an ornament, while a painting may be deemed craft if mass-produced.

Traditionally, the term art was used to refer to any skill or mastery. This conception changed during the Romantic period, when art came to be seen as "a special faculty of the human mind to be classified with religion and science". Generally, art is made with the intention of stimulating thoughts and emotions.

The nature of art has been described by Richard Wollheim as "one of the most elusive of the traditional problems of human culture". It has been defined
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DE L'ART ANCIEN AFRICAIN, DE L'ETHNOLOGIE ET DU MUSEE: POUR UN RECENTREMENT DE L'ESTHETIQUE...


Au commencement était la nuit. Une longue nuit pour l'esthétique africaine. Ce fut le règne sans partage du musée dit «de séries», véritable vitrine du colonialisme, de confession évolutionniste et dont l'approche contextualiste célébrait l'Etrange, chantait l'Aventure et la Science. A cette époque point d'« objets », que des curiosités, trésors de guerre et pièces de laboratoires de chevronnés « Civilisateurs ». Il n'était pas rare alors, de voir des sculptures côtoyer dans les vitrines : cornes, peaux de bêtes et autres feuilles de palmier. Puis, il y eut le regard affûté d'une jeune génération d'artistes particulièrement douée et par ailleurs cruellement blasée, en quête de médecine pour un art européen las de son académisme figé. Cette génération vit dans ce fouillis les moyens d'une rédemption...

Une certaine révolution est venue corriger l'évidente injustice, consacrant depuis le siècle dernier des expositions à caractère esthétique pour la production africaine. Désormais, les objets, dans une dramaturgie suggérée par les seules qualités plastiques, invitent à un rapport nouveau. Exit la surabondance, la cacophonie et le "meurtre du vrai" que génère la tentative bancale de reconstitution de l'ailleurs fantasmé. Ici on ne rejoue pas le film de l'heureuse rencontre avortée entre "civilisés" et "primitifs". Nous avons les vrais Stars que sont les objets, mais d'une

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Sarah Lagrevol
Ecole du Louvre
Spécialité Arts de l'Afrique

INTRODUCTION
    
    L'Ethiopie, vaste pays mentionné dès le Ier siècle dans le récit grec Le périple de la Mer Erythrée, suscite un engouement particulier de la part des Européens.  Cette Ethiopie rêvée continue au Moyen Age avec le mythe du royaume du Prêtre jean.  
Depuis la conversion du pays au IVe siècle de notre ère, le monde chrétien est omniprésent et accompagne les fidèles dans leur vie quotidienne. Le symbole de la croix, marque distinctive des dévots et image de rédemption, est présent sur tous types de supports (peinture, sculpture, décor architectural, objet façonné…) et de nombreuses interprétations lui sont attachées. Ces croix participent aussi par la bénédiction et les pratiques d'exorcisme à protéger les fidèles et à les soigner spirituellement. Les différents types de médecines pratiquées donnent également lieu à la production de rouleaux aux vertus " magiques " qui chassent ou apaisent les esprits habitant le patient.

    De par l'étude de la
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Africa since 1935

Research Director
Professor A. A. Mazrui (Kenya)

Co-Director
C. Wondji (Ivory Coast)

Arts and society since 1935
J. VANSINA

Across Africa today the arts give the show an amazing cauldron of creativity emerged with a dizzying diversity of all layers of society. Many new artistic trends date from the second half of the colonial period. Besides, some pioneers are still working today. After all, it is past two generations since 1935. But in that short time, the artistic activity was a richness and diversity as this chapter may at most trace the main lines of its evolution (1).

Initially, we must enumerate a few general features of social and cultural matrix that is all. These are: the growing impact but unevenly distributed in Europe, the growth of cities, social stratification more trenches that lead to the formation of new classes, the industrial division of time has reached the beaches of leisure may be devoted to the practice and enjoyment of the arts, the prestige associated with the technical and technical training, changing the place and role of the artist in society, past status of artisan to that of cultural soothsayer The change in attitude toward art and their use, alteration of values in general and more specifically the changing religious values. The multiplication of objects of artistic production offers new opportunities, these are just

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Africa under colonial rule, 1880-1935

Research Director
Professor A. A. Boahen (Ghana)

In February 1976, in Nigeria, a man was arrested at a police checkpoint between Ibadan and Lagos. He was carrying two bags full of bronze sculptures and wood on suspicion of having stolen it affirmât well as the owner. Upon inquiry, the man telling the truth. Recently converted to Islam, he lived and worked in Ibadan at a community center. The effigies of deities carved Yoruba he was carrying had been brought in Ibadan, like many others, by migrant workers to satisfy the spiritual aspirations of these artisans, shopkeepers, civil servants and other migrant workers in their temporary residence. But the leader of the community, having converted to Islam, began in turn to convert their neighbors. Converted in his turn, the suspect heard himself served as symbols of their ancient faith were to disappear to allow the community center to become a dwelling worthy of the spiritual presence of Allah. Unable to consider destroying these objects, he resolved to return to his village, place of origin, where they have since been resettled.

This incident is a perfect example of the evolution of cultural forms and their concrete manifestation and at the same time, the survival or the renewal of cultural values from specific forms of domination, whether of a religious or more clearly social. What remained true in 1976 was even more common during this period particularly dramatic external domination of Africa, which saw the submission of an entire people, its social

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art is an art museum located on the eastern edge of Central Park, along what is known as Museum Mile in New York City, USA. It has a permanent collection containing more than two million works of art, divided into nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, often referred to simply as "the Met," is one of the world's largest art galleries, and has a much smaller second location in Upper Manhattan, at "The Cloisters," which features medieval art.

Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. A number of notable interiors, ranging from 1st century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. It opened on February 20, 1872, and was originally located at 681 Fifth Avenue.

As of 2007, the Met measures almost a quarter mile long and occupies more than two million square feet.
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The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture situated in London. Its collections, which number more than 7 million objects, are among the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its beginning to the present.

The British Museum was established in 1753, largely based on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. The museum first opened to the public on 15 January 1759 in Montagu House in Bloomsbury, on the site of the current museum building. Its expansion over the following two and a half centuries has resulted in the creation of several branch institutions, the first being the British Museum of Natural History in South Kensington in 1887. Until 1997, when the current British Library building opened to the public, replacing the old British Museum Reading Room, the British Museum was unique in that it housed both a national museum of antiquities and a national library in the same building.

The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. As with all other national museums and art galleries in Britain, the Museum charges no admission fee, although charges are levied for some temporary special exhibitions. Since 2001 the director of the Museum has been Neil MacGregor.

History

Though principally a museum of cultural art objects and antiquities today, the British Museum was founded as a "universal museum". Its foundations lie in the will of the physician and naturalist Sir Hans Sloane (1660–1753). During the course of his lifetime Sloane gathered an enviable collection of curiosities and whilst not wishing to see his collection broken up after death, he bequeathed it to King George II, for the nation, for the princely sum of £20,000.

At that time,
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african art / art africain / primitive art / art primitif / arts premiers / art gallery / art tribal / tribal art / l'oeil et la main / galerie d'art premier / Agalom / Armand Auxiètre / www.african-paris.com / www.agalom.com

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